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Posts Tagged ‘career pathways’

Key Stakeholders Convene to Discuss Career Pathways at Pathways to Prosperity Event

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

This week, more than 400 educators, researchers, business leaders, economists, and civic stakeholders convened at Harvard University to consider the possibility of expanding career pathways in school systems across the country.  The catalyst for the conference was the February 2011 report from the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) titled, Pathways to Prosperity: Meeting the Challenge of Preparing Young Americans for the 21st Century.

Many attendees made the case that the United States can no longer ignore the huge mismatch that exists between the skills students learn in school and the needs of the modern workforce. Several speakers noted that the college-for-all movement has led to widespread dropouts within high school and postsecondary education, college graduates lacking the skills required by employers, and a lack of workers with the high-tech skills essential to the economic development of the United States. Instead, evidence was presented that career pathways prepare all students to be career and college ready and can lead students to higher levels of success as adults. Relevant career pathways open up options for students that the traditional high school and college systems cannot or have not provided in the past.

Ronald Ferguson and William Symonds of the HGSE Pathways to Prosperity Project challenged each person in attendance to submit the steps that they or their organizations will take to advance the Pathways to Prosperity concept. During the conference, attendees shared their strategies, commitments, and experiences for expanding the Multiple Pathways approach. Some see the need to prepare career-ready students as an economic issue, some see it as an issue of equity or social justice, and others view it as a national security issue. Regardless of the philosophical orientation, the participants in the many panels agreed that a more relevant, engaging, and pragmatic approach is needed to prepare students for employment and careers.

Given that students are competing globally with graduates from other countries, it was emphasized that students must acquire the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to help innovate and create new technologies and approaches.  Without commitments from business and education to change local, state, and national policies and systems, there is doubt that the full economic potential of our country or wide-spread sustainable wages can be attained in the foreseeable future.

Many presentations supported Career Technical Education (CTE) as an essential foundational element of creating the pathways needed to truly transform education systems. To assist in moving the pathways movement forward, Ferguson announced the creation of the Pathways to Prosperity Network. The network is “a collaboration between the Pathways to Prosperity Project at HGSE, Jobs for the Future (JFF), and six states focused on ensuring that many more young people complete high school, attain a postsecondary credential with currency in the labor market, and launch into a career while leaving open the prospect of further education.”

To read more go to:  http://www.gse.harvard.edu/news-impact/2012/06/pathways-to-prosperity-network-launches/#ixzz2ODUg9vdv

Patrick Ainsworth, Ed.D., NASDCTEc Past President

By Kara in News
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Politico Opinion Article Touts Benefits of CTE, Encourages Perkins Reauthorization

Friday, March 8th, 2013

A recent opinion article in Politico points to a revamped Career Technical Education (CTE) system as one possible solution to some of our nation’s toughest problems including the skills gap and high school dropout epidemic.

In the article, former White House Domestic Policy Council Director Melody Barnes and Civic Enterprises President and CEO John Bridgeland discuss the benefits of high-quality CTE, which they call “enterprising pathways,” such as helping address the nation’s job crisis and making postsecondary education more accessible.

In the article, Barnes and Bridgeland encourage Congress to prioritize the reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act. They call for reforms that strengthen the links between secondary education, postsecondary education and employers, and link student data with employment and earnings data to assess education and workforce training program efficacy.

Read the full piece here.

Across the country, CTE State Directors are working to ensure that all CTE programs provide rigorous education and training that will lead students to future career success. The themes echoed throughout this article are well-aligned to those presented in the CTE State Directors’ vision for CTE developed in 2010. View the NASDCTEc vision document here.

Kara Herbertson, Research and Policy Manager

By Kara in News
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Alliance for Quality Career Pathways Releases New Papers

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

The Alliance for Quality Career Pathways, a state-led initiative organized by the Center for Law and Social Policy, has released two working papers to help identify criteria that define high-quality career pathways and to create shared performance measures.

In the first paper, The Alliance for Quality Career Pathways Approach: Developing Criteria and Metrics for Quality Career Pathways, a conceptual model is provided of career pathway state and local/regional systems and career pathways programs. The paper defines important terms, provides examples, and describes the Alliance’s approach to creating a framework for quality criteria and performance metrics.

The second paper, A Framework for Measuring Career Pathways Innovation, presents a framework for measurement and looks at key considerations when developing career pathway metrics including:

The working papers are part of a greater initiative to  identify benchmarks of high-quality career pathways and the most relevant metrics for measuring their success.

Kara Herbertson, Research and Policy Manager

By Kara in Publications, Resources
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Register NOW for NASDCTEc Webinar on the Career Pathways Effect: Linking Education and Economic Prosperity

Thursday, December 6th, 2012

Be sure to register for The Career Pathways Effect: Linking Education and Economic Prosperity – A Conversation with the Book’s Team Leaders to be broadcast December 13, 2012 3 p.m. – 4 p.m. Eastern.

Jointly published by CORD and the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc), The Career Pathways Effect meets a need for evidence-based support for concepts and principles associated with Career Clusters™, Career Pathways and Programs of Study, and provides more uniform implementation across the nation.

The Team Leaders of the book will discuss:
• Why the book was developed
• How it is organized
• Share how the book will stimulate conversation on topics such as new models, collection of evidence-based data, and how the successes achieved by CTE can improve all of education.

Team Leader Presenters:
Dean Folkers, Deputy Executive Director, NASDCTEc
Kimberly Green, Executive Director, NASDCTEc
Richard Hinckley, President and CEO, CORD
Debra Mills, Vice President, Partnerships, CORD

LINK to register

Click here and purchase the book today

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

Register Now for NASDCTEc Webinar on The Career Pathways Effect: Linking Education and Economic Prosperity

Friday, November 16th, 2012

Register now and join us for a webinar conversation with the book’s team leaders/authors on December 13, 2012 3 p.m. – 4 p.m. Eastern.

Jointly published by CORD and the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc), The Career Pathways Effect meets a need for evidence-based support for concepts and principles associated with Career Clusters™, Career Pathways and Programs of Study, and provides more uniform implementation across the nation.

The team leaders of the book will:

  • Explain why the book was developed
  • Show how it is organized
  • Share how the book will stimulate conversation on topics such as new models, collection of evidence- based data, and how the successes achieved by CTE can improve all of education

Team leader-author presenters:
Dean Folkers, Deputy Executive Director, NASDCTEc
Kimberly Green, Executive Director, NASDCTEc
Richard Hinckley, President and CEO, CORD
Debra Mills, Vice President, Partnerships, CORD

LINK to register

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

New CRS Report Highlights NASDCTEc Work

Tuesday, October 9th, 2012

The Congressional Research Service (CRS), which provides reports and analyses to Members of Congress on a variety of policy issues, recently released a new report on Career Technical Education. The goal of the report, Career and Technical Education: A Primer, is to “support congressional discussion of initiatives designed to rationalize the workforce development system.”

The report provides an overview of CTE, walks through the delivery and structure of CTE at the secondary, postsecondary, and adult learner levels, and raises several issues facing CTE stakeholders. For example, according to the report, there are four concerns that may hinder CTE delivery at the secondary level: (1) what is the goal of CTE – to broaden the students’ education and provide early exposure to several career options or to ensure students are prepared to enter the workforce, (2) the expense of maintaining and updating the instructional resources and equipment, (3) whether CTE adds value to a college preparatory high school curriculum, and (4) that the common core standards do not define career-ready and thus may not provide immediate career preparation.

While explaining the National Career ClustersTM Framework, the report references data from NASDCTEc’s 2011 issue brief, Career Clusters and Programs of Study: State of the States. The data for this issue brief was culled from the 2010 State Profile survey. We administer this survey to our members every other year to collect a wealth of information to be used in updating the State Profiles, and to provide the basis for a number of issue briefs. We are pleased that CRS was able to utilize our data in their report!

In the section “College- and Career-Ready Standards and CTE Standards” the report highlights NASDCTEc and NCTEF’s work around the Common Career Technical Core (CCTC) as one of the two set of standards impacting CTE students. As stated in the CRS report, the CCTC was developed by 42 states, the District of Columbia, Palau, business and industry representatives, educators, and other stakeholders, and it provides standards for each of the 16 Career ClustersTM and their career pathways.

Nancy Conneely, Director of Public Policy

Adult Career Pathways Training and Support Center Provides Online Assistance

Friday, September 28th, 2012

The Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE), Division of Adult Education and Literacy funds initiatives to advance adult education and to improve teacher quality. The Division is responsible for ensuring the continuous improvement of programs enabling adults to acquire the basic skills necessary to function in today’s society so that they can benefit from the completion of secondary school, enhanced family life, attaining citizenship, and participating in job training and retraining programs.

One of these initiatives is the Adult Career Pathways Training and Support Center.
The Adult Career Pathways Training and Support Center (ACP-SC) provides access to resources and professional development opportunities designed to support adult education practitioners interested in developing, designing, and enhancing Adult Career Pathways.

The National Career Clusters™ Framework is comprised of 16 Career Clusters™ and related Career Pathways to help students explore different career options and better prepare for college and career. The Career Clusters™ and related Career Pathways serve as an organizing tool for schools, small learning communities, academies and magnet schools to develop more effective programs of study and curriculum.

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

Wisconsin State Director Dan Clancy Retires

Tuesday, September 18th, 2012

Dan Clancy has retired as State Director, effective September 14, 2012. Clancy’s service follows a 16-year tenure at the Wisconsin Technical College System (WTCS), including the past 8 years as system President. NASDCTEc thanks Clancy for his contributions toward WTCS initiatives that are helping to move Wisconsin forward including work on Wisconsin Career Pathways, and for his leadership as a State Director.

Serving as Interim State Director is Kathleen Cullen, Vice President of Teaching and Learning, also at the Wisconsin Technical College System. NASDCTEc welcomes Kathleen. She can be reached at kathleen.cullen@wtcsystem.edu.

More information:

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

Legislative Update: Appropriations

Friday, June 15th, 2012

Perkins Level Funded in Senate Spending Bill

This week the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education marked up their FY13 appropriation bill, which allocated approximately $158 billion to be divided up among its programs, including the Perkins Act. We are happy to report that Perkins was level funded. Given threats to non-defense discretionary programs from sequestration and other budget proposals, we think that level funding is a victory. Thank you to all of you who made outreach to your Senators! Hearing from constituents really can make a difference.

The full Senate Appropriations Committee passed the Labor-HHS-Education bill yesterday by a party-line vote of 16-14. The bill proposes to change the name of the Office of Vocational and Adult Education to the Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education. In order for this to happen the House would also have to propose such a change in their bill or agree to the change in conference.

During the mark up the full Committee approved an amendment to restore Pell grant eligibility for Ability to Benefit (ATB) students participating in career pathway programs. Pell eligibility for ATB students was eliminated in the FY12 appropriations bill.

Contact Your Representative Today to Maintain Perkins Act Funding!

The House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Subcommittee Chairman Denny Rehberg (MT) previously stated that his subcommittee would not mark up their appropriations bill until after the Supreme Court ruled on the Affordable Care Act. We are now hearing that he plans to mark up their bill on June 20th.

If your Representative is a member of the Appropriations Labor-HHS-Education Subcommittee, we urge you contact them today and ask that they maintain Perkins Act funding. Because the House’s allocation for education and labor programs is lower than that of the Senate, it is even more important that House members hear from constituents about the importance of Perkins and CTE in helping to prepare students for jobs that remain unfilled, and in turning around the economy. There is a greater possibility that Perkins could be cut in this  House bill.

House Appropriations Labor-HHS-Education Subcommittee members:

  • Denny Rehberg, Montana (Chair)
  • Jerry Lewis, California
  • Rodney Alexander, Louisiana
  • Jack Kingston, Georgia
  • Kay Granger, Texas
  • Michael K. Simpson, Idaho
  • Jeff Flake, Arizona
  • Cynthia M. Lummis, Wyoming
  • Rosa L. DeLauro, Connecticut (Ranking Member)
  • Nita M. Lowey, New York
  • Jesse L. Jackson, Jr., Illinois
  • Lucille Roybal-Allard, California
  • Barbara Lee, California

Call Your Member of Congress TODAY!

  •  Call the House switchboard at 202-224-3121, and ask to be connected to your Members’ office.
  • Once connected to the Member’s office, ask to speak to the staffer that works on appropriations or education issues.
  • Tell them that cuts to CTE and Perkins will hurt CTE students in every state. Include concrete examples and data from your Member’s district about how students and programs will be impacted by any cuts to Perkins. Make the case, where appropriate, that cuts will hurt the local economy

If you have any questions or to update NASDCTEc on your contact with Congress, please call Nancy Conneely, Public Policy Manager, at 301-588-9630 or email her at nconneely@careertech.org

Legislative Update: House Committee Passes WIA Reauth Bill

Friday, June 8th, 2012

The House Education and the Workforce Committee held a markup of H.R. 4297, the Workforce Investment Improvement Act of 2012 yesterday. The bill represents large scale changes to the current WIA program. The bill was approved by a party line vote of 23 to 15. There is no word on when the bill will go to the floor.

The bill proposes to consolidate approximately 30 existing workforce and training programs into a single, flexible Workforce Investment Fund, and it would give Governors the power to consolidate even more programs under a unified state plan. The bill would also require states and locals to use common performance measures for all workforce development programs.

As we previously reported, an earlier bill introduced by Rep. Virginia Foxx (NC), which was merged into H.R. 4297, allowed states to submit a unified state plan encompassing two or more job training and related programs, including both Perkins secondary and postsecondary programs. Under Foxx’s bill, Perkins funds would have been eligible to be consolidated into a Workforce Investment Fund and used for workforce activities. After hearing from the CTE community, new language was added to the Workforce Investment Improvement Act that singles out Perkins as one program whose funds cannot be consolidated into the Workforce Investment Fund.

The Workforce Investment Improvement Act also proposes changes to the Job Corps program to ensure that CTE and job training offered under that program is focused on in-demand occupations and that disadvantaged youth receive a regular high school diploma and/or a postsecondary credential that prepares them for employment.

Democrats on the Committee are not supportive of the bill, and offered a substitute bill as an amendment. Their bill focused on career pathways in high demand industries that lead to industry recognized credentials and postsecondary attainment. It would also expand the role of community colleges in job training. The Democrats’ amendment was voted down along party lines.

A summary of H.R. 4297 can be found here.

Nancy Conneely, Public Policy Manager

 

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