Posts Tagged ‘Washington DC’

New Skills for Youth Innovation Site Snapshots Released

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2020

Launched in 2016, JPMorgan Chase & Co. New Skills for Youth is a $75 million, five-year global initiative aimed at transforming how cities and states ensure that young people are career ready. In addition to the state-based investments, which Advance CTE led in partnership with the Council of Chief State School Officers and Education Strategy Group, JPMorgan Chase also invested in local innovation sites across the globe.

Today, Advance CTE released snapshots on two of these innovation sites, which document the progress of the local investments that aim to identify and implement the most promising ideas in career education, with a special focus on communities with the greatest needs. While each site has its unique context, each is working to improve and expand career pathways, hands-on work-based learning experiences and provide support for learners through sustainable partnerships between the education community and business and industry.

The two snapshots:

Greater Washington Region developed a four-year initiative to explore how the public and private sectors can work together to grow the local Information Technology (IT) economy throughout the Washington DC region.

Germany has launched the Zukunftsträger initiative to improve transitions from school to the workforce for the country’s vulnerable youth populations. 

While each site has its unique context, each is working to improve and expand career pathways, hands-on work-based learning experiences and provide support for learners through sustainable partnerships between the education community and business and industry. In total, over 205,000 students have been impacted by the local investments from JPMorgan Chase & Co. New Skills for Youth initiative, with the investments spanning over twelve sites in thirteen countries across four continents.

Each New Skill for Youth Innovation Site snapshot is now in our resource center. Review the total impact from all innovation sites in the summary report

Help us share!
Tweet: Over 205,000 students have been impacted by @jpmorgan and the New Skills for Youth local investments. The most recent snapshots of the Greater Washington Region and Germany have now been released by @CTEWorks. View their impacts at https://careertech.org/resource/series/nsfy-innovation-sites #CTEWorks

By Brittany Cannady in Resources
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State CTE Policy Update

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

State Map

Last month, Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin signed a bill into law mandating three years of both mathematics and science for graduation (up from two years of each).  The bill also allows for more flexibility in how mathematics and science requirements can be met; a computer science course, for example, can count as a mathematics credit and certain CTE courses may apply towards either content area as well. Wisconsin already has a process in place for awarding academic credit for technical courses (the CTE equivalency credit), which is now being expanded.

Also in December, Washington DC became the ninth “state” to adopt the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), joining Delaware, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington.

A state legislator in Indiana recently announced new work on a bill that would offer a new diploma focused on CTE. While details are limited at this time, the bill would create a process for CTE-focused courses and curricula to be developed that would allow students to meet the 20 credits currently required by the state’s default graduation requirement – the Core 40 – more flexibly.

The Computing Education Blog analyzed the 2013 data on the AP Computer Science exam and found that in three states – Mississippi, Montana and Wyoming – no female students took that AP exam, and the state with the highest percentage of female test-takers (Tennessee), females still only represented 29% of all test takers. Additionally no Black students took the exam in 11 states - Alaska, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Utah and Wyoming. Given the high demand in the IT field – from computer support specialists and programmers to designers and engineers – these trends are particularly troubling, although a nunber of states, such as Wisconsin (as described above) and Washington, are trying to upend this trend by allowing AP Computer Science courses to count towards core math and science requirements.

And, finally, in news that will impact a number of states, ACT has announced they will be phasing out the Explore and PLAN tests, their 8th and 10th grade tests, which are aligned with the 11th grade ACT. This decision marks a shift for ACT away from their current assessment system to Aspire, their new line of 3-8 assessments, which will be aligned to the Common Core State Standards.  Alabama has already begun using the Aspire system this school year, the first and only state to fully commit to the assessment system at this time.

Kate Blosveren, Associate Executive Director

By Kate Blosveren Kreamer in Public Policy, Uncategorized
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