BROUGHT TO YOU BY
National Association of State Directors of Career
Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc)

Posts Tagged ‘programs of study’

The Common Career Technical Core, Programs of Study & Industry-Based Standards

Wednesday, July 30th, 2014

Yesterday, NASDCTEc released a new paper – The Common Career Technical Core, Programs of Study & Industry-Based Standards - during a webinar. Leveraging the methodology used to compare over 45 states’ CTE standards to the Common Career Technical Core (CCTC) last year for The State of Career Technical Education: An Analysis of State CTE Standards, this new paper examines how a set of 18 industry-based standards match up to the CCTC, with deep implications for state and local development of standards-based programs of study.

Critically, as we state in the paper, “The intent of this analysis is not to judge any industry-based standards…rather the intent is provide actionable information to state and local CTE leaders as think through how they use industry-based standards within the context of a program of study.”

What Did We Find?

For one, the industry-based standards, on average, were not particularly well aligned with the CCTC. However, this was largely as expected based on scope and design of the CCTC compared to most industry-based standards. The CCTC are benchmark standards that identify what a student should know and be able to do after completing a program of study. As “benchmark standards,” the CCTC are intentionally broad; as “end of program of study standards,” the CCTC cover the full range of knowledge and skills to be imparted over a sequence of courses, from the broadest career exploration to the more occupationally-specific skills. Alternatively, most industry-based standards focus squarely on those occupationally-specific skills, leading to a disconnect between them and the CCTC.

We also found that the majority of industry-based standards did not, on average, address the 12 Career Ready Practices, which are the cross-cutting skills and dispositions necessary for any individual in the workplace. Perhaps the most surprising finding was that less than half of the industry-based standards fully aligned to such Practices as “communicate clearly, effectively and with reason” and “work productively in teams while using cultural/global competence,” which are so highly demanded in today’s economy.

However, the analysis showed that many of the industry-based standards reviewed did align well with the Career Pathway-level standards, which are the most specific standards within the CCTC. Additionally, industry-based standards developed by consortia, such as the National Council for Agriculture Education and the Manufacturing Skill Standards Council, were much  more likely to address both the Career Cluster and Career Pathway-level standards.

What Are the Implications?

The bottom line is that industry-based standards play an important role in preparing students for careers, but that they cannot alone make up a program of study as they often fail to address the broader career exploration skills, as well as those key cross-cutting or “employability” skills that have utility in any career. As state leaders and other stakeholders develop, review and/or approve programs of study, they must:

Read the full report here, watch the webinar recording or download the webinar PPT.

Kate Blosveren, Associate Executive Director, NASDCTEc

By Kate Blosveren in Common Career Technical Core, NASDCTEc Resources, Publications, Research, Webinars
Tags: , ,

CTE Research Review

Wednesday, May 21st, 2014

CTE programs of study (POS) took center stage in a recent study from the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education (NRCCTE), which released its final 200-page report gauging the effectiveness of POS as a strategy for improving student outcomes.

The NRCCTE researchers conducted a longitudinal study of 6,638 students from the class of 2012 participating in POS in three urban districts from different states. The resulting findings offer myriad ways to examine the impact of POS on student success as well as suggestions for future research, in particular on the postsecondary side of POS.

Commonalities existed across all three districts. No matter the location, the findings indicated that taking more CTE credits “may boost GPA, the probability of graduation, and some achievement measures,” and came at little to no cost to overall academic achievement. The study, however, did find low participation in programs associated with accruing college credits while in high school such as dual enrollment.

The study was conducted ahead of the coming reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006, which funds CTE nationwide. The last reauthorization included a new requirement for POS, using the POS framework to increase program accountability in the areas of academic and technical skills achievement as well as alignment with postsecondary technical education.

The NRCCTE researchers found that “although high-quality CTE programs in the form of POS are not easy, cheap, or capable of solving all educational problems, they can be implemented well and yield positive results.”

The researchers conclude with a series of recommendations including calling for districts to find ways to increase the number of CTE credits a high school student can earn, taking another look at dual enrollment programs to maximize student participation, and recruiting more teachers from industry and business.

Andrea Zimmermann, State Policy Associate

By Andrea Zimmermann in Public Policy, Research
Tags:

Announcing Excellence in Action Award – Now Accepting Applications

Friday, January 17th, 2014

CTE_Logo_RGBThe National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc) is pleased to announce our first annual Excellence in Action award, which will recognize and honor superior Career Technical Education (CTE) programs of study from around the nation.  Selected programs of study will exemplify excellence in the implementation of the Career Clusters, and have a meaningful impact on student achievement and success. All winners will be honored at the Achieving Excellence in Career Technical Education: National Career Clusters Institute in Phoenix, Arizona on June 16, 2014.
This award is a terrific opportunity for CTE educators at all levels with truly excellent programs of study to be recognized on a national stage. Winning programs will be selected by a panel of State CTE Directors.

All winners will receive:
• The opportunity to share their programs of study with other CTE educators at the 2014 Achieving Excellence in Career Technical Education: National Career Clusters Institute.
• Two free registrations to the Achieving Excellence Institute.
• A banner to hang in their school or institution of higher education.
• A digital banner to use in email and print materials as they so choose.
Winners will also be featured:
• In a national press release, which will be distributed to national media.
• In a one-pager, used as part of NASDCTEc’s federal advocacy toolkit.
• In a monthly newsletter sent to members of Congress.
• In a stand-alone blog on Learning that Works blog.

How to apply: You can complete the application online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ExcellenceActionAward or email a hard copy version to [email protected] with the subject line: Excellence in Action Award

Application deadline: All applications are due by 5 p.m. ET on Tuesday February 4.

Print

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

By Ramona in National Career Clusters Institute
Tags:

CTE Research Review: OECD Report Examines Postsecondary CTE in the U.S.

Thursday, August 8th, 2013

Research Image_6.2013A new report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) examines strengths and challenges for postsecondary Career Technical Education (CTE) in the U.S.  The authors identified positive aspects including strong labor market returns on associate degrees and certificates, and the inclusiveness of U.S. postsecondary CTE. Broad recommendations were provided in three key areas – funding for quality, aligning credentials to industry needs, and strengthening transitions into and within postsecondary education and the labor market – and more specific recommendations included:

The U.S. Department of Education also released a background piece on postsecondary CTE that was used to inform the study.

NASDCTEc and the College Board recently partnered on a webinar and issue brief to show the relevance of Advanced Placement® (AP) courses and exams to CTE Programs of Study. The issue brief includes information on each Career Cluster® and potential AP courses and exams that could apply to each area. Students, parents, counselors and teachers may find this document especially useful to help CTE students follow programs of study that lead to college and career readiness and success.

Kara Herbertson, Research and Policy Manager

By Kara in News, Research, Resources
Tags: ,

Resources Now Available for NASDCTEc Webinar on Career Clusters™ Crosswalks and the Crosswalk Validation Project

Thursday, November 1st, 2012

This webinar discussed the Crosswalk Validation Project and provided an understanding of why it is necessary use a validated crosswalk when trying to develop and implement programs of study (POS), career pathways, or, more, generally career preparation areas. In addition, discussion about the crosswalk uses for state education agencies (SEAs) and local education agencies (LEAs) in building linkages for career guidance and a discussion about the necessity for SEAs and LEAs to use a validated resource for reporting Perkins accountability requirements were featured.

The Crosswalk Validation Project was a two-year long project led jointly by the National Association of State Directors of Career and Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc) and the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education (NRCCTE). The Crosswalk Validation Project focuses on updating and refining the original national crosswalk (known as Table 7 on www.careertech.org) used by SEAs and LEAs for career guidance as well as Perkins accountability.

View the Webinar Recording
View the Power Point 1.05MB

Presenters included Pradeep Kotamraju, Deputy Director, National Research Center for Career and Technical Education (NRCCTE), Louisville, KY; Bruce Steuernagel, Consultant, National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc) and National Research Center for Career and Technical Education (NRCCTE), Burnsville, MN; and Dean Folkers, Deputy Executive Director, National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc).

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

By Ramona in Webinars
Tags: ,

NASDCTEc Webinar Registration Reminder for Career Clusters™ Crosswalks and the Crosswalk Validation Project

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

This is a reminder to register now for the Career Clusters™ Crosswalks and the Crosswalk Validation Project upcoming webinar on October 25.

This webinar will discuss the Crosswalk Validation Project and provide an understanding of why it is necessary use a validated crosswalk when trying to develop and implement programs of study (POS), career pathways, or, more, generally career preparation areas. In addition, discussion about the crosswalk uses for state education agencies (SEAs) and local education agencies (LEAs) in building linkages for career guidance and a discussion about the necessity for SEAs and LEAs to use a validated resource for reporting Perkins accountability requirements.

The Crosswalk Validation Project was a two-year long project led jointly by the National Association of State Directors of Career and Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc) and the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education (NRCCTE). The Crosswalk Validation Project focuses on updating and refining the original national crosswalk (known as Table 7 on www.careertech.org) used by SEAs and LEAs for career guidance as well as Perkins accountability.

When: October 25, 2012; 3-4 EDT
Link to Register

Presenters:

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

By Ramona in Webinars
Tags: , ,

New York’s P-Tech Program Leads Students to Success

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

In New York, the Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-Tech) is a new style of Career Technical Education (CTE) school that weaves high school and college curriculums into a six-year program tailored for a job in the technology industry.

Students are following a course of studies developed in consultation with IBM, and are expected to emerge with associate’s degrees in applied science in computer information systems or electromechanical engineering technology. The first group of students is slated to complete coursework by 2017.

Other school systems around the country are encouraged by this approach. The Chicago area opened five similar schools this year with corporate partners in telecommunications and technology. Besides New York and Illinois, education officials in Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, North Carolina and Tennessee have committed to creating such schools as well.

According to a New York Times article by Al Baker, John B. King, Jr., the state education commissioner said “When we view high-quality CTE programs, we see how engaged those students are and what clear aspirations they have for their future.”

CTE programs such as these enable students to be successful by gaining the skills and training needed through specialized programs of study. These programs achieve added strength through a partnership with IBM that provides mentoring to students and assistance to the school’s educators.

Ramona Schescke, Member Services Manager

By Ramona in News
Tags: , ,

New CRS Report Highlights NASDCTEc Work

Tuesday, October 9th, 2012

The Congressional Research Service (CRS), which provides reports and analyses to Members of Congress on a variety of policy issues, recently released a new report on Career Technical Education. The goal of the report, Career and Technical Education: A Primer, is to “support congressional discussion of initiatives designed to rationalize the workforce development system.”

The report provides an overview of CTE, walks through the delivery and structure of CTE at the secondary, postsecondary, and adult learner levels, and raises several issues facing CTE stakeholders. For example, according to the report, there are four concerns that may hinder CTE delivery at the secondary level: (1) what is the goal of CTE – to broaden the students’ education and provide early exposure to several career options or to ensure students are prepared to enter the workforce, (2) the expense of maintaining and updating the instructional resources and equipment, (3) whether CTE adds value to a college preparatory high school curriculum, and (4) that the common core standards do not define career-ready and thus may not provide immediate career preparation.

While explaining the National Career ClustersTM Framework, the report references data from NASDCTEc’s 2011 issue brief, Career Clusters and Programs of Study: State of the States. The data for this issue brief was culled from the 2010 State Profile survey. We administer this survey to our members every other year to collect a wealth of information to be used in updating the State Profiles, and to provide the basis for a number of issue briefs. We are pleased that CRS was able to utilize our data in their report!

In the section “College- and Career-Ready Standards and CTE Standards” the report highlights NASDCTEc and NCTEF’s work around the Common Career Technical Core (CCTC) as one of the two set of standards impacting CTE students. As stated in the CRS report, the CCTC was developed by 42 states, the District of Columbia, Palau, business and industry representatives, educators, and other stakeholders, and it provides standards for each of the 16 Career ClustersTM and their career pathways.

Nancy Conneely, Director of Public Policy

By Nancy in Public Policy, Publications
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Reminder: Register Now for NASDCTEc Webinar Tomorrow: CTE Trend Analysis

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

Every other year, the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc) conducts a survey of the membership to gauge trends in Career Technical Education (CTE) across the country. Based on analyses of this year’s survey results from 50 states and territories, and comparisons to surveys administered in 2008 and 2010, NASDCTEc has authored a series of synopsis papers that describe trends in four key areas: Career Clusters and Programs of Study, CTE Teacher and Faculty Shortages, Governance, and CTE Funding.

This month’s webinar will focus on the first two synopsis papers: Career Clusters and Programs of Study and CTE Teacher and Faculty Shortages.

Kara Herbertson from NASDCTEc will give an overview of trends in these areas. Collie Wells from the Alabama Department of Education will discuss Alabama’s Business and Industry Certification, awarded from the International Organization for Standardization (IOS), and how the certification ensures high quality CTE programs. Also, Linda Milstein from Brookdale Community College will discuss an alternate route for certifying CTE teachers.

Please join us for this informative webinar tomorrow, Thursday, October 4th at 3:00 pm ET. Register now!

Kara Herbertson, Research and Policy Manager

By Kara in NASDCTEc Announcements, Webinars
Tags: , ,

NASDCTEc Webinar: CTE Trend Analysis: Career Clusters/Programs of Study, CTE Teacher Shortages

Friday, September 21st, 2012

Every other year, the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc) conducts a survey of the membership to gauge trends in Career Technical Education (CTE) across the country. Based on analyses of this year’s survey results from 50 states and territories, and comparisons to surveys administered in 2008 and 2010, NASDCTEc has authored a series of synopsis papers that describe trends in four key areas: Career Clusters and Programs of Study; CTE Teacher/Faculty Shortages and Recruitment Initiatives; Governance; and CTE Funding.

This month’s webinar will focus on the first two synopsis papers: Career Clusters and Programs of Study and CTE Teacher/Faculty Shortages and Recruitment Initiatives.

Kara Herbertson, NASDCTEc’s Education Policy Analyst, will give an overview of trends in these areas. Collie Wells from the Alabama Department of Education will discuss Alabama’s Business and Industry Certification, awarded from the International Organization for Standardization (IOS), and how the certification ensures high quality CTE programs. Also, a representative from New Jersey will discuss an alternate route for certifying CTE teachers.

Join us for this informative webinar on Thursday, October 4th at 3:00 pm ET. Register now!

Kara Herbertson, Education Policy Analyst 

By Kara in Meetings and Events, Public Policy, Research, Webinars
Tags: , ,

 

Series

Archives

1