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Massachusetts Puts Plan into Action in use of CTE: Learning that works for Massachusetts Logo

Career Technical Education (CTE) is helping our nation address key challenges – from workforce development to student achievement, from economic vitality to global competitiveness. CTE programs in high schools and post-secondary institutions are leading change, transforming expectations and making a difference. When states use the CTE: Learning that works for America® logos customized for their state, They are affirming their commitment to the CTE brand promise and the five vision principles that guide CTE. This blog will share the Massachusetts logo story.

Massachusetts had a thoughtful plan in promoting their state logo. A task force was formed, comprised of administrators and teachers. They held a 2-hour long meeting, discussing the purpose of the logo, why it is important to CTE programs, and ways the logo can be used. They crafted a major marketing plan to share use of the logo throughout the state. The group decided that the purpose of the logo is to use it as a recruitment tool – to tell students that they should feel good about being part of CTE because it is a source of pride and sense of belonging. The task force formed a message that was part of the branding and went out to share.

The task force members went to professional development meetings (such as the Association of Vocational Administrative instructors; MAVA) and disseminated information various ways: clip_image001MABlog

  • They showed the CTE video CTE: Making the Difference
  • At the Connecting for Success conference, they had a breakout session to promote use of the logo.
  • Gave out flyers, providing valuable context (the ‘why’ we want to use the logo)
  • Talked to people to get them excited about using the logo
  • Showed people how to sign on to use the logo – had a booth at the Connecting for Success conference; in the photo at right, task force members Lisa Weinstein(seated in blue) and Marnie Jain (seated in pink) assisted Maura Russell
  • They had a laptop handy and signed up people on the spot online. People who signed up got a button
  • A group email went out announcing posters showing how to use the logo, what it means to the state
  • Email correspondence a great dissemination tool
  • The marketing group really studied the user guide to make sure they were using the logo correctly and were able to share use guidelines with others

How the logos are being used in the state:

  • emails
  • brochures
  • e-billboard

The group shared other example of use:

  • when schools go to offsite construction areas,  the logo could be on the sides of the van, promoting the logo as they drive around town
  • On the state website

The ‘next steps’ plan is to reach out to all districts and ask ‘how do you access the logo?’ and ‘how are you using it’ – the marketing team will provide ways to use the logo creatively. They are also going to promote ‘kid art’ – CTELogoP_MA_RGBart design that incorporates the logo, showing learning in action. Here are two design examples of the logos available.

 

CTELogoV_MA_RGB

 

Special thanks to Lisa Weinstein and Marnie Jain, who contributed the steps they followed in implementing the state-wide dissemination plan.

Learn more about the CTE: Learning that works for America® logos for your state!

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

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