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Posts Tagged ‘Kentucky’

Catching Up With … State Legislatures (Part 3)

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

Editor’s Note: This is part of a series that will highlight some of this year’s major state legislative Catching Up Seriesactivity as it relates to Career Technical Education (CTE). Further explanation of the series can be found here and the previous installments here and here. For a comprehensive look-back at the 2013 legislative sessions, check out the “2013 CTE Year in Review,” which was published jointly by NASDCTEc and the Association for Career and Technical Education in March.

Workforce development received a lot of attention from state legislatures this spring as lawmakers across the country created new apprenticeship programs, and called on state workforce boards, businesses and education entities to collaborate in order better address local labor market needs and skills gaps.

Apprenticeships, Career Pathways and Tax Credits

Several states created or expanded their apprenticeship programs in an effort to create a stronger pipeline of skilled talent in specific fields. Both Indiana and Connecticut seized on tax credits as a means to encourage businesses to offer qualified apprenticeships.

In Indiana, school districts and charter schools can now receive grants to support career pathways for high-wage, high-demand jobs that require an industry-recognized credential and includes a cooperative agreement with a business. Also, an employer that hires a student who has completed such program is eligible for a tax credit. Indiana also set aside an additional $5 million for its Pathways for Academic Career and Employment, a program first started in 2013 to provide partnerships between community colleges, industry and nonprofits.

Iowa Governor Terry Branstad’s proposed apprenticeship program also passed the legislature, committing about $6 million for the Apprenticeship Training Program Fund and a job training program.

Sector Partnerships, Alignment and Coordination

Several state legislatures directed their workforce investment boards and other entities to determine local and regional workforce needs and to better align their work with counterparts in education and commerce.

In Alabama, the state’s workforce board was allocated $4.3 million for regions to determine local skill needs, develop seamless educational pathways and align funding with identified local workforce needs. The law also sets aside $600,000 for career coaches and an additional $200,000 for regional leadership planning efforts. In a separate bill, the state also created a workforce council to promote industry-focused coordination between businesses and its P-12 and higher education systems.

Kentucky lawmakers required the state’s Office of Education and Workforce Statistics to gather and disseminate employment and earnings data of public, postsecondary graduates. Meanwhile Oregonian lawmakers passed a bill to define “a robust and effective workforce system” by promoting coordination and collaboration of the state’s employment, economic development, job training services and education sectors – in particular community colleges and public and private universities.

Connecticut’s manufacturing industry received a boost from the state legislature through the new Manufacturing Innovation Fund, which can be used to support public and private education and training programs.

States also called upon their workforce boards, education systems and businesses to create sector partnerships in order to better provide industry-driven career pathways and address local and regional skills gaps.

Andrea Zimmermann, State Policy Associate

By Andrea Zimmermann in Legislation, Public Policy
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CTE Month Special: What Do the State of the States Mean for CTE?

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014

Over the last month, governors around the country have gone before their state legislatures and constituents to deliver a state of the state address. A great number of this year’s state of the state addresses included proposals to expand CTE, career-readiness and expanded choices in postsecondary education. Below is the first installment of our special CTE Month roundup of state of the states as they impact CTE.

In Alabama Governor Robert Bentley announced his support for the plans laid by the Governor’s Career Ready Task Force, emphasizing the need for business and industry leaders to contribute to the conversation about what constitutes career-readiness. He advocated expanding Alabama’s dual enrollment programs and providing for more career coaches.

Governor Sean Parnell of Alaska also endorsed CTE, including proposals to expand dual enrollment programs and more CTE pathways. He commended CTE as a strategy to raise graduation rates, noting that in the Northwest Arctic Borough, introducing CTE programs led to an 11 percent increase in graduation rates.

Delaware Governor Jack Markell proposed an expansive strategy to expand CTE, beginning with a two-year comprehensive manufacturing CTE program for juniors and seniors that focuses on engineering and would lead to nationally recognized manufacturing certificates. Linked to that program, he also announced his desire to promote public-private partnerships to offer students real-world experience as part of a career-ready curriculum, and partnerships between schools and private industry to identify the programs that will best serve graduates as they enter the workforce. He touted Delaware’s JobLink program, a database designed to help employers search for jobseekers by their skills. Like Governors Bentley and Parnell, Markell also pushed for expanded dual-enrollment programs for secondary students, enabling them to earn post-secondary credit over the course of their studies.

Neil Abercrombie, Governor of Hawaii, touted his state’s investment in STEM initiatives, singling out the Thirty Meter Telescope, which features a STEM training partnership with the Institute for Astronomy’s Akamai Workforce Initiative to train postsecondary students in STEM and robotics.

Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear lauded the state’s progress in CTE. He cited “…a new model of secondary career and technical education to make it more accessible to students at an earlier age, more rigorous academically and better aligned with both postsecondary requirements and employer needs…We are fitting the pieces together to create a seamless, cradle-to-career education system that is better preparing our students for this complex world.”

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory outlined the importance of ensuring that secondary and postsecondary pathways for success include all types of postsecondary credential—certificates, associates degrees and professional certification—as well as four-year degrees. Governor McRory also conveyed his support for helping private sector professionals transition into teaching, opening the door for experts in technical fields to begin careers as CTE teachers.

In his State of the State Address, Governor Earl Ray Tomblin of West Virginia expressed his belief that CTE can be a critical tool for students who wish to pursue STEM at the postsecondary level. He cited West Virginia’s work to bring math and language arts teachers into career and technical schools, thereby minimizing the need to bus students to and from CTE and comprehensive schools. Governor Tomblin also highlighted the Advanced Careers Program (ACP), pointing out five CTE sites that have instituted career courses as a result of the ACP program, and stated that the program would help 32 sites to implement high quality CTE programs by 2016.

These governors proposed action to unlock CTE’s potential to help students, improve workforce quality and boost economic development. Be sure to visit the links above for the full text of each governor’s address. Don’t see your state? Keep an eye on the CTE Blog for part two of our state of the states roundup!

- Evan Williamson, Communications Associate

By Evan Williamson in CTE: Learning that works for America, Legislation, News
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CTE in the News: KY Gov. Streamlines CTE to Boost Efficiency

Friday, August 31st, 2012

Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear signed an executive order this week that would streamline all Career Technical Education (CTE) programs under the Kentucky Department of Education. The move was intended to organize the education system, encourage consistency and address the needs of employers quickly, according to a Lexington Herald-Leader article.

Prior to the executive order, high schools operated CTE programs using local and state funds and reported to the Kentucky Department of Education. However, the state also had 53 technical centers for 123 school districts that reported to the Department for Workforce Investment, according to the article.

Dale Winkler, Executive Director of the Office of Career and Technical Education, said the change will help streamline the programs, which had different curricula and more efficiently work with employers who provide support.

“Industry has really been behind this,” said Winkler, in the article. “Before, they had to go and address two different audiences if they needed to make changes.”

Also, under the order, a committee of educators, employers and other experts will be selected to advise on the program curriculum and career pathways. About 75 percent of Kentucky high school students received some form of technical career education last year.

Erin Uy, Communications & Marketing Manager

By Erin in News
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KY Governor Announces Dual and Concurrent Enrollment Initiative

Thursday, October 13th, 2011

Jobs that provide family-sustaining wages increasingly require postsecondary credentials and certificates, and one governor is determined to better equip secondary students with college credits and certificates to ease the transition to postsecondary education or the workforce.

Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear announced this month an initiative to provide dual and concurrent enrollment for secondary students in the state. “This agreement moves Kentucky closer to a seamless education system that prepares every graduate for a successful career,” said Governor Beshear. “It helps us motivate students to stay in school by increasing the relevance of their coursework, which allows them a direct path to a broad range of opportunities.”

The initiative, a partnership between several education and workforce offices in Kentucky, allows high school students to simultaneously earn high school and college credits for approved academic and Career Technical Education (CTE) courses. For the 70 percent of secondary students in Kentucky enrolled in CTE courses, the addition of dual and concurrent enrollment programs will likely spur more students to attain postsecondary degrees and credentials.

President of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System, Michael McCall, stated that “Providing students with the ability to earn college credits in high school is just one way we are providing real career opportunities to Kentuckians and transforming the state’s economy.”

Learn more about dual enrollment and CTE here.

Kara Herbertson, Education Policy Analyst

By Kara in News
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