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Addressing the Engineering Shortage – Top Four Jobs within the Field

Understanding the various pathways and opportunities within a field is crucial when deciding if a career is right for you. Engineering is no exception. With over 20 different majors within the engineering field alone, it is important for students to find their niche early, in order to plan accordingly and ensure future success. According to a report released by the Institute for a Competitive Workforce, the engineering/STEM pathway is one area where there is a need for more students entering the field as well as more qualified teachers and instructors.

A recent article published in The Wall Street Journal, A Career in Engineering, explores the hottest pathways for aspiring engineers – civil, mechanical, environmental and biomedical engineering – and provides guidance for further advancement within these areas. Emphasized within the article is the need for prospective engineers to understand the intersection between science and math, and how these two areas play an integral role in the engineering field.

The article goes on to discuss how, within each pathway, further education and certifications such as engineer-in-training (EIT) and professional engineer (PE) are necessary to take the next step within a career. Because this field continues to change and become more advanced, engineers must not only learn the technical skills, but they must learn how to apply their academic knowledge as well.

Engineering is a growing field within the career technical education community. There are a number of avenues individuals can choose from, and it is imperative for people to conduct their research so they make can make an informed decision. With the increasing need, especially within STEM programs, to prepare students for college and career, knowing and understanding the different aspects of this field can help to increase the number of prospective students and the number of qualified teachers and instructors within the engineering field.

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