Archive for January, 2016

This Week in CTE

Friday, January 29th, 2016

TWEET OF THE WEEK

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE WEEK

236 students across the country were nominated for the 2016 inaugural class of Presidential Scholars in CTE. See who was nominated from your state.

RESOURCE OF THE WEEK

Workforce Data Quality Campaign launched their online state pages resource featuring information about higher education and workforce data in each of the 50 states and D.C. Learn more.

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

The AT&T/DECA Mentoring Project released a video this week showcasing the impact the mentoring project has made in its first year, providing more than 31,000 hours of mentoring to 11,500 students in 20 schools across the United States. Watch the video.

REPORT OF THE WEEK

America’s Promise Alliance released the 2016 Building a Grad Nation Data Brief, which provides an overview of the 2013-2014 high school graduation rates across the country. While the nation hit a record 82.3 percent graduation rate in 2014, there are still major discrepancies in graduation rates for minority students, those from low-income families, and students with disabilities. Read the report.

Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Associate 

By Katie Fitzgerald in News, Publications, Research, Resources

Welcome Rita Johnson, Kansas’ Newest State CTE Director!

Thursday, January 28th, 2016

Rita Johnson, Kansas’ newest State CTE Director, has had a lifelong career in education. She began teaching in 1973, and after a stint as an executive assistant and office manager outside of the education sector, Johnson returned and served in a variety of roles including business and computer studies coordinator, college competency-based curriculum specialist, director of admissions and student affairs, director of administrative services and as an institutional effectiveness specialist. While serving in these roles she also managed the Carl D. Perkins grants for both a large urban school district as well as the local technical college. After working on the Perkins grant for a number of years, Johnson made the leap to the Kansas Board of Regents, where she had to quickly shift focus from a local to state perspective, further expanding her growth and knowledge of Career Technical Education (CTE). Now as the Regents Vice President for Workforce Development and Perkins State Director, Johnson is witnessing a resurgence in strategies that were popular when she began her career such as work-based learning, employer engagement and apprenticeships.

While the role of employer engagement in CTE remains a priority, her major focus is strengthening the connection between secondary and postsecondary education programs throughout the state. Though students should absolutely have a broader-based education and the chance to explore a variety of careers and pathways in high school, Johnson wants to ensure there are realistic intersections to pathways where learners have a multitude of options. Pathways should enable high school graduates to continue their education or jump into the workforce with the ability to re-enter the education system at any time to gain more skills as they advance through their careers. “Students should be able to find a pathway that is within their passion and interest,” said Johnson. “As they explore a wide swath of careers, I hope we strengthen these connections so that students can see a pathway to where they want to go.” In addition to creating strong pathways, Johnson described the work to be done in educating students, parents and guidance counselors about the vast opportunities that CTE provides.

As Johnson reinforced the idea that education should be a lifelong pursuit, it was clear this concept is evident in her own life as she describe her excitement at beginning this new chapter as the State CTE Director in Kansas.

Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Associate 

By Katie Fitzgerald in Advance CTE Announcements
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Inside International CTE: South Korea

Tuesday, January 26th, 2016

This is part of our ongoing series examining international education systems in partnership with Asia Society’s Global Learning blog on EdWeek 

Last week Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker proposed an increase of $83.5 million for career and technical education (CTE or VET—vocational education and training—as it is called in most other countries around the world) in his state. In Oregon where I live, Governor Kate Brown authorized $35 million last year to improve CTE programs. These are just two examples of how policymakers, at the urging of business and industry, are turning to CTE to fill the skills gap and improve our economy.

South Korea once had a strong vocational education system—so powerful it rebuilt its shattered economy. But today that is no longer the case. As we work to improve our CTE system in the United States, it behooves us to look at why VET lost favor in South Korea and examine the innovative solutions that are being implemented to improve education, training, and career options there.

From High Demand to Low Demand
After the Korean War, the economy of the newly divided Korean peninsula was devastated. However, you would never know it when you look at South Korea today. Gleaming skyscrapers dominate the Seoul skyline, internationally famous songs invoke the high life, and high-tech industry proliferates throughout the country.

It was no easy path to get this far in such a short period of time. It took comprehensive reforms that were anchored in education, and more specifically, vocational education and training.

In the 1970s and 1980s, vocational education in South Korea was more than socially acceptable, it was the primary way to succeed in obtaining a steady job with a decent income. Forty-five percent of students were enrolled in VET programs* compared to 11.4 percent in universities. With the shift to a more knowledge-based rather than industrial economy (known as the “tiger years”), the university degree grew in prominence to employers and, therefore, parents.

Current Situation
Today, the perception of VET has quickly fallen, and in 2013, only 18 percent of students were enrolled in VET programs.* Part of this is due to the prestige of university—affluent families can afford the tutoring that is now required for students to pass the entrance exam and be able to attend college. Students from families who cannot afford these tutors simply have fewer options in higher education.

Read the full article on Education Week’s Global Learning blog. 

 

Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Associate 

By Katie Fitzgerald in Uncategorized
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$75 Million Investment Puts CTE on a National Stage

Thursday, January 21st, 2016

On Tuesday, JPMorgan Chase announced a $75 million initiative, New Skills for Youth, to support Career Technical Education (CTE) in the United States and abroad including $35 million dedicated to improving state CTE systems through a competition co-led by NASDCTEc and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO). This announcement has made its way through social media channels, on blogs and in national and local publications, placing CTE front and center on the national education stage. We’ve pulled together some of the best Tweets, articles and information from the announcement.

A variety of op-eds were picked up including one by Freeman Hrabowski, President of UMBC, and Jamie Dimon, President and CEO of JPMorgan Chase in USA Today, and Chauncy Lennon, Head of Workforce Initiatives at JPMorgan Chase on U.S. News.

Additionally, Chicago Tribune and Politico highlighted the new initiative, and an article in Education Week focused on the state competition grants. CBS News released a video of Dimon speaking about the benefits of this investment. The Seventy Four reported the $75 million investment pushed education philanthropy to $1.2 billion so far in 2016. To keep up-to-date with New Skills for Youth be sure to check our Newsroom, and learn more about the initiative including the state competitions here.

Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Associate 

By Katie Fitzgerald in Uncategorized
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State Policy Update: It’s that Time Again

Friday, January 15th, 2016

That’s right, it’s time again for state legislatures to begin work on yet another year of lawmaking. It’s also time for our annual publication of “2015 Year in Review: State Policies Impacting CTE,” a joint venture of NASDCTEc and the Association of Career and Technical Education. You can find the report here on January 21.

Have you signed up for our January 21 webinar yet? Join us as we unpack the policy trends from 2015 and take a deep dive on major efforts in Colorado with state Senate Minority Leader Rollie Heath and Dr. Sarah Heath, Assistant Provost for CTE with the Colorado Community College System.

Looking ahead to 2016, several statehouses are already off to a fast start. In fact, 30 legislatures have already begun their work, and as many as 16 governors have already given their annual State of the State or budget addresses. We will continue to provide updates as the remaining governors give their speeches and unveil their budgets. (Note: Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, and Texas do not have legislative sessions this year.)

The governors’ addresses often provide a window into the major issues that will dominate the year’s legislative agenda. Already, it seems to be a mixed bag fiscally with some governors citing the acute budget crunch facing their states. Others are reveling in their surpluses and proposing major increases to core services such as education and health care that were often neglected as the states recovered from the Great Recession.

Here’s a quick roundup of some gubernatorial highlights as they impact CTE:

Other governors (California, Georgia and New York) proposed major K-12 funding increases, but it remains unclear how and if that will impact CTE. Similar, several governors (Georgia, Indiana, and South Dakota) also focused on increasing the salaries for K-12 teachers and other ways to recruit and retain teachers.

Andrea Zimmermann, State Policy Associate

 

By Andrea Zimmermann in Uncategorized
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NASDCTEc Legislative Update: President Obama Delivers Last State of the Union, Groups Call for Perkins Reauthorization

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

United States CapitalLast night President Obama delivered his final State of the Union (SOTU) address to Congress. This particular speech was a bit different in tone and substance than previous addresses the President has annually delivered since 2009. Rather than outlining a policy agenda for the coming year, President Obama largely took a more introspective approach to his last speech to Congress, highlighting many of his policy achievements that have come to define his time in office while identifying some of the key challenges he argued the country must address once he departs from the White House.

This year’s SOTU address was organized around four big questions that related directly to these challenges. The first two of these related to the President’s economic opportunity agenda which he argued will provide “everyone a fair shot at success” primarily through education and training while the next question related to the nation’s ability to harness and leverage the potential of technology.

The President spoke to these questions directly last night highlighting the importance of supporting graduates in fields like engineering and computer science, while mentioning the recent reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) as important achievement of his administration. He also emphasized the importance of students being “job-ready on day one”, as he underlined the progress his administration has made in maximizing the national high school graduation rate.

Significantly, President Obama renewed his call to increase college affordability by making the first two years of a college education tuition-free for eligible students. However, the majority of last night’s SOTU was devoted to other issues that will likely take center stage in the coming presidential election later this year.

350 Businesses, Employer Associations, and Education Groups Call for Perkins Reauthorization

Last Friday a national coalition of stakeholders interested in the reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act (Perkins) sent a letter to Congress calling on lawmakers to reauthorize this important law in final session of the 114th Congress.

The letter garnered 350 signatures of support from groups throughout the country ranging from Fortune 500 companies such as IBM and J.P. Morgan Chase & Co., to other well-known organizations such as the NAACP and the American Federation of Teachers. NASDCTEc was proud to be counted among this large, highly diverse group of co-signers and supports the four broad recommendations outlined in the letter for the law’s renewal:

As we have previously shared, Congress is in the early stages of consideration of the Perkins Act. The House Education committee recently held a Perkins-related hearing in late 2015— right around the same time the Senate Education committee released a set of bipartisan reauthorization principles that have guided efforts to reauthorize the law in that chamber.

The Congressional education committees have continued to prioritize the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act (HEA) in 2016, but a number of extenuating factors related to that effort keep the chances of further Congressional consideration of Perkins this year relatively high.

Be sure to check back here for more updates and analysis as Perkins reauthorization continues to take shape in the months ahead.

Odds & Ends

Steve Voytek, Government Relations Manager

By Steve Voytek in Uncategorized
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This Week in CTE

Friday, January 8th, 2016

TWEET OF THE WEEK

REPORT OF THE WEEK

Using Dual Enrollment to Improve the Educational Outcomes of High School Students
ACT released a report delving into the benefits of providing dual enrollment opportunities for high school students, with a list of recommendations to expand dual enrollment programs including creating funding structures for programming and exploring online technology to increase accessibility. Read More.

WEBINAR OF THE WEEK

Connecting Credentials is hosting a series of webinars focused on improving credentialing, the first of which is today, highlighting employer engagement in credentialing. Learn more about the series here.

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE WEEK

350 employers, industry and education organizations from ACT, Inc. to Xerox signed a letter urging Congress to reauthorize the Carl D. Perkins Career Technical Education Act. Learn More.

Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Associate 

By Katie Fitzgerald in Advance CTE Announcements, Legislation, Meetings and Events, News, Publications, Research, Resources, Webinars
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Preparing Students for Careers in the Global Economy

Wednesday, January 6th, 2016

Today, the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc), Asia Society, Longview Foundation and Association for Career and Technical Educators (ACTE) jointly released a new white paper: Preparing a Globally Competent Workforce Through High-Quality Career Technical Education. This paper explores why it is so critical that global competencies are embedded throughout CTE programs of study to ensure students are fully prepared for the competitive economy, and offers examples of local CTE programs successfully integrating global concepts through partnerships, projects and other student experiences.

Learn more about the paper and this key issue in a blog co-authored by NASDCTEc, Asia Society, Longview Foundation and ACTE at Education Week.

This paper is intended to spark  conversations at the national, state and local levels about ways in which CTE and global competencies can be integrated. To be part of these conversations, please join us for a special #GlobalEdChat on Twitter on Thursday, GlobalPaperJanuary 7 at 8 pm ET as well as an interactive webinar on January 13, 2016 at 3:00 pm ET.

 

By Kate Blosveren Kreamer in Advance CTE Resources, Publications, Resources
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Register Today for NASDCTEc’s Upcoming Webinars

Tuesday, January 5th, 2016

Webinar: 2015 Year in Review: State Policies Impacting CTE

Register today for our newest webinar, where you can learn about state CTE policy trends around the country. Join NASDCTEc and the Association of Career and Technical Education on January 21, from 2-3 p.m. ET, as we unpack the findings of our third annual report, “2015 Year in Review: State Policies Impacting CTE,” which will also be released on January 21. Check out our 2014 and 2013 reports as well.

Speakers:
Senator Rollie Heath, Colorado State Senate District 18
Alisha Hyslop, Director of Public Policy, ACTE
Sarah Heath, Assistant Provost for Career and Technical Education, Colorado Community College System
Andrea Zimmermann, State Policy Associate, NASDCTEc


Webinar: Preparing a Globally Competent Workforce Through High-Quality Career Technical Education

And don’t forget to register for next week’s webinar on global competencies and CTE! On January 13, from 3-4 pm ET, NASDCTEc , the Asia Society, Longview Foundation and ACTE are co-hosting a webinar to release our joint publication, “Preparing a Globally Competent Workforce Through High-Quality Career and Technical Education.” Local leaders will share what globally-minded CTE programs look like at the classroom level.

Speakers:
JoAnne Honeycutt, State CTE Director, North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
Larisa K. Schelkin, CEO, President & Founder, Global STEM Education Center, Inc.
Mark Tronicke, Global Exchange Coordinator, Bergen County Academies, New Jersey
Heather Singmaster, Assistant Director, Asia Society
Jennifer Manise, Executive Director, Longview Foundation
Kate Blosveren, Associate Executive Director, NASDCTEc
Steve DeWitt, Deputy Executive Director, ACTE

By Andrea Zimmermann in Meetings and Events, Publications, Resources, Webinars
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