Global Competencies, CTE & STEM

November 28th, 2018

When students enter the job market, they will need to know the global dimensions of their career pathway and how to work with people from different backgrounds – including here in our increasingly diverse country. Recognizing the incredible opportunities and necessities of linking Career Technical Education (CTE) and global competencies is why Advance CTE partnered with Asia Society, Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) and Longview Foundation to release Preparing a Globally Competent Workforce Through High-Quality Career and Technical Education back in 2015. 

Since the release of this report, this partnership has continued, leading to the development of the Global CTE Toolkit, which houses many curricular and instructional tools for embedding global competencies into CTE teaching and learning.

This work is now extending to focus squarely on STEM, with Advance CTE, the Global Education at Asia Society and ACTE partnering to create new online professional development modules that support CTE educators in integrating STEM content into their classrooms while teaching global skills via active, project-based learning. These 10 new modules – entitled Career Readiness in a Global Economy: STEM and CTE – will help educators understand how to make global connections to local issues; create high-quality global STEM projects; assess global workforce readiness skills; connect with classrooms abroad to complete collaborative projects; and teach students to be project managers so they are more successful in completing their projects.

These new modules, together with sample curriculum and other tools and resources are now being piloted and we are looking for state and local leaders and practitioners to join in and give your feedback. For each 15-minute module you give feedback on, you will be entered into a drawing for one of two $100 Amazon gift cards. All materials are free of charge due to generous support from the Project Management Institute Educational Foundation (PMIEF).

If you are interested in piloting these new materials, please visit CTE Learn, create a free log-in, and click on the Career Readiness in a Global Economy: STEM and CTE, button to get started. Also, feel free to share the link and information with others in your states and communities.

Contact Heather Singmaster at hsingmaster@asiasociety.org with any questions. All surveys must be completed by February 15, 2019 to be entered into the drawing.

Advance CTE Joins the Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeship Initiative

October 29th, 2018

High schools are struggling to prepare young people for today’s economy. Too many students are disengaged and have difficulty navigating their options after graduation. And, many students lack affordable postsecondary opportunities, while a postsecondary education is more important than ever. These challenges make the path to economic security difficult, especially for those facing the persistent racial, gender, and other inequities present in the country today.

At the same time, to compete and grow, employers need to build a sustainable pipeline of workers with adaptable skills. Career Technical Education (CTE) is central to ensuring we align students’ talents and interests with the needs of our economy and employers, and, in recent years, a number of states and communities have developed new youth apprenticeship programs to further expand access to high-quality, career-focused pathways for more learners.

Youth apprenticeship – when designed with quality and equity in mind – allow students to complete high school, start their postsecondary education at no cost, get paid work experience alongside a mentor, and start on a path that broadens their options for the future. However, the policy and practice of youth apprenticeship is still relatively nascent in the United States, necessitating supports and resources for the field.  This is why New America launched the Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeships – or PAYA – a national effort, of which Advance CTE is thrilled to be a part.

The partners of PAYA – Advance CTE, CareerWise Colorado, Charleston Regional Youth Apprenticeships, Education Strategy Group, JFF, the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity, the National Fund for Workforce Solutions, the National Governors Association and New America – will be working together over the next two years to explore the ways youth apprenticeship can be reinvented to better meet the needs of learners and employers.

“We are excited to work on an initiative that will help ensure that each learner has access to a high-quality education and meaningful work-based experiences that provides the skills he or she needs to be successful in a high-wage, in-demand career,” said Kimberly Green, Executive Director of Advance CTE. “PAYA represents a unique blend of policy, practice and research cutting across the national, state and local levels and has the potential for an incredible impact across our country.”

Over the next four years, PAYA will support efforts in states and cities to expand access to high-quality apprenticeship opportunities for high school age youth. PAYA will convene experts and partners, support a community of practitioners, publish research, and provide grants and direct assistance to promising youth apprenticeship programs in cities and states across the U.S.

Advance CTE joins our partners in thanking the funders of this initiative – Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Ballmer Group, Bloomberg Philanthropies, the Joyce Foundation, JP Morgan Chase & Co., and the Siemens Foundation.

To learn more about PAYA and how youth apprenticeship can unlock opportunity for both young people and employers, visit newamerica.org/paya and stay connected to the initiative’s progress following the #PAYA hashtag.

Kate Kreamer, Deputy Executive Director
Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Manager 

Siemens USA CEO Keynotes Advance CTE Fall Meeting

October 26th, 2018

On Tuesday, October 23, Barbara Humpton, CEO of Siemens Foundation gave the keynote address at the Advance CTE 2018 Fall Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland. Humpton’s many responsibilities include managing the company’s strategy and engagement and leading more than 50,000 employees. Humpton began her remarks by emphasizing the importance Siemens places on investing in their employees. The Siemens Foundation has invested more than $100 million in the United States to advance workforce development and education initiatives in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).

Humpton also shared her personal connection to Career Technical Education (CTE). She developed her passion for STEM early in her education and the opportunity to gain experience working directly with IBM inspired her to continue in this area. Humpton’s passion grew as she saw the impact of her work. “What matters to me is the mission, what matters to me is purpose, doing things because they are making a big change in the world,”  she said.

Her search for meaning in her career mirrors the aspiration of learners and their parent’s across the country. She cited The Value and Promise of Career Technical Education: Results from a National Survey of Parents and Students to emphasize this key finding – discovering a career passion is the most important critical goal for both learners and parents– even surpassing having a career that pays well.

Humpton challenged the attendees to work to reach more people and help them see CTE’s true potential. How we talk about CTE is important and continuing to create platforms that share learner success stories and high-quality programs can contribute to changing outdated perceptions.

She closed by stating that this is an important moment for CTE. She encouraged all of us to be bold, to reach out to employers, to discover and utilize the talent in each community and thanked the CTE leaders for their commitment to students and public service.

Nicole Howard, Communications Associate 

Advance CTE Fall Meeting Staff Reflections Part 1

October 26th, 2018

Advance CTE reflects on sessions and activities at the Advance CTE Fall Meeting held earlier this week in Baltimore, Maryland. Learn more about sessions you may have missed in this series. 

Moving Beyond a Seat at the Table

This year’s Fall Meeting included a session called, “Moving Beyond a Seat at the Table: Advancing CTE Through Partnerships and Collaboration” on how state leaders in Career Technical Education (CTE) can build meaningful relationships. Kate Kreamer, Deputy Executive Director of Advance CTE, moderated this session, and encouraged the room to be intentional when building partnerships and evaluate not just the strength of the relationship but also the value.

There were many good points from the panelists, but one that I found particularly compelling was the push to consider whether there are mutual benefits coming out of a partnership. As CTE increasingly gains national traction, leaders in the area are being pulled into a variety of conversations. However, the panelists encouraged us to consider whether we are being included in order to “check a box,” or whether we are gaining anything substantive from each other.

I found the push to consider what we can bring to the table in a partnership, and what type of role our partner can play for our own goals, to be especially valuable. Quality of engagement, instead of quantity, is something that we can all consider as we continue on in our own work.

Meredith Hills, Policy Associate

Equity in CTE

Since I’ve joined Advance CTE’s team in March 2018, equity in CTE has been a constant topic in the office. Advance CTE has reached out to state leaders as well as partner organizations to learn about how we may help state leaders advance equity in CTE. It was exciting to share some of our findings from this outreach with our members during the Building Trust to Ensure Equity in CTE session at Fall Meeting.

The session allowed our members to learn about how Wisconsin is using policy levers to advance equity in CTE for historically marginalized populations and how Oklahoma is promoting a culture in the state agency and teacher workforce that values equity through diversity and inclusion trainings. I’m excited to use the questions and comments from session participants to inform Advance CTE’s future equity briefs.

Brianna McCain, Policy Associate

Discussing Data and Funding at the Fall Meeting

Here are two topics that don’t often get a lot of attention: data and funding. All too often states are constrained by resources, capacity, funding and policy from making any real progress on either front, leaving these two very important issues to take a back seat to more pressing concerns. But all that is beginning to change. In 2017, funding was the number one policy priority across the states – and that’s during a year in which 49 states and Washington, DC collectively passed more than 240 CTE-related policies. The federal government has also increased funding for CTE through the Fiscal Year 2018 and FY 2019 budgets. And with Perkins V implementation on the horizon, states are starting to think very seriously about restructuring their data systems to meet more rigorous expectations for data collection and reporting.

At the Fall Meeting, attendees had the chance to hear from leading states that are using funding and data to improve outcomes for learners. One of the breakout sessions highlighted Tennessee’s efforts to braid funding across a variety of funding streams including the Perkins reserve fund, the state’s Experienced Professional in the Classroom (EPIC) project to support CTE teacher pathways, and the New Skills for Youth initiative. Participants also heard about the North Carolina Community College system’s tiered funding structure, which is designed to incentivize and support programs in high-demand industries.

During a general plenary about using CTE data, participants got to hear a conversation with State CTE Directors facilitated by Elizabeth Dabney of the Data Quality Campaign. Elizabeth talked about common challenges and policy recommendations for making the most of data by building trust, protecting privacy and, most importantly, measuring what matters. State leaders from Hawaii, Ohio and Texas shared some of their own lessons and strategies for using CTE data.

Austin Estes, Senior Associate, Policy

Webinar: The State’s Role in Communicating about CTE

September 10th, 2018

Join Advance CTE on Thursday, September 20 from 2 – 3 p.m. ET for Advance CTE’s webinar, The State’s Role in Communicating About Career Technical Education (CTE). Advance CTE will feature Idaho Career and Technical Education and how they have transformed the way in which they communicate about CTE with all stakeholders. Caty Solace, Outreach and Communications Manager at the Idaho Workforce Development Council, will discuss how Idaho CTE created a statewide brand, introduced storytelling as a major component of their communications plan and the tactical strategies they used to better communicate about the value and promise of CTE across all audiences.

Speakers:

  • Caty Solace, Outreach & Communications Manager, Idaho Workforce Development Council
  • Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Manager, Advance CTE

Register today!

Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Manager 

Legislative Update: Perkins Reauthorization Signed into Law

July 31st, 2018

Today, the President signed the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V), which reauthorizes the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act (Perkins).

As we reported, the House and Senate voted to pass this bill last week. President Trump will travel to Tampa Bay Technical High School this evening to provide remarks about the bill and host a roundtable on workforce development. Watch it live at 6:10 p.m. Eastern Time.

Advance CTE and ACTE released a joint press statement after the President signed H.R. 2353 into law. Check out additional resources on our webpage. To make sure you get the latest news and resources about federal policy that impacts Career Technical Education (CTE), sign up for our Legislative Updates!

Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Manager

Now Recruiting for the Summer 2018 CTE Virtual Institute

June 4th, 2018

Last fall, Advance CTE launched the inaugural Career Technical Education (CTE) Virtual Institute, a web-based course designed to help new audiences become experts on CTE. Participants learned about the history of CTE, addressed common myths and recognized the role they play in supporting a high-quality CTE system.

By the end of the course, each participant also designed and delivered an individual project demonstrating and applying lessons learned. Personal projects included:

  • Developing brochures for guidance counselors that use research-based messages for recruiting students into CTE programs;
  • Publishing a blog post featuring Advance CTE Excellence in Action award winners;
  • Developing a curriculum for a 9th grade career exploration course; and
  • Submitting conference proposals for a statewide CTE conference.

The CTE Virtual Institute provided the space for professionals to come together and collectively unpack the core components of a high-quality CTE system.

Today, we are excited to announce that we are recruiting a second cohort to participate in the Summer 2018 CTE Virtual Institute. The summer course will begin in mid-July and conclude in early September. New this year, participants will be able to engage directly with the foremost thinkers in the field through a series of “brown bag” calls with CTE experts.

If you are interested in joining, please apply by June 15. Otherwise, consider passing this information along to your network and/or staff. Additional details are provided below.

Join the Summer 2018 CTE Virtual Institute

  • Application window: June 4-June 15
  • Where to apply: https://careertech.org/cte-virtual-institute
  • Who should apply: Individuals new to the world of CTE or with limited backgrounds, including practitioners, policymakers, researchers and more.
  • Other details: The course will begin on July 12 and conclude by September 7, 2018. The course will be hosted on Advance CTE’s Moodle site. Click here to view a copy of the course syllabus.

Austin Estes, Senior Policy Associate

The New Fact Sheet on the Role of CTE in Statewide Attainment Goals

May 24th, 2018

More than 40 states have set statewide attainment goals for the percentage of adults holding postsecondary degrees or credentials by a certain year. These efforts have been sparked by Lumina Foundation’s 2025 national credential attainment goal – 60 percent of Americans holding a credential beyond a high school diploma by 2025.

Some states have involved Career Technical Education (CTE) from the onset and others are now looking to ensure CTE is part of their overall strategy. The new fact sheet released by Advance CTE explains why and how CTE can be a major driver of postsecondary attainment across the country.

 

What States Should Do

  • Count ALL Credentials of Value towards Attainment While many learners in CTE programs do go on to earn two- and four-year degrees, many others earn industry-recognized credentials, many of which have great labor market value. States should recognize these credentials in their attainment targets.

  • Leverage Secondary CTE to Meet Statewide Attainment Goals: Increasingly, high school students taking a concentration of CTE are just as likely to go on to postsecondary education as their non-CTE peers – and are more likely to enter with workplace experiences and/or industry-recognized credentials. States should include the expansion of CTE pathways and meaningful college and career advising systems as part of their attainment strategy.

  • Support Postsecondary CTE as a Platform for Credential and Degree Attainment: Postsecondary students enrolled in CTE programs have an average attainment rate of 56.8 percent (counting credentials, certificates and degrees at two-year institutions), well above the average graduation rate for two-year institutions.

  • Bring CTE to the Table as a Partner: A statewide attainment goal can and should serve as the driver of a state’s economic and workforce vision, of which CTE must be a part.

Read more about how Oklahoma, New Jersey and Tennessee have connected the dots between CTE and statewide attainment goals in the new fact sheet.

Kate Kreamer, Deputy Executive Director

New Video To Help You Make The Case For CTE

May 18th, 2018

We are excited to announce a new CTE video as part of the CTE: Learning that works for America® campaign for you to watch and share with your community.

Why Is This Important? 

We know that how we discuss CTE in the media, with policymakers, employers and families matters. We are thrilled to share a new video that showcases what today’s CTE looks like and how it prepares learners for their future careers while closing the skills gap for employers across the country. We know that learners who participate in CTE graduate at a higher rate, are more satisfied with their education, and just as likely as non-CTE students to go on to postsecondary education. Now, it’s time that everyone understands the incredible value of CTE.

How Can You Use This?

This video is designed to help you make the case for CTE in your community and demonstrate the many benefits of today’s CTE! Share it at your statewide meetings, with partners, and encourage your networks to use it too.

We’ve developed a promotional toolkit to get the word out on this video, which you can find here. If you’re curious about the data points in the video, check out our one-pager on the data here.

Join the Conversation: 

To get you started here are two tweets you can share right now, but be sure you are following us on twitter @CTEWorks.

Tweet: I support the work of @CTEWorks as they continue to combat false perceptions of what CTE is and who it is for. This video highlights how CTE prepares learners for success. We hope that you will watch, share and #RT! https://careertech.org/campaign-video #CTEWorks

Tweet: Learn how Career Technical Education prepares learners for their futures while closing the skills gap for employers across the country. https://careertech.org/campaign-video #CTE #CTEWorks

Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Manager 

Excellence in Action Spotlight: Jones County Junior College

April 27th, 2018

Our 2017 Excellence in Action award winner in the Health Science Career Cluster, the Emergency Medical Technical Education (EMTE) program at Jones County Junior College, located in rural Ellisville, MS exemplifies excellence. All learning – in the classroom and workplace – is facilitated by knowledgeable experts leading to program graduates prepared in Health Science careers in areas of critical shortage in rural Southeast Mississippi.

All EMTE students must complete clinical internships in the field. These consist of 500-plus hours of training under the direct guidance of a paramedic, registered nurse, physician, doctor of osteopathy, or equally qualified health care provider. The clinical and field settings provide opportunities for students to begin to observe illnesses and injuries discussed in the classroom, develop and fine-tune diagnostic skills, and put together the overall picture of patient care. Critical to these work-based learning experiences are the highly skilled and knowledgeable experts, called ‘preceptors,’ that lead field and clinical practica. Preceptors guide students during one-on-one encounters throughout their internships, assist participants while at the Human Simulation Center, and give valuable input on current changes in the business of emergency medicine.

Through the course of the program, students are evaluated on their mastery of skills by instructors, clinical/field preceptors, and members of the advisory committee, comprised of nine ambulance services, three hospitals, and the military installation at Camp Shelby.  Without the knowledge and skills of these experts the program could not as effectively evaluate students and their ability to provide patient care.

Learn more about the Emergency Medical Technical Education program at Jones County Junior College and our 2017 award winners.

 

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