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Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: Reviewing and Using Eight Key Indicators of Rigorous Career Technical Education to Improve Programs of Study

May 23rd, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the Career Clusters ® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Scott Warren, Director of State Initiatives, Southern Regional Education Board (SREB)-High Schools that Work. The SREB is located in Atlanta, GA.

Who says rigorous CTE is not key to improving student achievement?  Consider these figures: 17 percent more students meeting college and career readiness goals in reading and science and 13 percent more meeting college and career readiness goals in mathematics.  Where did these percentages come from, you ask?   When High Schools That Work analyzed data from its 2012 national assessment of seniors we found when students had classroom experiences in their CT classrooms they were much more likely to meet college and career readiness standards.  This was true even when the students all took the same academic classes! HSTW_Red_Logo.jpg.tn

High Schools That Work compared two groups of students from the 2012 assessment. The first group included students who experienced more than four of the eight indicators for a rigorous CT course.  We then took a similar group in terms of ethnicity, socio-economic and gender who experienced less than four of these indicators.  The results were staggering.  Even when students took the “right” academic classes, rigorous CT resulted in a significant increase in achievement.  For reading, 63 percent of the students who took a college preparatory academic core but did not experience rigorous CT met college and career readiness goals. However, 80 percent of the students who took that same academic core and had rigorous CT met college and career readiness goals – a 17 percent increase! Similar data holds true for science and mathematics.

In this breakout session on Monday afternoon, participants will learn more about these eight critical CT classroom experiences that make a difference.  Participants will also learn a simple strategy to engage teachers in taking ownership of them by developing tools for leaders to use to look for them in classrooms.

Scott’s breakout is Monday, June 10, 2013 in session B: 3:45 p.m. – 5 p.m. 

More information about the National Career Clusters® Institute

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: FREE Resources for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Cluster Teachers!

May 23rd, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the Career Clusters ® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Sandra Ann Delgado, CTE Associate Project Director, Statewide Instructional Resources Development Center, Austin, TX.SFA

Greetings from Texas and the STATEWIDE INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT CENTER (SIRDC)!  Our team is looking forward to presenting our breakout session at The National Career Clusters® Institute. I can’t wait to share our FREE instructional resources with you. Yes, FREE, no username or password required.

I’ll begin with a little history, but I’ll make it brief because I want to provide you with the opportunity to review our resources before you attend the session! SIRDC is a Texas Education Agency Perkins state leadership grant-funded project that has been awarded to Stephen F. Austin State University. Our current grant team has been in place since June 2011. The purpose of this project is to provide free instructional resources for Texas instructors teaching courses in the following career clusters:

  • Education and Training
  • Hospitality and Tourism
  • Human Services

We service 25 courses within these three clusters and currently have over 180 instructional lessons published on our website http://cte.sfasu.edu/ (additional lessons published monthly). In addition to the basic components, each lesson includes suggestions for special needs and ELL students, connections to core subject matter, reading and writing strategies, CTSO and service learning ideas, and much more.

Other services we provide include 13 FREE teacher online courses, see http://cte.sfasu.edu/course/lifetime-nutrition-and-wellness/, links to additional cluster/course resources, see http://cte.sfasu.edu/rgroup/instructional-practices-in-education/and a monthly newsletter, see http://cte.sfasu.edu/c/newsletters/.

logoTEAIf you have any questions, comments or suggestions, feel free to contact me. We look forward to meeting you on June 12th!

Sandra’s breakout session is June 12, 2013 in session G, 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. . Her co-presenters are Diane Salazar, Statewide CTE Coordinator, Texas Education Agency, Austin,  TX and Lynda Martin, Director, School of Human Sciences, Stephen F. Austin State University, and SFA Grant Program Investigator, Nacogdoches, TX.

More about the National Career Clusters® Institute

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

 

Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: Making your CTE Curriculum Accessible to All Special Populations

May 22nd, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the Career Clusters ® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Lakshmi Mahadevan, Assistant Professor, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, College Station, TX.

Why UDL?Lakshmi

Career and Technical Education instructors are most commonly asked to educate many diverse student populations. Although teaching students with such broad ranges of skills, talents, and interests presents challenges for CTE educators, the nature of CTE programs of study fortunately makes them particularly amenable to the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) approach.

In this session, CTE instructors will be introduced to the UDL principles of multiple means of engagement, representation and action/expression that can be effectively utilized within their classrooms so that all their students, including special populations, can be taught the necessary skills and academic content.

What is UDL?

In general, UDL principles call for the curriculum to be presented in multiple modalities, and students are allowed to demonstrate their learning through a variety of formats. Specifically, a universally designed curriculum overcomes limitations by incorporating three principles of flexibility into its design.

Principle I

The first principle is multiple methods of presentation. UDL courses provide alternative representations of essential concepts, which allow students to learn the information in their preferred means. Examples of alternatives include placing course materials on the Web, allowing students to tape record, using videos, podcasts, and other multimedia.

Principle II

The second principle is using multiple options for participation and engagement. By having flexible teaching strategies and course content, students can choose methods that support their interests and skill levels. For example, assignments and course content may be tied to a current news topic or world event, which allows the instructor to tap into the students’ own interests.

Principle III

The last principle is multiple means of expression. The instructor can let students choose a format through which they demonstrate their knowledge of a subject (for example, doing an oral presentation, a written paper, or taking a test). Allowing choices leads students to multiple opportunities and means of demonstrating mastery of the required material.

What will I get if I attend?SpecialPop

Participants attending this presentation will view videos of CTE instructors incorporating UDL principles into their teaching. In addition, attendees will have an opportunity to access UDL tools for self-assessments, ask questions, and discuss UDL-related best practices with colleagues through a group activity.

Other information (URLs, etc.): For further information about this and other CTE and special populations-related topics, go to: http://ctsp.tamu.edu.

Dr. Mahadevan’s session, Making Your CTE Curriculum Accessible to All Special Populations, will be held Tuesday, June 11, during Session C, 8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. Co-presenter is Dr. Rick Peterson, Associate Professor, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, College Station, TX.

More information about the Career Clusters® Institute

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: All on Board the Engine Driving Wisconsin’s Career Pathways Initiative

May 22nd, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the Career Clusters ® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Marge Rubin, College & Career Pathways Project Coordinator of the Wisconsin Career Pathways Website Project at Fox Valley Technical College, Appleton, WI.CP_Orange_Web

With over 420 school districts in Wisconsin, each governed by a separate school board, how does a state get everyone involved in moving forward with developing Programs of Study?  By building a dynamic, data-driven Web site at www.WICareerPathways.org!  The site integrates development of secondary-to-postsecondary Programs of Study with students’ Plans of Study within Wisconsin’s Career Clusters’® framework.  Supported by the Wisconsin Technical College System through Perkins funding, a large inclusive cross-functional project team kicked off this initiative in 2008 and came up with a multi-phased plan.  Fox Valley Technical College took the lead on behalf of all 16 technical colleges to design and develop the Web site.

Our first step included arranging occupations and postsecondary programs by clusters and pathways.  Each cluster has its own webpage containing a brief description and links to the pathways within the cluster. Each pathway is presented on a separate webpage.  We created a web-based interactive tool that moves developers through a step-by-step process to create a visual depiction of a Program of Study.  Users can also access Wisconsin’s program-of study implementation guide and search and view a repository of published programs of study.

During the second phase, a site to help middle and high school students explore colleges and careers was developed.  By setting up an account at www.WICareerPathways/Students, students are driven to the Student Interest Survey for Career Clusters®.  After completing the survey, students land in a secure portal called MiLocker where a customized summary named MiClusters lists the 16 Career Clusters® in rank order based on survey results.  From the MiClusters listing, students can explore the 16 Career Clusters® and drill down into career pathways.  From the career pathways webpages, students can explore

  • Majors/programs of Wisconsin’s higher education sectors
  • An ample amount of specific career information
  • Programs of study from their high schools

With one easy click, students can turn a Program of Study created by their high school into their personal Plan of Study, which they can edit to reflect their personal path and save in MiLocker.  School counselors can guide students as they use the student site, assist in creating an online Plan of Study, and share the student site during student/parent conferences.

During the third phase, we turned our attention to the needs of middle and high school counselors.  Counselors can log in to a secure portal to access school-wide and individual student Web site activity.  The best-ever feature is that counselors can view what students have in their MiLocker profile, including Plans of Study.

The advantage of a web-based resource is that it allows for ongoing development.  What’s next?  We are expanding the site to include features for business and industry to connect with students.  Stay tuned!

Marge Rubin’s breakout session, All on Board the Engine Driving Wisconsin’s Career Pathways Initiative!, will be held Wednesday, June 12 from 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. Rubin’s co-presenters are Jennifer Wagner, K-12 Relations Manager, Moraine Park Technical College, Fond du Lac, WI, and Jay Stulo, Director-Learning Innovations & Technology, Appleton, WI.

More about the Career Clusters® Institute

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: Building Strategic Alliances with Business/Industry, Workforce Development, and Economic Development

May 14th, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the National Career Clusters® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers, and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Gregg Christensen, Entrepreneurship and Career Education Specialist, Nebraska Department of Education, Lincoln, NE.

Building Strategic Alliances with Business/Industry, Workforce Development, and Economic Development

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Nebraska Career Education
SYSTEM

Business-Industry Linkages…

Partnering with Workforce Development and Economic Development

Stakeholder Involvement…

Do all these sound like familiar themes related to Career Technical Education?  It’s easy to give lip service to them, but difficult to make a reality in effective and efficient ways.

Bringing together key partners to achieve buy-in, support and advocacy for important career technical education initiatives and projects has never been more crucial. The bottom line for many business and industry professionals is that they feel called upon for money, equipment, and advice, but not really “heard.”

Workforce Development and Economic Development agencies have different missions, different measures of success, and different “alphabet soups” of programs and initiatives.  Bridging that divide is difficult but doable.

Engagement of key stakeholders has to be more than a surface “bring ‘em in, talk at ‘em and let ‘em go” exercise to meet a state or federal requirement.  Identifying who needs to be at the table, why they would want to be there, and what they (and you) will gain from working together is crucial, but an often overlooked step.

This session will share best practices for building strategic alliances with diverse group and review examples of strategic alliances built by the Nebraska Career Education (NCE) team and explore the tangible outcomes of these NCE system-driven collaborations including:

  • Nebraska Standards for Career Ready Practice
  • Career Readiness Modules
  • Professional Development Modules
  • H3 Website
  • Preparation for Tomorrow Food and Nutritional Sciences project

Gregg’s breakout session, Building Strategic Alliances with Business/Industry, Workforce Development, and Economic Development is Monday, June 10 from 3:35 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: Exposing and Engaging Students in Careers

May 13th, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the National Career Clusters® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers, and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Terry Carlile, Director, TLC Workforce Solutions.

How are you preparing students in the competitive job market? Whose pipeline are we filing? Gaining the effective partnerships of local employers for workforce exposure and training remains the key attribute of successful career programs. Learn how youth’s career interest assessment and the local high demand career outlook was meshed together to provide a training platform.40117489_scaled_137x189

How to partner with workforce, educators and businesses for win-win-win scenarios will be the highlight of this subject. I’ve worked in the trenches of at-risk youth workforce programs and will share the reality of “how to”. It’ll be a fast, fun, informative and practical 1 hour and 25 minute excursion.

Resource:   www.tlcworkforcesolutions.com

Terry Carlile’s breakout session, Exposing and Engaging Students in Careers, will be held Wednesday, June 12 from 8:30 a.m. – 9:55 a.m.

 Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

 

Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: A Vision for the 21st: Industry and High School Collaboration in Optics

May 10th, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the National Career Clusters® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers, and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Logan Newman, Ophthalmic Fabrication Teacher at East High School in the Rochester City School District, New York. Newman

Having been teachers in the Rochester City School District in New York for 12 years there are specific things we have noticed about our economically troubled area. Below are some important facts:

Fact: According to New York State data, 45.5% of students who start 9th grade graduate high school after 4 years (2008 data)

Fact: According to NYS education department data only 5% of students are college or career ready

Fact: Students who participate in a Career Technical Experience (CTE) program are 3 times more likely to graduate from High School than a student with no CTE classes.

Fact: The Monroe County workforce data states that 39% of the current workforce and 26% of new hires have basic skill deficiencies

Fact: As many as 60 percent of the children described as “problem learners” have vision problems (American Optometric Association)

Fact: Students from economically disadvantaged families (we have the highest poverty rate of all school districts in NYS) who need glasses have opportunities to get free ones, but it requires they miss time from school, resulting in greater loss of education.

Fact: A teacher at our building (me) had experience and an associate’s degree in opticianary, but no materials to make glasses and no class was offered or developed to teach it

Taking these facts together gave us some insights into what we could do to make a difference within our school and community. Our community needs skilled workers to work in the ophthalmic fabrication industry and our students need both skills for available jobs and glasses to be able to see and improve their education classes. Unfortunately, funds to purchase the tools for these programs aren’t in most education budgets. Fortunately, a grant was offered to us that did allow us to develop our plan.

Using the money from the grant we purchased materials for an ophthalmic fabrication lab (photo of lab at right). We taught a small group of students the skills of opticians and developed a full year class curriculum.room

During this full year course students have learned about the shape of the eye, why people need glasses, how to correct vision with glasses, and how to make glasses. They have learned about face shape and frame selection, as well as lens selection and needs for patients.

Students in the program are working with students within the building who need eyeglass repair and fitting. Within the next several months they will begin manufacturing glasses for students who need vision correction help.

Erie Community College in Williamsville, NY has one of two Ophthalmic Dispensing degree programs in New York State. Seven of the 20 graduating seniors who have taken the high school course applied, and were accepted, into the ECC program. Because of the partnership we have formed with ECC they will be forgiven a second semester fabrication class, helping the students save time and money.

tourStudents have also had the opportunity to talk with employees of Rochester Optical, as well as touring their production facility and dispensing shop. Students stated the time was useful because they got to see the skills they were using in class in use as a job. (Photo of group tour at right)

Our next step is to enroll juniors into a second year of the program and have them work with optometrists and student-patients. This second year will focus on making glasses for students who need them, learning how to deal with patients, and preparing for job opportunities. (In photo below, students are practicing taking pupillary measurements)

I’m hoping that, as you read this, you thought to yourself: “Wow! This is a great idea and I can see something like this in my area!” Your assignment between the time you read this and the time we meet is to look for local industry in your area and see what you might be able to link to your school to help your students.pupillary

Logan Neman’s breakout session, A Vision for the 21st: Industry and High School Collaboration in Optics, will be held Wednesday, June 12 from 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. Newman’s co-presenter is Paul Conrow, Teacher of Precision Optical Fabrication. 

East High School is an urban high school in Rochester, NY that is collaborating with local optics companies to help meet the high demand for optical technicians in the local economy. With state grant money, the school has created two lab spaces where students may learn ophthalmics (making prescription glasses) or precision optical fabrication (machining precision lenses for telescopes, cameras, etc.) using the machines and instruments found in industry. High school courses designed with input from local experts can simultaneously help students and the local economy succeed.

More about the National Career Clusters® Institute

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: LPSCS and GPA Resources from the Texas Education Agency and the University of North Texas

May 9th, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the National Career Clusters Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers, and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Amber O’Casey, the Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security (LPSCS) and Government and Public Administration (GPA) Career Cluster Specialist at the University of North Texas.

logoTEA

 

LPSCS and GPA Resources from the Texas Education Agency and the University of North Texas

Would you like to save time and money? Are you looking for lesson ideas, project-based activities, or professional development? Are you an LPSCS or GPA educator? Then join us as we discuss the Texas Education Agency (TEA) Educational Excellence grant resources and instructional materials provided on the University of North Texas (UNT) Career and Technical Education (CTE) website.

Here are some of the materials that we will discuss:

  • Professional development modules that are based on research and experience and focus on “best practices” in education
  • Over 180 GPA and LPSCS secondary lesson plans that are standards- and project-based
  • Elementary and Middle School GPA/LPSCS career awareness curricula
  • Cluster-specific Implementation Guides
  • Cluster-specific Scope and Sequence documents
  • Tools for accommodating learning differences
  • And more…

All of the session attendees will leave with an understanding of the GPA and LPSCS resources and hardcopies of a GPA lesson, an LPSCS lesson, and a quick guide to our lesson plan template.

Amber’s breakout session,LPSCS and GPA Resources from the Texas Education Agency and the University of North Texas” is Tuesday, June 11, 3:45 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

More about the National Career Clusters® Institute

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series – Partner Series: Partnerships in a Career Pathways System

May 3rd, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the Career Clusters ® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June.

Today we are sharing the final installment of the Institute Pre Sessions. Attendees can register for a Pre Session and attend the Sunday or Monday before the Institute begins. There is a nominal fee to attend these sessions and registration can be made in addition to general registration online. There are several topics to choose from.Print

Highlighted Pre Session: Partner Series: Partnerships in a Career Pathways System  

The Center for Occupational Research and Development (CORD) and the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc) recently collaborated on the development of the book, The Career Pathways Effect: Linking Education and Economic Prosperity. CORD and NASDCTEc have developed a series of professional development workshops based on the major themes of the book to support practitioners in the implementation or improvement of career pathways. The preconference “Partnerships in a Career Pathways System” is from the Partner Series Workshops. A career pathways system requires multiple partnerships within a community. This workshop is designed to help you develop or improve your partnerships. Workshop topics include:

  • Partnership Advantages
  • Partner Identification
  • Goal Setting
  • Model Structures
  • Partner Roles and Responsibilities
  • Action Plan Development
  • Partnership Management – Operating and Sustaining

Participants identify strategies and processes to improve their partnerships. Different stakeholders from your local partnerships are encouraged to attend this workshop together but it is not a requirement. Participants will also receive a copy of The Career Pathways Effect: Linking Education and Economic Prosperity book as a participant.

Fee: $200

Date and Time: Monday, June 10 8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Already registered? You can add a Pre Session even if you’ve already registered. If you have questions, please send them to [email protected] and we will be happy to add a Pre Session to your registration.

The National Career Clusters® Institute is June 9-12 at the Omni Fort Worth, 1300 Houston Street, Fort Worth, TX 76102

More information about the National Career Clusters® Institute

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

 

Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: Become a Career Advising Idol

May 3rd, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the Career Clusters ® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June.

Today we are sharing an Institute Pre Session. Attendees can register for a Pre Session and attend the Sunday or Monday before the Institute begins. There is a nominal fee to attend these sessions and registration can be made in addition to general registration online. There are several topics to choose from.Print

Highlighted Pre Session: Become a Career Advising Idol  

Make colleagues idolize your commitment to excellence and clients worship the guidance you give, simply by engaging in professional development that focuses on career advising. No matter your occupation or intended level of understanding career guidance, Kuder, Inc. will help you quickly grow with flexible online training.

By attending this session, you’ll learn about Kuder’s new Career Advisor Training program that offers three course options to fit the schedules of busy professionals. The program covers the 12 core competencies of career development, which are also used by the National Career Development Association (NCDA) and Kuder® Career Development Facilitator Training™ curriculum, in a fast-paced, condensed format requiring an investment of only 10, 30, or 40 course hours. This signature training program lays the foundation for supporting and guiding students and adults in making informed career decisions throughout their lifetimes.KuderAnniv

Fee: This is a seminar; there are no fees to attend.

When: June 9, 2013

Time: June 9, 1 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Already registered? You can add a Pre Session even if you’ve already registered. If you have questions, please send them to [email protected] and we will be happy to add a Pre Session to your registration.

The National Career Clusters® Institute is June 9-12 at the Omni Fort Worth, 1300 Houston Street, Fort Worth, TX 76102

More information about the National Career Clusters® Institute

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

 

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