Archive for May, 2013

Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: Real World in the Classroom

Friday, May 31st, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the Career Clusters ® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Jennifer Robinson, Program Director of InVEST

InVEST, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, has been providing real world skills and knowledge to high school students for decades, enabling them to enter careers in the insurance industry after graduation, and arming them with powerful consumer knowledge.

Students who have gone through the InVEST program have received almost $600,000 in scholarship dollars, landed insurance careers in their areas and continue to be top notch insurance consumer. How does this work?

View this brief video to see the inside of an InVEST program in St. Petersburg, Fla. and understand more about the benefits to students of the free program. Learn more by visiting InVEST at www.investprogram.org or their student website at www.learninsurance.org.

Jennifer Robinson, InVEST program director, will be hosting an in depth session about the InVEST program at the 2013 National Career Clusters Institute on June 11th at 10:00 am titled “Insurance Education and Career Training for Free.

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

By Kate Blosveren Kreamer in Career Clusters®
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Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: Infusing Entrepreneurship Education across the Career Clusters

Friday, May 31st, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the Career Clusters ® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Gregg Christensen, Entrepreneurship and Career Education Specialist at the Nebraska Department of Education.

43%, 42%, 91%…

Why Infuse Entrepreneurship Education throughout CTE?: The end game of career technical education is to help students achieve greater success in college and career.  In the minds of many though, career conjures up the image of a job working for someone else. The reality is that career technical education should embrace both employment (a job) and entrepreneurship.

Most new jobs created in the United States come from the creative efforts of entrepreneurs engaged in endeavors ranging from micro-businesses to large scale ventures. But, our lead in innovation and entrepreneurship in the global economy is narrowing. Other countries are catching up and surpassing us. Case in point: In 2009, 51% of U.S. patents were awarded to non-U.S. companies.

How can CTE Embrace Entrepreneurship and Innovation?: E4 is a tagline used by the Nebraska Entrepreneurship Task Force (NETForce) to describe the mission to “Educate, Engage and Empower Entrepreneurs.” NETForce is an actively engaged group of collaborating partners focused on the high income, high skill and high demand entrepreneurial career opportunities available to youth and adults. Nebraska Career Education (NCE) is one of those partners.

This session will share examples of how NCE and other NETForce members have strategically and intentionally worked to infuse entrepreneurship education at all levels, K-16 through adult. You will also learn about the exciting new entrepreneurial talent assessment for high school aged youth that is being piloted in Nebraska. After completing the assessment, each student will receive a confidential, customized report that explains how he or she can develop each of 10 entrepreneurial talents and apply his or her entrepreneurial style to succeed in an entrepreneurial role and tap into their entrepreneurial energy. Students will be able to use this information in school, in any career, or in starting a new business. The goal is to offer it nationwide in 2014.

So, do young people and adults see entrepreneurship as a career choice?: Back to the percentages from the start of the blog. Gallup surveyed 1,217 U.S. students in the fifth through 12th grades in 2012 about their business and entrepreneurial intentions as part of their HOPE Index.

The results support infusing entrepreneurship education across all career clusters:

Gregg’s breakout session is Tuesday, June 11 from 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

 

By Kate Blosveren Kreamer in Career Clusters®
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Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: Business – Industry Certification (BIC): CTE Programs that Provide 21st Century Skills

Thursday, May 30th, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the Career Clusters ® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Randy Swann, Education Administrator, Alabama State Department of Education.

The Alabama State Department of Education, Office of Career and Technical Education/Workforce Development partnered with business and industry to develop a certification process that establishes and maintains a quality-oriented accountability system for the improvement and enhancement of Career Technical Education (CTE). All CTE programs must participate in an annual local evaluation for business/industry certification (BIC). BIC promotes program improvement that enhances the preparedness of Alabama’s students for society and tomorrow’s workforce. AL

Alabama requires all CTE programs to certify to industry standards, either through the state’s BIC process or through a national certification process. The BIC process is certified to standards as developed by the International Organization for Standardization (“ISO”) and these standards are referred to as ISO 9001:2000 certification.

The ISO 9001:2000 certification is process-based and recognizes organizations that link business objectives with operating effectiveness. ISO indicates that CTE demonstrates effective implementation of BIC documentation and records management; has the commitment of top management to local career and technical programs; has established clear policies; conducts good planning and implementation; performs good resource management; and has efficient process control, measurement, and analysis. The ISO certification ensures that the BIC process is quality-oriented, consistently administered, and focused on customer satisfaction. The purpose of BIC is to ensure that CTE programs meet industry standards so that students will be equipped for postsecondary education, apprenticeship, employment, and life.

For more information, please go to Alabama’s Department of Education Web site.

Randy’s breakout session is Tuesday, June 11, 2013 in Session E, 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

By Ramona in Career Clusters®, National Career Clusters Institute
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Sequestration in Three Minutes

Tuesday, May 28th, 2013

NDD United  is a coalition of organizations and associations committed to saving nondefense discretionary (NDD) programs, such as education, health care, research and others, from additional cuts at the federal level.  The coalition, of which the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium (NADSCTEc) is a member, has recently released a clever and effective video describing sequestration in just under three minutes.

For more information on NDD United and how to spread their message, see this Toolkit.

On Twitter? On Thursday May 30, join NDD United’s Twitter Storm using #nomorecuts!

Kate Blosveren, Associate Executive Director

By Kate Blosveren Kreamer in Uncategorized
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Legislative Update: Drop in Per Pupil Spending for Public Elementary and Secondary Systems

Friday, May 24th, 2013

Duncan Testifies on FY14 Budget at House Education and the Workforce Committee Hearing

This week, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan testified before the House Education and the Workforce Committee on the FY14 budget. Members of Congress focused their questions mostly on student loans but also discussed topics such as the No Child Left Behind waivers, early childhood education, and the Common Core State Standards.

Though Career Technical Education (CTE) was not a primary point of discussion, Representative Joe Heck (R-NV) pressed Secretary Duncan on the U.S. Department of Education’s proposed Blueprint. He expressed concerns about the hold harmless provision and asked Duncan if CTE funds would be reallocated if the proposed Blueprint is passed. Secretary Duncan did not provide a detailed response but welcomed conversation on the issue. Staff is connecting with Representative Heck’s office and encourages State Directors to make outreach to their Representatives on CTE issues.

FY14 Appropriations: House 302(b) Allocations Update

As reported last week, the House Appropriations Committee released their draft FY14 302(b) allocations which suggest devastating cuts for programs with funding allocated under the Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (Labor-HHS-Education) including CTE.

On Tuesday, the House Appropriations Committee held a markup and approved the allocations with acknowledgement that changes are needed. Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers (R-KY) stated that, “Sequestration is taking a huge toll on discretionary spending, leaving us with this very low topline number. Yet our hands are tied, and we must try and make do with the level we have right now. It is my sincere hope that there will soon be a budget compromise that will undo the damaging sequestration law and give us a single, common top-line allocation with the Senate.”

Representatives Nita Lowey (D-NY) and Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) offered amendments to the FY14 budget that were each rejected on a party line vote.

Sequestration Update

Representative Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), Ranking Member of the House Budget Committee, introduced an updated sequestration replacement bill on behalf of House Democrats – the same plan offered by Representative DeLauro at the House Appropriations Committee markup. The bill would replace all sequestration cuts through FY14 with a balanced plan containing $181 billion in deficit reduction through half revenue and half spending cuts.

Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Mark Udall (D-CO) continue to promote S.465, a bill that would allow agency heads to propose how sequester cuts would be divided for programs in their agency and submit to the Senate Appropriations Committee for approval. Without approval from the Committee, the current sequestration cuts would remain in effect for the agency. This approach would not eliminate the cuts but reshuffle them and could result in education programs competing with one another for funding. Senate Appropriations Chairman Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) has disagreed with this approach and is instead calling for the elimination or replacement of sequester cuts.

Drop in Per Pupil Spending for Public Elementary and Secondary SystemsU.S. Census Bureau

The U.S. Census Bureau this week released an analysis on public education finances. As noted in the report and indicated in the chart, FY11 saw the first drop in per pupil expenditures for public elementary and secondary school students – down 1.1 percent from $595.1 billion between 2010 and 2011 -  since 1997.

Kara Herbertson, Research and Policy Manager

By Kara in Uncategorized

McKinsey Report Outlines Common Elements of Innovative Programs to Close the Skills Gap

Friday, May 24th, 2013

The McKinsey Center for Government surveyed 8,000 individuals – from employers to educational institutions to students – to answer one question: how can we close the skills gap? Their results include an examination of more than 100 innovative programs and suggest many strategies already implemented through Career Technical Education (CTE).

The McKinsey Global Institute estimates that by 2020 there will be a global shortfall of 85 million high- and middle-skilled workers. Nearly 40 percent of employers find that applicants lack the skills needed for entry-level jobs. And while 72 percent of education providers reported that graduates are ready to enter the job market, only 42 percent of employers and 45 percent of youth agreed. On top of this disconnect, the authors indicate that there is no comprehensive data on skills required for employment or on the performance of specific education providers in building those skills.

The report identifies common elements of innovative and effective programs, many of which reflect aspects of CTE as laid out in Reflect, Transform, Lead: A New Vision for Career Technical Education, including:

What is needed to close this knowledge and skills gap? Again, the authors suggest improvements that align with the work that many state and local CTE stakeholders are already putting into action:

Access the full report here.

Kara Herbertson, Research and Policy Manager

By Kara in Research, Resources
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Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: Reviewing and Using Eight Key Indicators of Rigorous Career Technical Education to Improve Programs of Study

Thursday, May 23rd, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the Career Clusters ® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Scott Warren, Director of State Initiatives, Southern Regional Education Board (SREB)-High Schools that Work. The SREB is located in Atlanta, GA.

Who says rigorous CTE is not key to improving student achievement?  Consider these figures: 17 percent more students meeting college and career readiness goals in reading and science and 13 percent more meeting college and career readiness goals in mathematics.  Where did these percentages come from, you ask?   When High Schools That Work analyzed data from its 2012 national assessment of seniors we found when students had classroom experiences in their CT classrooms they were much more likely to meet college and career readiness standards.  This was true even when the students all took the same academic classes! HSTW_Red_Logo.jpg.tn

High Schools That Work compared two groups of students from the 2012 assessment. The first group included students who experienced more than four of the eight indicators for a rigorous CT course.  We then took a similar group in terms of ethnicity, socio-economic and gender who experienced less than four of these indicators.  The results were staggering.  Even when students took the “right” academic classes, rigorous CT resulted in a significant increase in achievement.  For reading, 63 percent of the students who took a college preparatory academic core but did not experience rigorous CT met college and career readiness goals. However, 80 percent of the students who took that same academic core and had rigorous CT met college and career readiness goals – a 17 percent increase! Similar data holds true for science and mathematics.

In this breakout session on Monday afternoon, participants will learn more about these eight critical CT classroom experiences that make a difference.  Participants will also learn a simple strategy to engage teachers in taking ownership of them by developing tools for leaders to use to look for them in classrooms.

Scott’s breakout is Monday, June 10, 2013 in session B: 3:45 p.m. – 5 p.m. 

More information about the National Career Clusters® Institute

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

By Ramona in Career Clusters®, National Career Clusters Institute
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Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: FREE Resources for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Cluster Teachers!

Thursday, May 23rd, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the Career Clusters ® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Sandra Ann Delgado, CTE Associate Project Director, Statewide Instructional Resources Development Center, Austin, TX.SFA

Greetings from Texas and the STATEWIDE INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT CENTER (SIRDC)!  Our team is looking forward to presenting our breakout session at The National Career Clusters® Institute. I can’t wait to share our FREE instructional resources with you. Yes, FREE, no username or password required.

I’ll begin with a little history, but I’ll make it brief because I want to provide you with the opportunity to review our resources before you attend the session! SIRDC is a Texas Education Agency Perkins state leadership grant-funded project that has been awarded to Stephen F. Austin State University. Our current grant team has been in place since June 2011. The purpose of this project is to provide free instructional resources for Texas instructors teaching courses in the following career clusters:

We service 25 courses within these three clusters and currently have over 180 instructional lessons published on our website http://cte.sfasu.edu/ (additional lessons published monthly). In addition to the basic components, each lesson includes suggestions for special needs and ELL students, connections to core subject matter, reading and writing strategies, CTSO and service learning ideas, and much more.

Other services we provide include 13 FREE teacher online courses, see http://cte.sfasu.edu/course/lifetime-nutrition-and-wellness/, links to additional cluster/course resources, see http://cte.sfasu.edu/rgroup/instructional-practices-in-education/and a monthly newsletter, see http://cte.sfasu.edu/c/newsletters/.

logoTEAIf you have any questions, comments or suggestions, feel free to contact me. We look forward to meeting you on June 12th!

Sandra’s breakout session is June 12, 2013 in session G, 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. . Her co-presenters are Diane Salazar, Statewide CTE Coordinator, Texas Education Agency, Austin,  TX and Lynda Martin, Director, School of Human Sciences, Stephen F. Austin State University, and SFA Grant Program Investigator, Nacogdoches, TX.

More about the National Career Clusters® Institute

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

 

By Ramona in Career Clusters®, National Career Clusters Institute
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Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: Making your CTE Curriculum Accessible to All Special Populations

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the Career Clusters ® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Lakshmi Mahadevan, Assistant Professor, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, College Station, TX.

Why UDL?Lakshmi

Career and Technical Education instructors are most commonly asked to educate many diverse student populations. Although teaching students with such broad ranges of skills, talents, and interests presents challenges for CTE educators, the nature of CTE programs of study fortunately makes them particularly amenable to the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) approach.

In this session, CTE instructors will be introduced to the UDL principles of multiple means of engagement, representation and action/expression that can be effectively utilized within their classrooms so that all their students, including special populations, can be taught the necessary skills and academic content.

What is UDL?

In general, UDL principles call for the curriculum to be presented in multiple modalities, and students are allowed to demonstrate their learning through a variety of formats. Specifically, a universally designed curriculum overcomes limitations by incorporating three principles of flexibility into its design.

Principle I

The first principle is multiple methods of presentation. UDL courses provide alternative representations of essential concepts, which allow students to learn the information in their preferred means. Examples of alternatives include placing course materials on the Web, allowing students to tape record, using videos, podcasts, and other multimedia.

Principle II

The second principle is using multiple options for participation and engagement. By having flexible teaching strategies and course content, students can choose methods that support their interests and skill levels. For example, assignments and course content may be tied to a current news topic or world event, which allows the instructor to tap into the students’ own interests.

Principle III

The last principle is multiple means of expression. The instructor can let students choose a format through which they demonstrate their knowledge of a subject (for example, doing an oral presentation, a written paper, or taking a test). Allowing choices leads students to multiple opportunities and means of demonstrating mastery of the required material.

What will I get if I attend?SpecialPop

Participants attending this presentation will view videos of CTE instructors incorporating UDL principles into their teaching. In addition, attendees will have an opportunity to access UDL tools for self-assessments, ask questions, and discuss UDL-related best practices with colleagues through a group activity.

Other information (URLs, etc.): For further information about this and other CTE and special populations-related topics, go to: http://ctsp.tamu.edu.

Dr. Mahadevan’s session, Making Your CTE Curriculum Accessible to All Special Populations, will be held Tuesday, June 11, during Session C, 8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. Co-presenter is Dr. Rick Peterson, Associate Professor, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, College Station, TX.

More information about the Career Clusters® Institute

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

By Ramona in Career Clusters®, National Career Clusters Institute
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Career Clusters® Institute Blog Series: All on Board the Engine Driving Wisconsin’s Career Pathways Initiative

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

This blog series provides readers with insight on the valuable content that is being shared at the Career Clusters ® Institute. Guest bloggers are among teachers, faculty, researchers and other experts that will present at the national gathering in Fort Worth, TX in June. Today’s guest blogger is Marge Rubin, College & Career Pathways Project Coordinator of the Wisconsin Career Pathways Website Project at Fox Valley Technical College, Appleton, WI.CP_Orange_Web

With over 420 school districts in Wisconsin, each governed by a separate school board, how does a state get everyone involved in moving forward with developing Programs of Study?  By building a dynamic, data-driven Web site at www.WICareerPathways.org!  The site integrates development of secondary-to-postsecondary Programs of Study with students’ Plans of Study within Wisconsin’s Career Clusters’® framework.  Supported by the Wisconsin Technical College System through Perkins funding, a large inclusive cross-functional project team kicked off this initiative in 2008 and came up with a multi-phased plan.  Fox Valley Technical College took the lead on behalf of all 16 technical colleges to design and develop the Web site.

Our first step included arranging occupations and postsecondary programs by clusters and pathways.  Each cluster has its own webpage containing a brief description and links to the pathways within the cluster. Each pathway is presented on a separate webpage.  We created a web-based interactive tool that moves developers through a step-by-step process to create a visual depiction of a Program of Study.  Users can also access Wisconsin’s program-of study implementation guide and search and view a repository of published programs of study.

During the second phase, a site to help middle and high school students explore colleges and careers was developed.  By setting up an account at www.WICareerPathways/Students, students are driven to the Student Interest Survey for Career Clusters®.  After completing the survey, students land in a secure portal called MiLocker where a customized summary named MiClusters lists the 16 Career Clusters® in rank order based on survey results.  From the MiClusters listing, students can explore the 16 Career Clusters® and drill down into career pathways.  From the career pathways webpages, students can explore

With one easy click, students can turn a Program of Study created by their high school into their personal Plan of Study, which they can edit to reflect their personal path and save in MiLocker.  School counselors can guide students as they use the student site, assist in creating an online Plan of Study, and share the student site during student/parent conferences.

During the third phase, we turned our attention to the needs of middle and high school counselors.  Counselors can log in to a secure portal to access school-wide and individual student Web site activity.  The best-ever feature is that counselors can view what students have in their MiLocker profile, including Plans of Study.

The advantage of a web-based resource is that it allows for ongoing development.  What’s next?  We are expanding the site to include features for business and industry to connect with students.  Stay tuned!

Marge Rubin’s breakout session, All on Board the Engine Driving Wisconsin’s Career Pathways Initiative!, will be held Wednesday, June 12 from 8:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. Rubin’s co-presenters are Jennifer Wagner, K-12 Relations Manager, Moraine Park Technical College, Fond du Lac, WI, and Jay Stulo, Director-Learning Innovations & Technology, Appleton, WI.

More about the Career Clusters® Institute

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

By Ramona in Career Clusters®, National Career Clusters Institute

 

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