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CTE Research Review

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

A lot of new research and resources have been released over the past month. Here’s what you may have missed:

New Studies

Georgetown’s Center for Education and the Workforce has published two new reports of interest to the CTE community. The first, “College Is Just the Beginning,” examines the world of post-secondary education and training and found that roughly $1.1 trillion is spent annually.cew

Researchers split the sum between colleges and universities ($417 billion) and employers ($177 billion in formal training; $413 billion informal on-the-job training). However, that employer number comes with a caveat – employers spend more because education providers may only have a student for a handful of years while an employer may have them for decades. The study also found that federally funded job training is the smallest component, ringing in at $18 billion.

The cost of training also varies widely among industries depending on the intensity of the training. Manufacturing, for example, was found to be the most training intensive.

The center also released a new report called, “The Undereducated American,” which looks at the country’s number of college-going workers and claims that supply has failed to keep pace with growing demand since the 1980s, resulting in widening income inequality.

Other studies of note:

New Surveys and Forecasts

A new public opinion poll from the Association of American Colleges and Universities found strikingly large gaps between employers and recent college graduates regarding career readiness.

While the survey found that employers continue to overwhelmingly endorse the need for broad learning and cross-cutting employability skills, they gave their recent hires very low marks on 17 learning outcomes related to being well-prepared for careers.

Meanwhile, recent graduates held a very different view of their preparedness with some of the largest gaps being critical thinking, written communication and working with others.

Another survey of note:

New Data

A new report from the Government Accountability Office takes aim at state data systems. Despite the $640 million federal investment, the results are state systems linking education and workforce data that are riddled with holes. While the systems have had some success, there are many challenges remaining and questions about sustainability when federal funding goes away.

Other data of note:

Andrea Zimmermann, State Policy Associate

By Andrea Zimmermann in Research
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AP-Viacom Survey: Students Dissatisfied with High School Preparation

Monday, April 25th, 2011

Education stakeholders continue to stress the need to prepare college- and career-ready high school graduates. However, a recent survey reveals students’ discontent with their high school preparation, and reveals a need for more focus on the “career ready” component of college and career readiness.

The Associated Press and Viacom recently released the results of a telephone survey of over 1,100 American young adults (ages 18 to 24) to gauge their perspectives on education today. Overall, most students rated their high schools poorly in areas that would ease the transition from secondary to postsecondary education and prepare them to enter college or the workforce. Career Technical Education (CTE) aims to help students with this transition by providing a pathway from rigorous, sequential secondary coursework into postsecondary education or a career.

About half of the respondents rate their high schools as fair, poor, or very poor in preparing students for further education. An alarming 57 percent of students report their high schools as fair, poor, or very poor at helping students choose or be prepared for future careers. Many students also say that high schools fail to help students find internships or other work experience. Less than a quarter of students credit their guidance counselor for helping greatly with these issues.

Despite respondents’ reports of not being prepared for further education, two-thirds of students believe that their peers should aim to attend college, and about the same number hope to attain a four-year degree themselves. However, according the Bureau of Labor Statistics, only about one-third of today’s 25-to-34 year olds hold a bachelor’s degree or higher, and less than 10 percent receive an associate degree. This presents an alarming mismatch because, despite plans to attend college, many students are not attending or completing a postsecondary credential or certificate. As the survey results show, students entering the workforce after high school do not feel adequately prepared for this transition.

To access the survey results, please visit The AP-Viacom Survey of Youth on Education.

By Kara in News
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