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Posts Tagged ‘pathways’

CTE in the News: Wisconsin Program Preps Students for College and Career

Friday, August 24th, 2012

All students should be prepared for college and career, say Wisconsin educators who are leading a program to help improve students’ graduation rates, transition services, and post-school outcomes, according to a recent Education Daily article.

The Wisconsin Career Pathways program was designed to serve all students. Starting in ninth grade, students are asked to choose a career to study and take classes in their chosen field.  The Wisconsin Technical College System partnered with the state department of instruction to develop the program, which is web-based and modeled after the National Career Clusters ™ Framework.

“The idea is that students are making their own plan to prepare for the future,” said Marge Rubin, director of College and Career Pathways at Fox Valley Technical College in Appleton, Wis.

“Research shows that students who have plans are more successful than those who don’t.”

The program intends for students to explore different jobs within the career of their choice so they understand the academic and technical requirements, demands and outlook for those jobs, and what postsecondary options within the state can help them achieve their college and career goals.

“There was this great divide. Students either had to choose between preparing for college or a career,” Rubin said. “All students need to be prepared for both.”

Education Daily is an online publication available only to its subscribers.

Erin Uy, Communications & Marketing Manager

By Erin in News
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Gallup and Harvard Education Leaders Join CTE Foundation Board of Directors

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

Tim Hodges, Director of Research for Gallup’s Education Practice, and William (Bill) Symonds, Director of the Harvard Graduate School of Education Pathways to Prosperity Project, have joined the Board of Directors of the National Career Technical Education Foundation (NCTEF). Hodges and Symonds bring to NCTEF their reputable experience in and longstanding commitment to quality education.

Dean Folkers, NCTEF Deputy Executive Director, calls Hodges and Symons “visionary leaders who are committed to charting a new path for education in America” who will help NCTEF’s work in supporting and pursuing high-quality CTE.

Under NASDCTEc, NCTEF develops and funds activities and programs that are designed to improve CTE.  NCTEF has focused significant efforts in support of Career Clusters ™ projects and efforts to increase the visibility and advance quality of CTE. As public members of the Board of Directors these leaders will advise and influence the policy and direction of the work NCTEF supports in CTE and Career Clusters™

Hodges consults with K-12 school districts and higher education institutions to lead research projects in strengths development, employee selection and engagement, and wellbeing.   Hodges experienced formal CTE through marketing and agricultural programs, and served in leadership roles for Career Technical Student Organizations as well.

Symonds is the primary author of a groundbreaking report – Pathways to Prosperity: Meeting the Challenge of Preparing Young Americans for the 21st Century – which was released in February 2011.  Since, he has been invited to speak about the report in more than half the 50 states. The report analyzes the reasons America has failed to prepare so many of its youth to lead successful lives as adults, and notably suggests supporting high-quality, comprehensive pathways, such as those used in CTE, that will lead students to a certificate or a postsecondary credential.

Erin Uy, Communications & Marketing Manager

By Erin in NASDCTEc Announcements
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Most Manufacturing Executives Report a Shortage of Qualified Workers, Survey Shows

Thursday, November 3rd, 2011

A recent national survey from the Manufacturing Institute, an organization focused on improving and expanding manufacturing in the United States, delves deeper into the “skills gap” issue and examines how industry leaders are responding to this challenge.

Of the thousand manufacturing executives who completed the Manufacturing Institute’s survey, nearly 70 percent reported that they have a moderate or severe shortage of available, highly-qualified workers. Over half expect the shortage to worsen within the next five years. Further, over 60 percent of executives stated that shortages and skill deficiencies are having a profound impact on their companies’ ability to expand and improve.

Manufacturing Institute President Emily DeRocco stated that students and their parents have a limited understanding of the jobs that are available in manufacturing today, partly due to the stigma around the low-skilled manufacturing jobs of the last century. However, today’s manufacturing jobs require more complex skills, like high-level technology and computer skills, and are situated in much better work environments.

Many executives reported that available jobs are in areas of “skilled production,” such as machinists, operators, distributors, and technicians. DeRocco suggests that companies partner with educational institutions, such as CTE schools and centers, to further align education and training to meet the needs of business and industry.

Through the Manufacturing Career Cluster, Career Technical Education (CTE) programs provide a response to manufacturers’ demands by educating students through career pathways that lead to industry-recognized credentials. Still, more students are needed to overcome this skills gap by training in advanced manufacturing programs of study (POS) and acquiring the skills needed to pursue positions in manufacturing.

The Manufacturing Institute and Deloitte provide an analysis of the survey results in Boiling Point? The Skills Gap in U.S. Manufacturing.

Kara Herbertson, Education Policy Analyst

 

By Kara in News, Publications, Research
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