Posts Tagged ‘Data Collection’

What the 2020 Decennial Census Means for Education Funding

Thursday, October 25th, 2018

Every 10 years the U.S. Census Bureau collects data from the residents of the United States through the national census. The census is pivotal to understanding the composition of the country, but it also plays a large role in federal funding levels of major programs. In fact, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that education programs are some of the biggest to use census data to determine funding. For example, the Pell Grant program utilizes census data and was allotted $29.8 billion dollars in 2015.

Additionally, the annual American Community Survey (ACS) relies on census data and plays a significant role in distributing funding to education programs. Census data, and correlated data from the ACS, decide how much funding should be allocated to different areas of education research, as well as how much money is needed for a variety of education programs. It is estimated that at least $47 billion in federal education funding is affected by census and ACS results.

According to the Leadership Conference Education Fund, Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality and Economic Security and Opportunity Initiative, data from the census and ACS impacts education research and programs in ways such as:

Because the census is the only nation-wide survey that attempts to collect comprehensive data on each resident, preparation for the 2020 Census has been focused on how to reach every individual and increase response rates. For the first time, the 2020 Census will have the option to fill out and submit entirely online. In addition, the Integrated Partnership and Communications division pays special attention to populations that are typically under-represented in the census.

Meredith Hills, Policy Associate

By Meredith Hills in Uncategorized
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Latest Advance CTE Brief Explores State Strategies for Measuring Work-based Learning

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

Measuring WBLWork-based learning provides a continuum of activities — from career exploration and job shadowing to internships and apprenticeships — that help students develop technical and professional skills in an authentic work environment. While many work-based learning programs are designed and operated at the local level, several states have begun building a data collection and evaluation strategy to ensure program quality, identify and scale successful programs, and share promising practices. To support state efforts in this work, Advance CTE today released a brief that explores strategies for measuring work-based learning.

The brief is the latest installment in the “Connecting the Classroom to Careers” series, which examines the state’s role in expanding work-based learning opportunities for K-12 students. This issue highlights examples from three states that demonstrate either a systems-level or student-level approach to measuring work-based learning activities.

The brief, Measuring Work-based Learning for Continuous Improvement, is available on the Learning that Works Resource Center. Other titles in the series explore Setting a Statewide Vision, Removing Legal Barriers, and Leveraging Intermediaries to Expand Work-based Learning.

To learn more about work-based learning, be sure to sign up for Advance CTE’s fall meeting, which will take place in Baltimore, MD between October 17 and 19. The convening will feature a session on state strategies for measuring and scaling work-based learning. Register by August 31 to receive the early bird discount.

Austin Estes, Policy Associate

By Austin Estes in Public Policy, Publications, Research
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