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Achieving Excellence: Best Practices for CTE Participation in IEP Meetings

Best Practices

Below is an extended session description from presenter Lakshmi Mahadevan, Assistant Professor/Extension Specialist, Career Technical Special Populations Training & Resource Education Center, Department of Family Development and Resource Management, Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service , on her upcoming session at Achieving Excellence in CTE: The National Career Clusters Institute. Sign up for this session and more today!

Research shows that there is an increase in the number of students with disabilities being enrolled into CTE programs of study and that their diagnosis-related needs present unique challenges to CTE instructors. In order to ensure a successful and safe learning environment for all, CTE instructors will need to advocate effectively for both students as well as their curriculum at IEP meetings. This presentation will train CTE instructors to do just that.

With the increasing enrollment of students with disabilities in CTE classes, most CTE educators attending IEP meetings should be able to actively participate in the process such that their students receive Free and Appropriate Public Education. Active CTE instructors’ participation entails asking insightful questions, explaining the rigorous and relevant nature of CTE programs of study, collaborating with key personnel, formulating IEP goals related to CTE courses and providing suggestions for accommodations and modifications. In addition CTE instructors need to understand state and federal laws and their rights as regards their access to the student’s information because they have an “educational need to know”.

Specifically participants attending this session will learn to describe and list the unique features of CTE courses using a

  • Basic Skills Inventory,
  • Program Inventory and
  • Comprehensive Skills Inventory.

These tools are designed to

  • Enable IEP committees to make informed CTE- related initial and continuing placement decisions even during the absence of a CTE representative;
  • Develop ways to improve students’ learning experiences in CTE classrooms and labs and
  • Help CTE Instructors to advocate for their students and the coursework such that the outcomes of the IEP meetings are optimal for all.

Lakshmi Mahadevan, Assistant Professor/Extension Specialist, Career Technical Special Populations Training & Resource Education Center, Department of Family Development and Resource Management, Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service 

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