Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeship Network and Grantees Announced

May 29th, 2019

The Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeship (PAYA), a multi-stakeholder initiative, just announced its nine grantees under the first joint philanthropic investment to expand youth apprenticeship in the United States. These grantees –  selected from an extremely competitive pool of over 220 applicants from 49 states and Puerto Rico – will launch and expand high-quality youth apprenticeship programs in multiple cities, regions, and states, and in a range of industries. The grantee recipients are:

  • Apprenticeship 502 (Louisville, KY)
  • ApprenticeshipNC (Raleigh, NC)
  • The Birmingham Promise (Birmingham, AL)
  • Career Launch Chicago (Chicago, IL)
  • Early Care and Education Youth Apprenticeship (Oakland, CA)
  • King County Regional Youth Apprenticeship Consortium (Renton, WA)
  • Montana Youth Apprenticeship Partnership (Helena, MT)
  • Texas Youth Apprenticeship Program (Austin, TX)
  • Twin Cities LEAP Initiative (Minneapolis, MN)

Grant funding will support sites’ strategy development and implementation activities over a 17-month period, beginning in May 2019. During this period, grantees will engage in cross-site learning and receive tailored technical assistance from PAYA National Partner organizations and other leading experts in the education, workforce, and policy sectors.

In addition, grantees will join the new PAYA Network – a national learning community designed to link high-potential, dynamic partnerships working to across the country to launch, expand, and improve apprenticeship opportunities for high school-aged youth. The PAYA Network was formed to recognize, support, and connect high-potential leaders identified through the PAYA Grant Initiative, and to support them as they work to build the emerging field of youth apprenticeship.

Advance CTE is thrilled to join our partners at New America, CareerWise Colorado, Charleston Regional Youth Apprenticeship, Education Strategy Group, JFF, the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity, the National Fund for Workforce Solutions, and the National Governors Association in leading this effort. We see the incredible impact such an investment of resources and support will have on expanding high-quality youth apprenticeship in these communities across the country.

To learn more, visit newamerica.org/paya and stay connected to the initiative’s progress by following the #PAYA hashtag.

Kate Kreamer, Deputy Executive Director

Advance CTE 2019 Spring Meeting Staff Reflections Part 3

April 30th, 2019

This year’s Spring Meeting covered an array of exciting topics. Advance CTE staff reflects on the meeting in this three-part blog series. 

Being Bold in Perkins V Planning

Trying something new is a risk but we did just that at the Advance CTE spring meeting! You see we have been encouraging states to be bold in their approach to crafting Perkins V state plans. And while the mantra of ‘being bold’ has taken hold, we have continued to get the question – what does being bold look like? To answer this question, we decided to try a mini case study approach. We often see that the lesson for oneself is found when offering advice to others.  So, we created a fictional state called “Bolder” and shared out a set of facts and data – demographic, labor market, performance, student outcomes, etc. and asked participants to identify the most pressing opportunity related to equity, quality, career advisement, data, and systems alignment, and how Perkins V can be leveraged to best address these important topics. The goal was to help attendees break free of the strictures of their own state and to ideate, create and incubate bold ideas in a fictitious but reality-based state.

I was encouraged to see the engagement of attendees, who easily jumped in to identify the challenges and opportunities. It got tougher when attendees were asked to rethink or leverage Perkins V to address the challenge or opportunity. In the end, we probably didn’t walk out with a ready-to-replicate set of bold ideas but I do think participants flexed their creative muscles and hopefully will take that creativity back home and do something different as a result – look at their data in a different way, ask a tough question, push a bit harder, reach out to a new stakeholder, revisit an antiquated policy or program, commit to using a new lever in Perkins – that is what being bold is all about!

Kimberly Green, Executive Director

Problems of Practice

At last year’s Advance CTE Spring Meeting we introduced the Problems of Practice session, and it was exciting to see how that session grew in size and scope during this year’s Spring Meeting. This time, we were able to feature 16 different table topics spanning middle school, high school, postsecondary education and workforce development. All those at the table had the opportunity to hear from a state leader about what that particular issue looked like in their state, and then the table had the chance for an intimate conversation about common barriers and strategies for success. I enjoyed not only observing states making progress in thinking through common goals, but also forming new relationships with others at the table. Many state representatives and organizational partners exchanged contact information so that they could keep the conversation going outside of this session. It was great to see states working together to advance shared goals!

Meredith Hills, Policy Associate

Let’s Double the Investment in CTE!

Earlier this year, Advance CTE and the CTE community launched an effort to double the federal investment in CTE. During the Spring Meeting, we held an engaging session where the Advance CTE regions competed to see which one could commit to securing the most employer signatures. Region B won with a total commitment of 5,175 signatures and all of the regions together committed to over 17,000 signatures. While 26 states and every Career Cluster® are represented in the list of signatures from employers, we still need more signatures to meet our goal.

State and local CTE leaders are critical partners in helping us achieve our ambitious goal. How many employers from your state can YOU get to sign on to the campaign? Sign up to receive information about the campaign here. For more information about the campaign and how to get the word out, visit the share page to find sample Tweets, graphics, email blurbs, and more to help you communicate about the campaign.

Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Manager

Advance CTE 2019 Spring Meeting Staff Reflections Part 2

April 19th, 2019

This year’s Spring Meeting covered an array of exciting topics. Advance CTE staff reflects on the meeting in this three-part blog series. 

Exploring Equity in CTE

At the 2018 Spring Meeting, Advance CTE formally launched our initiative on equity in CTE with a panel and breakouts devoted to that topic. This year I had the great honor of presenting on the results of that work so far, including the adoption of Advance CTE’s Statement on Equity in CTE, as well as the release of three publications under the Making Good on the Promise series.

I then moderated a panel of national experts on equity topics to reflect on how we can continue to tackle this work as a community of state and national leaders. The panelists were: Kisha Bird, Director of Youth Policy, CLASP; Nina Salomon, Deputy Program Director, Council on State Governments Justice Center; and Johan Uvin, President, Institute for Educational Leadership. The panelists discussed using data to ensure equitable resource distribution, developing partnerships across agencies and states to further equity efforts, and how state agencies can increase diversity within their own hiring practices. States have numerous opportunities under Perkins V to advance equity for each learner using CTE, but they will require bold action and some tough conversations. I am excited to continue to support our members in this work.

Ashleigh McFadden, State Policy Manager

Drawing on the content of the Making Good on the Promise briefs, Advance CTE hosted a series of equity breakouts during the 2019 Spring Meeting. These equity breakouts challenged state leaders to think about how they can examine and use data to define the equity problem in their respective states; build trust with historically marginalized communities; ensure access to CTE opportunities for each learner; design a supportive environment for each learner; and deliver equitable outcomes for learners.

I was one of the facilitators for the equity breakout that focused on building trust with historically marginalized communities. I was struck by how open and honest state leaders were about equity gaps in their respective states and their commitment to closing those gaps. Participants in the session discussed how to engage historically marginalized communities and message high-quality CTE to appeal to various populations. As state leaders continue to work towards closing equity gaps, I’m excited to see how they will be bold in their approaches.

Brianna McCain, State Policy Associate

A Conversation with CTE Champions in Congress

At last year’s Spring Meeting, I moderated a discussion about the prospects and plans for the reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 and while I remained optimistic, it was unclear if the law would be reauthorized in the 115th Congress. Fast forward one year and the reauthorization – the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V) – has been on the books for more than eight months! However, we certainly wouldn’t be in this position without the leadership of the law’s co-sponsors in the U.S. House of Representatives, Congressmen Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL) and Glenn ‘GT’ Thompson (R-PA). Advance CTE was thrilled to have these two dedicated CTE champions join us at this year’s Spring Meeting and I was honored to have the privilege of moderating the conversation.

During this session, the Congressmen discussed why they got involved in the reauthorization. Representative Thompson (R-PA) shared how CTE “is a significant rung on the ladder of opportunity,” while Representative Krishnamoorthi (D-IL) discussed how CTE plays a role in restoring America’s middle class and connecting to postsecondary education, as he pointed out that, “Even if a four-year degree isn’t in everyone’s plans, a quality postsecondary education has to be.” Both Congressmen are looking forward to the implementation of the law and emphasized the importance of engaging the many stakeholders that CTE has and the opportunity to coordinate and collaborate with business and industry leaders. When asked about how the federal investment in CTE has made a difference in their districts, Representative Krishnamoorthi (D-IL) described an automotive technology program in his district that enrolled nearly the same number of male and female learners and how the program was making in a difference in his community and Representative Thompson (R-PA) told a story about how a CTE program in Pennsylvania was transformational in the life of a learner with a disability. The bipartisan agreement about the value and promise of CTE was clear – Representatives Thompson (R-PA) and Krishnamoorthi (D-IL) have visited each other’s districts and enjoyed sharing about their joint appearances and interviews. It’s not a surprise as to why – the energy and excitement they have for CTE is sure to inspire any audience, let alone a room full of CTE leaders at our Spring Meeting!

Kathryn Zekus, Senior Associate, Federal Policy

Advance CTE 2019 Spring Meeting Staff Reflections

April 17th, 2019

This year’s Spring Meeting covered an array of exciting topics. Advance CTE staff reflects on the meeting in this three-part blog series. 

This year’s 2019 Spring Meeting was our largest meeting ever. We wish to thank each and every attendee and sponsor for bringing your wonderful energy and insight to make this year’s meeting one of the most memorable I’ve had in my time with Advance CTE.

Nearly 300 national, state and local CTE leaders joined us April 8-9 at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC. Our attendees traveled from 47 states, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, and represented every aspect of CTE including secondary, postsecondary, workforce development, adult education and even the philanthropic community and other key partners.  

I also would like to thank and recognize our sponsors, whose partnership and support helped make our meeting a success:

Diamond Level

Kuder, CompTIA, Microsoft Imagine Academy

Platinum Level

CEV Multimedia, Certiport, Fleck Education, NOCTI, NCCER, Oracle Academy, Project Lead the Way, YouScience

Gold Level

ACT, Chmura Economics & Analytics, eScholar, Lincoln Electric, Siemens, Southern Regional Education Board

Silver Level

Manufacturing Skills Standards Council

Bronze Level

CareerSafe, Career Solutions Publishing, CORD, MBA Research, National Council for Health Science Education, NC3T, Precision Exams, The Get A Job Kit, Vivayic

Have you become a member of Advance CTE yet? Today is the perfect day to join us! Member benefits include discounted meeting registration, which you can use at our next in-person meeting.

We hope to see all of you in spring 2020 for our next public meeting. We’ll be announcing our date and location very soon!

Andrea Zimmermann, Senior Associate, Member Engagement and Leadership Development

Philanthropy and Student Leaders Discuss Importance of CTE

Advance CTE’s Spring meeting was full of amazing panels featuring passionate individuals committed to career readiness and Career Technical Education (CTE). One panel – Bold Priorities: The Philanthropic Role in Advancing Quality in CTE – featured leaders from four national philanthropic organizations that have all invested in efforts to ensure more learners are prepared for success in the careers of their choice.

The funders’ had a lot in common when it came to their priorities – closing both access and success equity gaps so every learner can benefit from CTE pathways and programs; strengthening our data and measures so stakeholders can make more informed decisions about credentials, work-based learning and overall investments; and ensuring strong implementation by better connecting state policy with on-the-ground work. JPMorgan Chase – through Skills at Work and the related New Skills for Work – is supporting states and communities across the world to close the skills gaps and prepare learners for the future of work. The Joyce Foundation is building models of regional innovation and implementation of career pathways systems in the Great Lakes states (more to come on that soon!) and will be supporting Perkins V in the future. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has identified pathways as a central focus of their new strategy, including support for Perkins V implementation over the coming years. And Lumina Foundation is evolving their work around credentials attainment to identify new models of postsecondary access and success. It was so heartening to share the stage with our philanthropic partners who are supporting such amazing work across the country!

Later on Tuesday afternoon, we had a particular treat – a panel of secondary, postsecondary and adult CTE learners who shared their stories of how CTE impacted their lives. These students are examples of the best and brightest of CTE. They were incredible advocates for how CTE helped them build professional skills and networks, find their passions and set a clear path for their future. Fritza Camille, for example, a learner at the University of District of Columbia, shared how CTE has changed her life and given her opportunities she couldn’t have imagined when she left college without a degree years before.  Ryleigh Travers, who attends one of Virginia’s high-achieving Governors’ Academies and taught us all about the in’s and out’s of livestock judging, talked about how she has had academic, workplace and leadership experiences through CTE that set her apart from her peers.

Zackery Love, a current student at George Washington University, got his first job in the health industry because of credentials he obtained in high school as a CTE student. He shared how, as his high school’s valedictorian and a pre-med college student, he wants to push others to rethink the outdated stigma against CTE. Tony Peeler, Jr., a future student at George Washington University, has already been able to foster his passion for the law throughout high school by spending time at law firms and in the courtroom. Tony and Ryleigh both aspire to political office in the future, Zack is working to be a doctor and Fritza will be rising through the hospitality industry. These students were so incredibly impressive and inspiring and are well on their way to achieving their dreams.

Kate Kreamer, Deputy Executive Director 

Measuring and Achieving Bold Results

Whenever possible, we like to use the spring or fall meetings to give State CTE Directors and Advance CTE members a preview of upcoming research. The timing for this year’s meeting just happened to align with the release of the 2019 State of Career Technical Education report – which is based on a national survey focused on the quality and effective use of career readiness data – and so Wednesday’s programming was dedicated to the theme of “Bold Results.”

The day started with a panel of national data quality experts, who unpacked the report’s major findings and called participants to action. Elizabeth Dabney, from the Data Quality Campaign, urged state leaders to use data as a bridge builder to break down silos across the secondary, postsecondary and workforce sectors. Ryan Ryena, from Education Strategy Group, echoed this idea and pushed states to go further and leverage their collective power to make bold improvements in the quality of their data. Bringing in the workforce perspective, Bryan Wilson from the Workforce Data Quality Campaign – a project of the National Skills Coalition – highlighted opportunities to align accountability and data collection between CTE and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).

After an engaging discussion on the power of high-quality data, panelists broke out to lead a series of breakout sessions on data quality and effectiveness, including topics such as aligning cross-sector data systems or measuring a “high-quality” program. The full State of CTE report will be available on April 18 in the Learning that Works Resource Center.

Austin Estes, Senior Policy Associate

Global Competencies, CTE & STEM

November 28th, 2018

When students enter the job market, they will need to know the global dimensions of their career pathway and how to work with people from different backgrounds – including here in our increasingly diverse country. Recognizing the incredible opportunities and necessities of linking Career Technical Education (CTE) and global competencies is why Advance CTE partnered with Asia Society, Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) and Longview Foundation to release Preparing a Globally Competent Workforce Through High-Quality Career and Technical Education back in 2015. 

Since the release of this report, this partnership has continued, leading to the development of the Global CTE Toolkit, which houses many curricular and instructional tools for embedding global competencies into CTE teaching and learning.

This work is now extending to focus squarely on STEM, with Advance CTE, the Global Education at Asia Society and ACTE partnering to create new online professional development modules that support CTE educators in integrating STEM content into their classrooms while teaching global skills via active, project-based learning. These 10 new modules – entitled Career Readiness in a Global Economy: STEM and CTE – will help educators understand how to make global connections to local issues; create high-quality global STEM projects; assess global workforce readiness skills; connect with classrooms abroad to complete collaborative projects; and teach students to be project managers so they are more successful in completing their projects.

These new modules, together with sample curriculum and other tools and resources are now being piloted and we are looking for state and local leaders and practitioners to join in and give your feedback. For each 15-minute module you give feedback on, you will be entered into a drawing for one of two $100 Amazon gift cards. All materials are free of charge due to generous support from the Project Management Institute Educational Foundation (PMIEF).

If you are interested in piloting these new materials, please visit CTE Learn, create a free log-in, and click on the Career Readiness in a Global Economy: STEM and CTE, button to get started. Also, feel free to share the link and information with others in your states and communities.

Contact Heather Singmaster at hsingmaster@asiasociety.org with any questions. All surveys must be completed by February 15, 2019 to be entered into the drawing.

Advance CTE Joins the Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeship Initiative

October 29th, 2018

High schools are struggling to prepare young people for today’s economy. Too many students are disengaged and have difficulty navigating their options after graduation. And, many students lack affordable postsecondary opportunities, while a postsecondary education is more important than ever. These challenges make the path to economic security difficult, especially for those facing the persistent racial, gender, and other inequities present in the country today.

At the same time, to compete and grow, employers need to build a sustainable pipeline of workers with adaptable skills. Career Technical Education (CTE) is central to ensuring we align students’ talents and interests with the needs of our economy and employers, and, in recent years, a number of states and communities have developed new youth apprenticeship programs to further expand access to high-quality, career-focused pathways for more learners.

Youth apprenticeship – when designed with quality and equity in mind – allow students to complete high school, start their postsecondary education at no cost, get paid work experience alongside a mentor, and start on a path that broadens their options for the future. However, the policy and practice of youth apprenticeship is still relatively nascent in the United States, necessitating supports and resources for the field.  This is why New America launched the Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeships – or PAYA – a national effort, of which Advance CTE is thrilled to be a part.

The partners of PAYA – Advance CTE, CareerWise Colorado, Charleston Regional Youth Apprenticeships, Education Strategy Group, JFF, the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity, the National Fund for Workforce Solutions, the National Governors Association and New America – will be working together over the next two years to explore the ways youth apprenticeship can be reinvented to better meet the needs of learners and employers.

“We are excited to work on an initiative that will help ensure that each learner has access to a high-quality education and meaningful work-based experiences that provides the skills he or she needs to be successful in a high-wage, in-demand career,” said Kimberly Green, Executive Director of Advance CTE. “PAYA represents a unique blend of policy, practice and research cutting across the national, state and local levels and has the potential for an incredible impact across our country.”

Over the next four years, PAYA will support efforts in states and cities to expand access to high-quality apprenticeship opportunities for high school age youth. PAYA will convene experts and partners, support a community of practitioners, publish research, and provide grants and direct assistance to promising youth apprenticeship programs in cities and states across the U.S.

Advance CTE joins our partners in thanking the funders of this initiative – Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Ballmer Group, Bloomberg Philanthropies, the Joyce Foundation, JP Morgan Chase & Co., and the Siemens Foundation.

To learn more about PAYA and how youth apprenticeship can unlock opportunity for both young people and employers, visit newamerica.org/paya and stay connected to the initiative’s progress following the #PAYA hashtag.

Kate Kreamer, Deputy Executive Director
Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Manager 

Siemens USA CEO Keynotes Advance CTE Fall Meeting

October 26th, 2018

On Tuesday, October 23, Barbara Humpton, CEO of Siemens Foundation gave the keynote address at the Advance CTE 2018 Fall Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland. Humpton’s many responsibilities include managing the company’s strategy and engagement and leading more than 50,000 employees. Humpton began her remarks by emphasizing the importance Siemens places on investing in their employees. The Siemens Foundation has invested more than $100 million in the United States to advance workforce development and education initiatives in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).

Humpton also shared her personal connection to Career Technical Education (CTE). She developed her passion for STEM early in her education and the opportunity to gain experience working directly with IBM inspired her to continue in this area. Humpton’s passion grew as she saw the impact of her work. “What matters to me is the mission, what matters to me is purpose, doing things because they are making a big change in the world,”  she said.

Her search for meaning in her career mirrors the aspiration of learners and their parent’s across the country. She cited The Value and Promise of Career Technical Education: Results from a National Survey of Parents and Students to emphasize this key finding – discovering a career passion is the most important critical goal for both learners and parents– even surpassing having a career that pays well.

Humpton challenged the attendees to work to reach more people and help them see CTE’s true potential. How we talk about CTE is important and continuing to create platforms that share learner success stories and high-quality programs can contribute to changing outdated perceptions.

She closed by stating that this is an important moment for CTE. She encouraged all of us to be bold, to reach out to employers, to discover and utilize the talent in each community and thanked the CTE leaders for their commitment to students and public service.

Nicole Howard, Communications Associate 

Advance CTE Fall Meeting Staff Reflections Part 1

October 26th, 2018

Advance CTE reflects on sessions and activities at the Advance CTE Fall Meeting held earlier this week in Baltimore, Maryland. Learn more about sessions you may have missed in this series. 

Moving Beyond a Seat at the Table

This year’s Fall Meeting included a session called, “Moving Beyond a Seat at the Table: Advancing CTE Through Partnerships and Collaboration” on how state leaders in Career Technical Education (CTE) can build meaningful relationships. Kate Kreamer, Deputy Executive Director of Advance CTE, moderated this session, and encouraged the room to be intentional when building partnerships and evaluate not just the strength of the relationship but also the value.

There were many good points from the panelists, but one that I found particularly compelling was the push to consider whether there are mutual benefits coming out of a partnership. As CTE increasingly gains national traction, leaders in the area are being pulled into a variety of conversations. However, the panelists encouraged us to consider whether we are being included in order to “check a box,” or whether we are gaining anything substantive from each other.

I found the push to consider what we can bring to the table in a partnership, and what type of role our partner can play for our own goals, to be especially valuable. Quality of engagement, instead of quantity, is something that we can all consider as we continue on in our own work.

Meredith Hills, Policy Associate

Equity in CTE

Since I’ve joined Advance CTE’s team in March 2018, equity in CTE has been a constant topic in the office. Advance CTE has reached out to state leaders as well as partner organizations to learn about how we may help state leaders advance equity in CTE. It was exciting to share some of our findings from this outreach with our members during the Building Trust to Ensure Equity in CTE session at Fall Meeting.

The session allowed our members to learn about how Wisconsin is using policy levers to advance equity in CTE for historically marginalized populations and how Oklahoma is promoting a culture in the state agency and teacher workforce that values equity through diversity and inclusion trainings. I’m excited to use the questions and comments from session participants to inform Advance CTE’s future equity briefs.

Brianna McCain, Policy Associate

Discussing Data and Funding at the Fall Meeting

Here are two topics that don’t often get a lot of attention: data and funding. All too often states are constrained by resources, capacity, funding and policy from making any real progress on either front, leaving these two very important issues to take a back seat to more pressing concerns. But all that is beginning to change. In 2017, funding was the number one policy priority across the states – and that’s during a year in which 49 states and Washington, DC collectively passed more than 240 CTE-related policies. The federal government has also increased funding for CTE through the Fiscal Year 2018 and FY 2019 budgets. And with Perkins V implementation on the horizon, states are starting to think very seriously about restructuring their data systems to meet more rigorous expectations for data collection and reporting.

At the Fall Meeting, attendees had the chance to hear from leading states that are using funding and data to improve outcomes for learners. One of the breakout sessions highlighted Tennessee’s efforts to braid funding across a variety of funding streams including the Perkins reserve fund, the state’s Experienced Professional in the Classroom (EPIC) project to support CTE teacher pathways, and the New Skills for Youth initiative. Participants also heard about the North Carolina Community College system’s tiered funding structure, which is designed to incentivize and support programs in high-demand industries.

During a general plenary about using CTE data, participants got to hear a conversation with State CTE Directors facilitated by Elizabeth Dabney of the Data Quality Campaign. Elizabeth talked about common challenges and policy recommendations for making the most of data by building trust, protecting privacy and, most importantly, measuring what matters. State leaders from Hawaii, Ohio and Texas shared some of their own lessons and strategies for using CTE data.

Austin Estes, Senior Associate, Policy

Webinar: The State’s Role in Communicating about CTE

September 10th, 2018

Join Advance CTE on Thursday, September 20 from 2 – 3 p.m. ET for Advance CTE’s webinar, The State’s Role in Communicating About Career Technical Education (CTE). Advance CTE will feature Idaho Career and Technical Education and how they have transformed the way in which they communicate about CTE with all stakeholders. Caty Solace, Outreach and Communications Manager at the Idaho Workforce Development Council, will discuss how Idaho CTE created a statewide brand, introduced storytelling as a major component of their communications plan and the tactical strategies they used to better communicate about the value and promise of CTE across all audiences.

Speakers:

  • Caty Solace, Outreach & Communications Manager, Idaho Workforce Development Council
  • Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Manager, Advance CTE

Register today!

Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Manager 

Legislative Update: Perkins Reauthorization Signed into Law

July 31st, 2018

Today, the President signed the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V), which reauthorizes the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act (Perkins).

As we reported, the House and Senate voted to pass this bill last week. President Trump will travel to Tampa Bay Technical High School this evening to provide remarks about the bill and host a roundtable on workforce development. Watch it live at 6:10 p.m. Eastern Time.

Advance CTE and ACTE released a joint press statement after the President signed H.R. 2353 into law. Check out additional resources on our webpage. To make sure you get the latest news and resources about federal policy that impacts Career Technical Education (CTE), sign up for our Legislative Updates!

Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Manager

 

Series

Archives

1