Posts Tagged ‘PAYA’

Incorporating Youth Apprenticeships in Career Technical Education Pathways

Wednesday, December 19th, 2018

This blog was originally published as part of the Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeship Blog Series

By integrating classroom instruction and hands-on learning, both youth apprenticeships and Career Technical Education (CTE) can enhance a learner’s educational experience and better prepare them for future career success. Putting Learner Success First: A Shared Vision for the Future of CTE underscores the significance of coordinating high-quality youth apprenticeships and CTE, empowering learners through work-based learning and strong systems alignment anchored in learner success. Rather than isolating CTE as a separate educational strategy, an integrated approach to education and training can ensure that all learners have opportunities to succeed in a career of their choosing.

Advance CTE recently expanded our commitment to youth apprenticeship programs by joining the Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeship Initiative (PAYA). CTE can and should have a clear role in helping to achieve all five of the PAYA principles for high quality youth apprenticeships. In particular, the “Career-Oriented” PAYA principle that “learning is structured around knowledge, skills, and competencies that lead to careers with family-supporting wages” is supported by bringing together apprenticeship and CTE programs.

High-quality youth apprenticeships share the same core elements as CTE programs of study. For example, Advance CTE’s Policy Benchmark Tool identifies rigorous course standards and progressive, sequenced courses; secondary and postsecondary alignment and early postsecondary offerings; industry involvement; labor market demand; and high-quality instruction and experiential learning as necessary for a program to be considered high quality – all of which are reflected across the PAYA principles.

What This Looks Like in Practice

The Tech Ready Apprentices for Careers in Kentucky (TRACK) program showcases the opportunities that become available to students when instructional alignment and programmatic articulation are coordinated between CTE and youth apprenticeships. TRACK is a statewide program, overseen by the Kentucky Labor Cabinet and Department of Education’s Office of Career and Technical Education, that supports secondary students participating in registered youth apprenticeships. Employers and educators work together through TRACK to create youth pre-apprenticeships that match registered apprenticeships, as well as select a four-course CTE sequence and a coordinated industry certification.

TRACK first launched with a manufacturing pilot in thirteen high schools during the 2013 – 2014 school year. Since then the program has been scaled to include other schools and additional skilled trades. The program utilizes Kentucky’s existing CTE infrastructure to create a pipeline for students that begins in high school and culminates in an industry-recognized credential, paid work experience and, in many cases, advanced standing within a full Registered Apprenticeship.

Another example is the Apprenticeship Maryland Program (AMP), created as a new CTE program of study through a partnership with the Maryland State Department of Education and Department of Labor and Licensing Regulation. AMP students are able to participate in paid work based learning, enroll in applicable academic courses and spend time with a mentor from a relevant industry. One of the intentions of AMP is for students to understand the direct connection between their educational experience and the state’s workforce demands. Participants benefit from the chance to “earn and learn” with local businesses, while also getting credit toward high school graduation and earning a credential- underscoring the importance of combining academics and workforce skills.

Over the past two years, AMP was rolled out on a trial basis in two county public school systems. These pilot programs were so successful that AMP is now scaled in additional districts across the state. To create strong AMP sites, the state works with local businesses in addition to the local school system in order to provide students with a directly applicable learning experience.

For more examples of best practices, as well as common challenges, in linking CTE and apprenticeships, check out a report from Advance CTE in partnership with JFF, Vivayic and RTI International on Opportunities for Connecting Secondary CTE Students and Apprenticeships. This report was developed through a contract with the Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education, at the U.S. Department of Education.

Meredith Hills, Policy Associate

By Meredith Hills in Uncategorized
Tags: , ,

Advance CTE Celebrates National Apprenticeship Week

Thursday, November 15th, 2018

Across the country there is renewed interest in growing apprenticeship programs for youth and adult learners. By integrating classroom instruction and hands-on learning, apprenticeships can serve as a meaningful part of a Career Technical Education (CTE) program of study,  enhance the educational experience and better prepare learners for future career success. In June 2017, Advance CTE, in partnership with JFF, Vivayic and RTI International was contracted by the U.S. Department of Education to explore ways in which secondary CTE students could be better connected to apprenticeship programs. As a result, Advance CTE published  a report that profiled eight secondary apprenticeship programs to identify strategies to connect CTE with apprenticeship programs. The report highlights major takeaways as well as recommendations for program design, effectiveness, student-parent engagement and communications, financing, equity and access.

Last month, we expanded our commitment to youth apprenticeship programs by joining the Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeship Initiative (PAYA), along with CareerWise Colorado, Charleston Regional Youth Apprenticeships, Education Strategy Group, JFF, the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity, the National Fund for Workforce Solutions, the National Governors Association and New America. Over the next four years, PAYA will support efforts in states and cities to expand access to high-quality apprenticeship opportunities for high school age youth. PAYA will convene experts and partners, support a community of practitioners, publish research and provide grants and direct assistance to promising youth apprenticeship programs in cities and states across the U.S. We join our PAYA partners in thanking the funders of this initiative – Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Ballmer Group, Bloomberg Philanthropies, the Joyce Foundation, JP Morgan Chase & Co. and the Siemens Foundation.

Earlier this week the Apprenticeship Forward Collaborative released their Definitions and Principles for Expanding Quality Apprenticeships in the U.S. that Advance CTE signed on to and supports. These guiding principles for quality apprenticeships include:

  1. Strong business demand for apprentices;
  2. Advancement of the livelihood of U.S. workers;
  3. Partnerships between local businesses, the workforce and education systems, human services organizations, labor and labor-management partnerships and other community-based organizations;
  4. Accessibility for new and incumbent workers that supports the success of a diverse pipeline of apprentices;
  5. Alignment with K-12 and postsecondary educational opportunities to support lifelong learning and skill attainment;
  6. Robust data systems to continuously improve outcomes for business and workers; and
  7. Building on innovative state and local practice.

At a roundtable discussion hosted by the Apprenticeship Forward Collaborative, Advance CTE’s Deputy Executive Director Kate Blosveren Kreamer emphasized that our economy supports the continued skill attainment that apprenticeships provide.

We are excited to continue learning about – and advocating for -impactful apprenticeship opportunities!

Meredith Hills, Policy Associate

By Meredith Hills in Uncategorized
Tags: ,

Advance CTE Joins the Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeship Initiative

Monday, October 29th, 2018

High schools are struggling to prepare young people for today’s economy. Too many students are disengaged and have difficulty navigating their options after graduation. And, many students lack affordable postsecondary opportunities, while a postsecondary education is more important than ever. These challenges make the path to economic security difficult, especially for those facing the persistent racial, gender, and other inequities present in the country today.

At the same time, to compete and grow, employers need to build a sustainable pipeline of workers with adaptable skills. Career Technical Education (CTE) is central to ensuring we align students’ talents and interests with the needs of our economy and employers, and, in recent years, a number of states and communities have developed new youth apprenticeship programs to further expand access to high-quality, career-focused pathways for more learners.

Youth apprenticeship – when designed with quality and equity in mind – allow students to complete high school, start their postsecondary education at no cost, get paid work experience alongside a mentor, and start on a path that broadens their options for the future. However, the policy and practice of youth apprenticeship is still relatively nascent in the United States, necessitating supports and resources for the field.  This is why New America launched the Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeships – or PAYA – a national effort, of which Advance CTE is thrilled to be a part.

The partners of PAYA – Advance CTE, CareerWise Colorado, Charleston Regional Youth Apprenticeships, Education Strategy Group, JFF, the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity, the National Fund for Workforce Solutions, the National Governors Association and New America – will be working together over the next two years to explore the ways youth apprenticeship can be reinvented to better meet the needs of learners and employers.

“We are excited to work on an initiative that will help ensure that each learner has access to a high-quality education and meaningful work-based experiences that provides the skills he or she needs to be successful in a high-wage, in-demand career,” said Kimberly Green, Executive Director of Advance CTE. “PAYA represents a unique blend of policy, practice and research cutting across the national, state and local levels and has the potential for an incredible impact across our country.”

Over the next four years, PAYA will support efforts in states and cities to expand access to high-quality apprenticeship opportunities for high school age youth. PAYA will convene experts and partners, support a community of practitioners, publish research, and provide grants and direct assistance to promising youth apprenticeship programs in cities and states across the U.S.

Advance CTE joins our partners in thanking the funders of this initiative – Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Ballmer Group, Bloomberg Philanthropies, the Joyce Foundation, JP Morgan Chase & Co., and the Siemens Foundation.

To learn more about PAYA and how youth apprenticeship can unlock opportunity for both young people and employers, visit newamerica.org/paya and stay connected to the initiative’s progress following the #PAYA hashtag.

Kate Kreamer, Deputy Executive Director
Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Manager 

By Katie Fitzgerald in Advance CTE Announcements
Tags:

 

Series

Archives

1