This Week in CTE

June 14th, 2019

TWEET OF THE WEEK

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE WEEK

House Fiscal Year 2020 Appropriations Process Moves Forward

On June 10, the House of Representatives moved ahead with the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (Labor-HHS-Ed) appropriations process by packaging it with the funding bills for the Legislative Branch, Defense, State, Foreign Operations, and Energy and Water, into what is called a “minibus” appropriations bill, H.R. 2740. Members of the House proposed a total of 189 amendments to the Labor-HHS-Ed portion of H.R. 2740, and the House Committee on Rules determined that 77 of these would be considered. Representative Angie Craig (D-MN) proposed one of these amendments, an amendment that brings attention to the importance of Career Technical Education (CTE) (however, it does not increase or decrease the money allocated to CTE State Grants). It is anticipated that the full House will vote on this appropriations package next week.

Read the full blog to learn more.

To make sure you get the latest news and resources about federal policy that affects Career Technical Education (CTE), sign up for our Legislative Updates!

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

Did you know this year marked the 65th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board decision? It ruled that racial segregation of children in public schools was unconstitutional. The Alliance for Excellent Education has started a year-long campaign titled  #OurChallengeOurHope on the unmet promise of the Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court decision. The campaign was created to ensure that the spotlight on this landmark case doesn’t dim until the next anniversary, will shine a light on the continuing needs of students—no matter their race, zip code, or background. Every month they share an issue related to the unfulfilled promise of the landmark case and this month is High School Graduation Rates. Watch the video to learn more: https://youtu.be/itl8nhG_2PE

Learn more about the “Our Challenge Our Hope” campaign at www.all4ed.org/BrownVBoard.

RESOURCE OF THE WEEK

Looking for a primer on what CTE is, how it’s funded and the impact of CTE programs? Read 101: Career Technical Education a new fact sheet released today by Higher Learning Advocates and Advance CTE. This document provides an overview of what CTE is, postsecondary CTE outcomes and funding mechanisms for CTE programs. Check out the full fact sheet here. Here are a few notable facts:

  • There are 2.6 million learners in postsecondary CTE programs;
  • Eighty-six percent of adult learners concentrating in CTE are employed in their field or continue their education within six months of program completion; and
  • In Fiscal Year 2019, Congress allocated about $1.27 billion toward CTE programs.

Read the fact sheet here.

House Appropriations Minibus and U.S. Department of Education Proposed Accreditation Regulations

June 14th, 2019

This week, the House of Representatives continued to move forward with the Fiscal Year 2020 (FY20) appropriations process. Read below to learn more about this appropriations update, new proposed higher education regulations, a postsecondary Career Technical Education (CTE) fact sheet and how you can get involved in a campaign to double the federal investment in CTE.

House FY2020 Appropriations Process Moves Forward

On June 10, the House of Representatives moved ahead with the Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (Labor-HHS-Ed) appropriations process by packaging it with the funding bills for the Legislative Branch, Defense, State, Foreign Operations, and Energy and Water, into what is called a “minibus” appropriations bill, H.R. 2740. Members of the House proposed a total of 189 amendments to the Labor-HHS-Ed portion of H.R. 2740, and the House Committee on Rules determined that 77 of these would  be considered. Representative Angie Craig (D-MN) proposed one of these amendments, an amendment that brings attention to the importance of CTE (however, it does not increase or decrease the money allocated to CTE State Grants). It is anticipated that the full House will vote on this appropriations package next week.

The Senate Appropriations Committee has not yet released their FY20 funding bill for Labor-HHS-Ed. In addition, Congress has not yet agreed on the overall levels of spending for defense and non-defense discretionary spending, which must happen before final allocations for the FY20 appropriations bills can be determined.Advance CTE will continue to provide updates as additional information becomes available.

New College Accreditation Regulations from U.S. Department of Education

This week, the U.S. Department of Education published the proposed regulations to change the federal requirements for college accreditation to the federal register for a 30-day public review. These regulations are a result of the negotiated rulemaking process that concluded with  consensus in April. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos released a statement on the proposed regulations, which would reduce some of the regulatory requirements and simplify state authorization rules for distance education. Proposed updated rules for distance education and innovation, TEACH grants and faith-based institutions are expected to be published soon.

Advance CTE and Higher Learning Advocates Release New Factsheet

Advance CTE and Higher Learning Advocates released a new fact sheet on 101: Career Technical Education as part of the Higher Learning Advocates 101 resource series. This document provides an overview of what CTE is, postsecondary CTE outcomes and funding mechanisms for CTE programs. Check out the full fact sheet here.

Get Involved in the Campaign to Double the Investment in CTE

Looking to support efforts to increase the federal investment in CTE? Check out www.ISupportCTE.org, the website for the campaign to double the investment in CTE. In February, the CTE community launched this shared campaign and we invite everyone to join us in asking employers to sign onto a statement that supports doubling the investment in CTE. The signatures collected from employers will be a critical component to building visibility and support for CTE with members of Congress. Check out the share page to find a one-pager, PowerPoint, social media toolkit, and more that you can use and modify to spread the word about the campaign.

Meredith Hills, Policy Associate

Senate CTE Caucus Holds Briefing on Swiss Apprenticeships

June 10th, 2019

Last week, the Senate CTE Caucus and Embassy of Switzerland hosted a briefing on Swiss-Inspired Apprenticeships in the U.S.: Recent Initiatives and Developments. The afternoon included a variety of remarks from the Swiss, United States federal government, student and administrator perspectives on the impacts of apprenticeship programs.

Swiss Ambassador Martin Dahinden began the briefing by sharing that two out of three students in Switzerland participates in an apprenticeship, and 40 percent of all businesses participate without being compensated by the federal government. Simon Marti, speaking from the Swiss Embassy, explained that the apprenticeship model is 60 percent privately funded, 10 percent by cantons (a Swiss canton is equivalent to a U.S. state) and 30 percent federally funded. Participating companies get approximately a half billion dollar return on investment just during the initial training period.

Marti outlined the three factors that have led to success for the Swiss apprenticeship model:

  1. The apprenticeship model is fully integrated into the education system;
  2. There are strong public-private partnerships; and
  3. Apprenticeships are comprehensive and labor market oriented.

The apprenticeship model takes on a systems approach that involved three core partners- the federal government, cantons and the private sector- that all share one common mission. The close working relationship between the three, operating under a common goal, leads to effective apprenticeship programs.

Senate CTE Caucus Co-Chairs, Senator Tim Kaine (D-VA) and Senator Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) joined the briefing as well, and each gave remarks voicing support of expanding opportunities for high-quality apprenticeships.

The full list of speakers included:

  • Senator Tim Kaine (D-VA)
  • Senator Tammy Baldwin (D-WI)
  • H.E. Martin Dahinden, Ambassador of Switzerland to the USA
  • Simon Marti, Head of the Office of Science, Technology and Higher Education at the Swiss Embassy
  • Mike Gunner, General Manager at Mikron Corporation Denver
  • Selena Elekovic, Apprentice at Mikron Corporation Denver
  • Meaghan Sullivan, Chief Program Officer, CareerWise Colorado

Meredith Hills, Policy Associate

This Week in CTE

June 7th, 2019

TWEET OF THE WEEK

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE WEEK

Appropriations Fact Sheet Shared by the House Committee on Appropriations

The House Committee on Appropriations released a one-page fact sheet on the Fiscal Year 2020 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies appropriations bill outlining some of the funding increases the bill allocated to the Departments of Labor, Health & Human Services and Education. Read it here

To make sure you get the latest news and resources about federal policy that affects Career Technical Education (CTE), sign up for our Legislative Updates!

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

Learners attending the West Ada Career and Technical Education Vet Science Program were recently featured in the Leaders in Learning – Idaho News segment for giving back to their community and learning at the same time! Nicole Mitchell and Karson Turley are seniors in high school and are both raising guide dogs for the blind. The dogs accompany them in the classroom and they help to teach the dogs how to handle daily distractions.

Watch the video here.

RESOURCE OF THE WEEK

2019 Report on the Condition of Education

The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) released the annual Condition of Education report which examines the condition of education in the United States from prekindergarten through postsecondary, as well as labor force outcomes. The report includes data and analysis for 48 indicators across four categories: Preprimary, Elementary and Secondary Education, Postsecondary Education, Populating Characteristics and Economic Outcomes and International Comparisons. It also included a “spotlight indicators” section that examines postsecondary education enrollment and outcomes.

Key findings:

  • Undergraduate enrollment increased by 27 percent between 2000 and 2017, and by 2028 undergraduate enrollment is expected to increase by 17.2 million students;
  • In the fall of 2017, 75 percent of undergraduate learners at four-year institutions were enrolled full-time and 37 percent of undergraduate learners at two-year institutions were enrolled full-time;
  • From 2000 to 2017 the median earnings of young adults were consistently higher for those with some type of postsecondary attainment than without; and
  • The number of postsecondary certificates and degrees awarded increased from the 2000-2001 and 2016-2017 school years.

Read the full report here.

NCES Report on the Condition of Education, Update on the Innovation and Modernization Grants

June 5th, 2019

This week brings new research on postsecondary education in the U.S., as well as an important update on the Innovation and Modernization Grants authorized under the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V). Read below to learn about the newest reports on higher education, how to apply to be a peer reviewer for the Perkins V Innovation and Modernization Grants, and the latest Fiscal Year 2020 appropriations resource.

NCES Released 2019 Report on the Condition of Education

The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) released the annual Condition of Education report. The congressionally mandated report includes data and analysis for 48 indicators across four categories: 1) Preprimary, Elementary and Secondary Education; 2) Postsecondary Education; 3) Populating Characteristics and Economic Outcomes and 4) International Comparisons. This year’s report also included a “spotlight indicators” section that examines postsecondary education enrollment (e.g., broken down by socioeconomic status) and outcomes (e.g., completion and transfer rates for nontraditional undergraduate students).

Some of the findings in the report include:

  • Undergraduate enrollment increased by 27 percent between 2000 and 2017, and by 2028 undergraduate enrollment is expected to increase by 17.2 million students;
  • In the fall of 2017, 75 percent of undergraduate learners at four-year institutions were enrolled full-time and 37 percent of undergraduate learners at two-year institutions were enrolled full-time;
  • From 2000 to 2017 the median earnings of young adults was consistently higher for those with some type of postsecondary attainment than without; and
  • The number of postsecondary certificates and degrees awarded increased from the 2000-2001 and 2016-2017 school years.

Check out the full report, At a Glance document and Highlights document for more information.

New NSC Policy Brief Details  Postsecondary Consumer Reports

A new policy brief from the National Skills Coalition, Consumer Reports for Today’s Postsecondary Students, outlines the different consumer-facing postsecondary reports currently in play. The report explains the required performance measures and reports for the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) and the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V), as well as the measures included in the U.S. Department of Education’s College Scorecard. The report also discusses the value of reporting short-term post-graduation labor market outcomes.

Call for Peer Reviewers to Apply by Friday, 6/7 for Perkins Innovation and Modernization Grant Program

The Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education (OCTAE) in the U.S. Department of Education put out a call for peer reviewers for the Perkins Innovation and Modernization Grant Program (Perkins I and M). The review process will take place across three weeks from the end of June to the middle of July. Reviewers should fit the following qualifications:

  • “Persons who are career and technical education (CTE) school leaders, teachers, district leaders, foundation officers, university faculty (who work with CTE), researchers, evaluators, professional development providers, or other individuals who have significant and current CTE experience and expertise at the secondary or postsecondary level.
  • Persons who are interested in identifying what is new or innovative nationally in CTE, and in determining how those innovations can be successfully implemented and evaluated.
  • Persons who are excellent writers, good critical thinkers, and committed to completing assigned tasks in a professional and timely manner.”

In order to apply, resumes (at most five pages) must be sent to PerkinsIandMgrants@ed.gov by this Friday, June 7.

Appropriations Fact Sheet Shared by the House Committee on Appropriations

As the Fiscal Year 2020 (FY20) appropriations process continues, the House Committee on Appropriations released a one-page fact sheet on the FY20 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies appropriations bill outlining some of the funding increases the bill allocated to the Departments of Labor, Health & Human Services and Education.

Meredith Hills, Policy Associate

Oregon’s Perkins V Planning Process Aims to Go Beyond Federal Compliance

June 3rd, 2019

While one-year transition plans for the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V) now submitted, states are very involved in the process of developing their four-year plans, due in the spring of 2020. Advance CTE, in partnership with ACTE, has been contracted to facilitate and inform this process for the state of Oregon, and recently led a workshop with key state and regional leaders to focus on priority areas.

The workshop took place over the course of two days in April in Salem, Oregon, and included around 35 participants, including state-level staff from both the Department of Education and the Higher Education Coordinating Commission, as well as regional and institutional representatives and employer and workforce partners. The first day focused on facilitating discussions on Oregon’s previous use of Advance CTE’s Policy Benchmark Tool on program approval policies to examine program quality across secondary and postsecondary. Oregon began using the tool in 2018, and plan to use the findings to inform priorities for Perkins V planning.

On the second day, participants participated in prioritization exercises and provided input on Oregon’s forthcoming state vision and priorities for CTE. This vision and priorities will go beyond the requirements of Perkins V, and instead will leverage the federal law to promote a broad plan for success for Oregon learners. Participants also had conversations focused on equity, career advising and meaningful stakeholder engagement.

The workshop happened in the midst of Advance CTE and ACTE developing and Oregon leaders administering a statewide stakeholder survey, which focused on multiple measures of quality in CTE. Going forward, Advance CTE and ACTE will continue to work with Oregon state leaders, particularly in the facilitation of four work groups, each focused on a priority area identified by participants during the workshop and informed by data from the statewide survey. Oregon staff are also conducting stakeholder engagement activities and working across secondary and postsecondary to ensure that both the Perkins V state plan and broader strategic plan for CTE adequately address the needs of learners in Oregon.

Brianna McCain, Policy Associate

THIS WEEK IN CTE

May 31st, 2019

TWEET OF THE WEEK

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE WEEK

Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeship Network and Grantees Announced

The Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeship (PAYA) is excited to announce the nine outstanding grantees and introduce the PAYA Network. Working with PAYA, these sites will launch and expand high-quality youth apprenticeship programs across the country. Read the press release to here learn more!

New Higher Education Experimental Sites Initiatives Announced

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos shared details about new and updated higher education Experimental Sites Initiatives. The Experimental Sites Initiatives is authorized under the Higher Education Act to pilot and evaluate proposed changes in policy. Through each initiative, the Education Department waives the statutory or regulatory federal student aid requirements relative to that initiative for a limited number of institutions in order to test the effectiveness of that new program. This announcement included the expansion of the Second Chance Pell program, which allows incarcerated individuals to access Pell Grants, by providing an opportunity for additional institutions to apply for inclusion.

Learn more here.

To make sure you get the latest news and resources about federal policy that affects Career Technical Education (CTE), sign up for our Legislative Updates!

Rural Community College Grant Application Convenings

This summer the U.S. Department of Education and the American Association of Community Colleges will be co-hosting three convenings designed to help rural community colleges identify, plan, and design projects for federal grant applications. Activities will include facilitated workshops and information from federal agencies with upcoming grant opportunities. These convenings will take place at the following locations:

  • June 6–7 at Gateway Technical College, Racine, Wisconsin;
  • July 18–19 at Lakes Region Community College, Laconia, New Hampshire; and
  • September 12–13 at Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, Biloxi, Mississippi.

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

Check out this video of U.S. Congressman for Rhode Island’s Second District speaking about the importance of CTE in regards to building and maintaining our country’s infrastructures. He noted research from the Brookings Institute that stated nearly three million skilled workers will be needed to support this work over the next decade. He asked for congressional leadership to prioritize workforce development in future legislation relevant to this topic crediting CTE as the strategy to use to help train the future workforce. Watch the video here.

Interested in advocating for CTE? Consider sharing the Double the Investment in CTE campaign. If you’re a business you can sign on here.

RESOURCE OF THE WEEK

Putting Pell Grants to Work for Working Students

In this report, the National Skills Coalition outlines policy recommendations and encourages Congress to recognize the important role of community and technical colleges in equipping working students and businesses with the credentials and skills needed in today’s economy. It also describes how increasing Pell eligibility for learners enrolled in short-term credential programs could help address the demand for qualified workers to fill “middle-skill” jobs. The report concludes with case studies highlighting Iowa and Virginia’s efforts to increase access to short-term programs through the GAP Tuition Assistance Program and New Economy Workforce Grant Program, respectively.

Read the report here.

Excellence in Action Spotlighting: Sunrise Mountain High School, Fire Science Program

May 28th, 2019

Schools and postsecondary institutions must rely on partners, especially employers and community-based organizations, to augment and supplement learners’ experiences. A high-quality Career Technical Education (CTE) program requires partnerships that offer support and create authentic real-world experiences. One example of this type of program is the Fire Science program of study in Arizona, a 2018 Excellence in Action Award winner in the Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security Career Cluster®.

The program was started in 2004 due to Arizona’s critical need for employees in fire science. To meet this demand, the Peoria Fire Science Advisory Council worked with Peoria Unified School District to develop the program of study. The Fire Science Advisory Council whose members includes multiple educational partners, eight fire departments, representatives from the Bureau of Land Management, and Professional Medical Transport Ambulance staff, among others. Council members regularly offer work-based learning experiences, including mentorship, job shadowing and internships. The local fire departments are also key partners and their employees serve as mentors, offer internships and even teach in the classroom. For example, the City of Peoria Fire Department has been a partner for over 20 years and provided the first instructors to the Fire Science Department.

“These young men and women come in prepared both physically and mentally while possessing the necessary skills to become a professional firefighter. The Peoria Unified School District Fire Science Program is a huge asset in preparing our future firefighters and lays the groundwork for a successful career in fire service,” said Captain Tony Neely, Lead Recruit Training Officer, Peoria Fire Medical Department.

All learners are required to complete a minimum of 100 hours of work-based learning activities, including internships, job shadowing, ride alongs and more. The hands-on skills the Fire Science students are gaining in workplace settings are complemented by their classroom instruction. Program instructors are an active-duty fire captain and a firefighter, each bringing decades of professional experience to the classroom.

The program prepares learners for postsecondary and career success by providing rigorous in-school instruction. Learners also earn college credit, and various industry certification offerings allowing learners multiple on and off ramps throughout their education and career. Specifically, students can earn up to nine dual enrollment credits, which articulate to an associate of science degree in emergency response and operations in fire science.

Learn more about the Fire Science Program at Sunrise Mountain High School and our 2018 Excellence in Action Award winners.

Perkins V: How can states expand access to high-quality CTE in rural communities?

May 23rd, 2019

The Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V) brings a new opportunity for states to examine what access to high-quality Career Technical Education (CTE) looks like in rural areas and develop strategies to address challenges to delivering CTE in rural areas. Perkins V also continues to provide states with the flexibility to leverage the reserve fund to support CTE in rural communities. The reserve fund is an option available to states to distribute funds to local eligible recipients of Perkins funds (e.g., local school districts, area CTE centers, community colleges, etc.) through an alternative method (which could be by formula, competition, a combination, etc.).

In Perkins V, the allowable reserve fund was increased from 10 percent to 15 percent (i.e., up to 15 percent of the 85 percent of Perkins funds that must be distributed to local recipients can be distributed through an alternative method) and must be used in areas with high numbers or percentages of CTE students, or rural communities, or areas with disparities or gaps in performance among population groups. While these funds are flexible, they must be directed to spurring innovation or supporting programs of study. How can states use the new opportunity that Perkins V brings to expand access to high-quality CTE in rural communities? Check out the resources below to learn more.

BRIEF: CTE on the Frontier: Catalyzing Local Efforts to Improve Program Quality: This brief from Advance CTE explores state strategies to improve the quality of local CTE programs to ensure they meet industry needs and expand opportunities for rural learners. The brief highlights different approaches state leaders can take to empower local leaders and support program improvement in rural areas.

BRIEF: CTE on the Frontier: Connecting Rural Learners with the World of Work: This brief from Advance CTE explores how states have identified ways to bring the physical experience of work-based learning and employer engagement directly to learners through simulated workplace experiences, innovative satellite campuses and mobile labs.

BRIEF: CTE on the Frontier: Providing Learners Access to Diverse Career Pathways: This brief from Advance CTE is designed to help states identify promising strategies for expanding the variety of career pathways available in rural areas. The brief profiles how states have leveraged strategic partnerships and new technologies to reach economies of scale and offer a wider breadth of career pathways to rural learners.

BRIEF: CTE on the Frontier: Strengthening the Rural CTE Teacher Pipeline: This brief from Advance CTE examines challenges and strategies for expanding access to high-quality career pathways in rural areas and addresses one of the most pressing challenges rural schools and institutions face: strengthening the pipeline of qualified CTE teachers and faculty.

MORE RESOURCES

Looking for additional resources? Please be sure to check out the Learning that Works Resource Center.

New Higher Education Experimental Sites Initiatives Announced and College Scorecard Expanded

May 22nd, 2019

The big policy news related to Career Technical Education (CTE) in Washington, D.C. this week focused on postsecondary education. The importance of CTE was also recognized with the announcement of the U.S. Presidential CTE Scholars and a Senate CTE Caucus event. Read below to learn more about each of these updates.

Secretary DeVos Announces Higher Education Experimental Sites

This week, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos shared details about new and updated higher education  Experimental Sites Initiatives. The Experimental Sites Initiatives is authorized under the Higher Education Act to pilot and evaluate proposed changes in policy. Through each initiative, the Education Department waives the statutory or regulatory federal student aid requirements relative to that initiative for a limited number of institutions in order to test the effectiveness of that new program.

First, Secretary DeVos announced a Federal Work-Study Experiment that would give selected colleges new flexibilities for students to participate in private-sector work-based learning opportunities, including:

  • No limits on the amount of Federal Work-Study funding that institutions can provide to private-sector employers;
  • Increased funding for Job Location and Development, which institutions can use to establish apprenticeship intermediaries; and
  • A reduced wage share for certain private-sector employers (e.g., small businesses) involved with institutions that are part of the experiment.

Second, Secretary DeVos announced the expansion of the Second Chance Pell program, which allows incarcerated individuals to access Pell Grants, by providing an opportunity for additional institutions to apply for inclusion. The Second Chance Pell pilot program was created under the Obama administration in 2015, and renewed in February 2019.

Expanded College Scorecard Released by Secretary DeVos

Secretary DeVos announced changes to the College Scorecard, an online interactive tool that allows users to gather information on the cost and certain outcomes (e.g., median earnings, median loan debt, and loan default and repayment rates) of higher education institutions. New information can now be accessed through the College Scorecard, such as:

  • Data on 2,100 non-degree granting institutions;
  • Graduation rates and transfer information for non-first-time and non-full-time students;
  • Up-to-date metrics from the National Center for Education Statistics Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System; and
  • Preliminary student loan debt data by field of study.


2019 U.S. Presidential CTE Scholars Selected 

Every year, the U.S. Department of Education recognizes the top high school seniors across the country through the U.S. Presidential Scholars Program, including students who excel in CTE. A U.S. Presidential Scholar in CTE must be nominated by their Chief State School Officer. All candidates then complete an application and are evaluated for academic achievement, character, and leadership by a review committee of secondary and postsecondary education leaders. The review committee selects the semifinalists from this group, and the Commission on Presidential Scholars, a group of independent individuals appointed by the President from across the country and spanning a range of professional backgrounds, asses the remaining pool to choose the finalists. The Commission selects only 60 CTE semifinalists and up to 20 CTE finalists.

The 2019 final U.S. Presidential CTE Scholars have been selected, and include students from Arizona, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawai’i, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, South Carolina, Washington and Wisconsin.

Senate CTE Caucus Event Shines a Light on CTE Data

On May 21, Advance CTE’s Senior Policy Associate, Austin Estes, participated in a Senate CTE Caucus briefing on CTE data. The panel event also featured Catherine Imperatore from the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE), Dr. Bryan Wilson from the Workforce Data Quality Campaign (an initiative of the National Skills Coalition), and Dr. Nicassia Belton from the Maryland State Department of Education. The panelists discussed the value of data to promoting equity and quality in CTE, and the challenges states face in improving the accessibility, quality, and use of their data as they prepare to meet new reporting and accountability requirements in the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V). Advance CTE shared findings from this year’s State of CTE report, highlighting the need for cross-sector data sharing and partnership across the states.

Austin Estes, Senior Policy Associate & Meredith Hills, Policy Associate

 

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