This Week in CTE

October 23rd, 2020

We have compiled a list of highlights in Career Technical Education (CTE) from this week to share with you.

CAREERS IN CONSTRUCTION MONTH

Build Your Future is hosting a construction video contest, I BUILT THIS, and giving away more than $20,000 in prizes. Learn more and submit a video here.

During Careers in Construction month, utilize these classroom resources to engage with students about the opportunities in the construction industry.

TWEET OF THE THE WEEK

Essex North Shore Agricultural & Technical School in Massachusetts has relied on their mobile classroom to ensure learners across the district have access to hands-on learning and career training. 

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE OF THE WEEK

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced this week that the Federal Work Study (FWS) Experimental Sites will receive additional funding. This initiative seeks to increase earn-and-learn opportunities by removing barriers to off-campus jobs, allowing increased work hours and allowing institutions to pay students for work-based learning. The increased funds will be used for FWS salaries and to develop Job Location and Development (JLD) programs. Further information can be found here.   

INITIATIVE OF THE WEEK

Advance CTE is honored and excited to co-lead the New Skills ready network

RESOURCE OF THE WEEK

Youth apprenticeship programs can give students access to valuable work-based learning experiences that provide insights into how their interest can connect to education and the workforce. Although these programs are often beneficial for participants, there is little data to show the programmatic landscape and impact.

The Role of Data and Accountability in Growing Youth Apprenticeship Programs highlights current practices from states who are collecting data on youth apprenticeship programs, and what steps have been taken to collect high quality enrollment and outcomes data. 

View The Role of Data and Accountability in Growing Youth Apprenticeship Programs in our Learning that Works Resource Center.

Brittany Cannady, Digital Media Associate

Getting To Know Advance CTE’s Work to Advance Employer Engagement

October 22nd, 2020

The “Getting to Know” blog series will feature the work of State CTE Directors, state and federal policies, innovative programs and new initiatives from the Advance CTE staff. Learn more about each one of these topics and the unique contributions to advancing Career Technical Education (CTE) that Advance CTE’s members work on every day.

Meet Meghan Wills! Meghan is Director of Strategic Initiatives at Advance CTE; she’s been with the organization since August 2019. Meghan leads Advance CTE’s state policy and technical assistance work, including supporting the expansion of high-quality career pathways, providing technical assistance to states as they implement their Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V) state plans, and modernizing The National Career ClustersⓇ Framework. 

Q: Through your work at Advance CTE, how have you seen employer engagement prioritized in high-quality CTE programs?

A: As a result of Perkins V, employers have more opportunities than ever before to become active participants in developing high-quality CTE programs. Through the comprehensive local needs assessment (CLNA), employers can identify local workforce needs and high-skill, high-wage, in-demand occupations in their community and ensure that CTE programs and programs of study are aligned to those needs and opportunities. Work-based learning is a critical component of high-quality CTE programs, and the strongest work-based learning experiences are co-developed by employers and the education system to meet both learners’ and employers’ needs. Finally, employers and industry experts are serving as classroom instructors and industry mentors, which provide learners with invaluable opportunities to directly learn from experts in the field.

Q: What are the common barriers to effective employer engagement?

A: One of the biggest challenges employers face when trying to become more engaged in CTE programs is that the education system and employers speak very different languages. Employers are focused on skills their employees will need in the workplace, but they often feel that those skills are not sufficiently emphasized in the education system. Another challenge is that employers often don’t know where to start to become more engaged in CTE programs; while there are a number of opportunities for them to do so, which I described earlier, employers often don’t know about those opportunities or don’t know who they should contact to become more involved.  

Q: What future opportunities do you anticipate for the intersect between CTE and employers?

A: As the country looks ahead to the recovery from COVID-19 (coronavirus), CTE programs can play a strong role in helping prepare learners for jobs of the future, as described in our recent fact sheet CTE Prepares Learners for the Future of Work. The coronavirus accelerated the pace of technological change, and workers in the near future will require a different set of skills to be successful in the workplace. CTE programs, with their strong emphasis on hands-on learning and real-world skills, help learners develop foundational skills that can easily be transferred across rapidly shifting sectors and work activities. As employers remain actively engaged in CTE programs, they can continue to ensure that CTE learners are well prepared with future-oriented foundational skills.

Employers eager to get involved with CTE in their state or local communities can leverage: 

COVID-19 Federal Response and Recovery: Recap Part Two

October 21st, 2020

Over the past eight months Congress has taken action to respond to the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) pandemic, with varying results. This included passing stimulus packages, as well as introducing a number of bills that were never passed- or at times even brought to vote. Advance CTE will recap what has gone on in Congress regarding Coronavirus response and recovery in a new blog series. Check out last week’s refresher on the CARES Act here!

Since the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act- a $2.2 trillion comprehensive economic relief package- was passed in March, Congress has introduced many stimulus bills that included funding for education and workforce programs, as well as Career Technical Education (CTE) supports. However, none of those proposals saw any legislative movement. Some bills were voted on by one chamber of Congress while others were never brought to a vote at all. 

Relaunching America’s Workforce Act (RAWA): In May, RAWA was introduced in both the House and Senate. This bill focused on supporting CTE and workforce development programs as a result of the pandemic with a $15 billion investment that includes $1 billion to support CTE programs and activities, as well as $2 billion to re-implement the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant program. RAWA also included the following proposals through the Strengthening Career and Technical for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V):

  • Offered flexibility at the state and local levels during the pandemic around retention of funds, so that any funds not used during the 2019-2020 academic year because of Coronavirus can be retained instead of returned to the state for redistribution. 
  • Provided flexibility for local Perkins recipients to pool funds in order to support secondary to postsecondary or employment transitions for CTE students whose academic year was altered due to the pandemic. 
  • Waived some of the professional development requirements during the pandemic. 
  • Authorized $1 billion for CTE programs and activities, such as digital and physical infrastructure, virtual academic and work-based learning, restocking supplies that were donated to Coronavirus response efforts, work-based learning supports and subsidies for students and employers and ensuring programs are responsive to updated comprehensive needs assessments as a result Coronavirus. 

RAWA was not voted on in the House or the Senate. 

Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions (HEROES) Act:  House Democrats introduced the HEROES Act, a $3 trillion relief package, in May. This included $100.15 billion for education comprised of $90 billion in formula grants for K-12 education and $10.15 billion for higher education. It would have also provided $3.1 billion for the U.S. Department of Labor, with $2 billion allocated to worker training. The proposal included some flexibilities related to Perkins V: 

  • Flexibility at the state and local levels during the pandemic for retention of funds so that funds not used during the 2019-2020 school year because of Coronavirus can be retained; 
  • Flexibility for local Perkins recipients to pool funds for supporting secondary to postsecondary or employment transitions for CTE students whose academic year was changed because of Coronavirus; and 
  • Waived some of the professional development requirements during the pandemic. 

The HEROES Act passed in the House and was not brought to a vote in the Senate.

Coronavirus Child Care and Education Relief Act (CCCERA): Senate Democrats introduced CCCERA, a bill that would have provided $430 billion for child care and education activities, in July. The proposed act allocated $1 billion for CTE programs and activities to support state and local CTE needs as a result of the pandemic. This could include updates to physical or digital infrastructure, or expansion of work-based learning supports. The bill included $345 billion for the Education Stabilization Fund- comprised of $175 billion for K-12 schools, $132 billion for higher education and $33 billion for a Governor’s Fund. Additionally, CCCERA would have provided $4 billion to the Federal Communication Commission’s E-Rate program to increase internet access for students and educators. 

CCCERA was not brought to a vote in the House or the Senate. 

Health, Economic Assistance, Liability and Schools (HEALS) Act: Senate Republicans introduced the HEALS Act, a $1 trillion proposal for a comprehensive relief package, in August. Included in this is $105 billion for an Education Stabilization Fund comprised of $70 billion for K-12 education (of which two-thirds are required to go to local education agencies that meet requirements to open in person), $29 billion for higher education and $5 billion for a Governor’s Emergency Relief Fund. It also would provide the Perkins V flexibilities around pooling of funds, retention of funds and professional development that were outlined in RAWA.

The HEALS Act was not brought to vote in the House or the Senate. 

HEROES 2.0: At the end of September, House Democrats introduced a revised version of the HEROES Act, or HEROES 2.0. This $2.2 trillion relief package includes $208.1 billion for an Education Stabilized fund, comprised of $175 billion for K-12 education, $27 billion for public postsecondary education (with 75 percent distributed based on the number of Pell-grant eligible students), $4 billion for governors to use on education (including restoring state and local education support) and $2 billion for the Bureau of Indian Education and tribal colleges. The proposal also includes an additional $11.9 billion for higher education, including private institutions of higher education. 

HEROES 2.0 was passed by the House in the beginning of October. 

Meredith Hills, Senior Associate for Federal Policy

Announcing the New Skills ready network

October 20th, 2020

Today, JPMorgan Chase announced the full cohort of U.S. based sites receiving career readiness investments as part of the company’s $75 million New Skills at Work initiative. This effort is designed to better prepare young people, and particular Black and Latinx learners, for the future of work and lifelong success.

The U.S. sites – which comprise the New Skills ready network – are Boston|Massachusetts, Columbus|Ohio, Dallas|Texas, Denver|Colorado, Indianapolis|Indiana and Nashville|Tennessee. They will be joined by four international sites that will be announced in the coming months that will round out the global investment.

What makes these five-year, $7 million investments so unique is that each site has brought together a cross-sector partnership of local K-12 school systems, two- and four-year institutions of higher education, employers, and state agencies to develop and scale equitable, high-quality career pathways. Advance CTE is excited to be working with these state and local leaders over the next five years, in partnership with Education Strategy Group, to help them strengthen their systems, policies and practices to provide greater opportunities for each and every learner.

The six sites will have regular and ongoing opportunities to learn from each other, build shared solutions to common challenges, and provide lessons learned that can benefit pathways and learners in communities across the country. Work has been underway over the past six months, and all sites stand ready to begin implementing their year one action plans to attend to equity gaps, improve data capacity and sharing, strengthen public-private partnerships and build key supports for learners, among other foundational priorities.

“Advance CTE is honored and excited to continue our relationship with JPMorgan Chase & Co. as a co-lead of the New Skills ready network. Career Technical Education is more important than ever in today’s economy, striving to provide each learner with equitable access to the knowledge and real-world skills that prepare them for careers in essential industries. I am confident that this important work, across the six states and sites, will create transformative career pathways and inspire innovative policy that will ensure more learners can use their passion and talents throughout their education, resulting in a lifetime of career success. We look forward to continuing this work in partnership with Education Strategy Group and JPMorgan Chase & Co.” said Kimberly Green, Executive Director, Advance CTE.

Read JPMorgan Chase’s full press release and Education Strategy Group’s blog to learn more about the initiative and progress to date.

Kate Kreamer, Deputy Executive Director

COVID-19 Federal Response and Recovery: Recap Part One

October 15th, 2020

Over the past eight months Congress has taken action to respond to the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) pandemic, with varying results. This included passing stimulus packages, as well as introducing a number of bills that were never passed- or at times even brought to vote. Advance CTE will recap what has gone on in Congress regarding Coronavirus response and recovery in a new blog series. Check back next week for part two!

In March, Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act (H.R.748). The $2.2 trillion stimulus package provided comprehensive economic relief and resources as a result of COVID-19 (Coronavirus), including funding and flexibilities for education and workforce development programs. The CARES Act was the last stimulus package that was passed by Congress and signed into law. 

Education Stabilization Fund
The CARES Act authorized $30.75 billion for the Education Stabilization Fund, which provided funding to states, school districts and institutions of higher education for costs related to Coronavirus. The breakdown of funds is as follows:  

  • $13.5 billion for the Elementary and Secondary Emergency Relief Fund (ESERF)
    Money was distributed to the State Education Agency (SEA) through a formula. From there 90 percent went to Local Education Agencies (LEAs) for activities in response to Coronavirus.
  • $3 billion for the Governors Emergency Relief Fund (GEERF)
    Funding was distributed to states based on a formula that took population and poverty into account, and the SEA then determined which LEA received funds. The governor could also determine which higher education institution received funding, as well as designate any institution of higher education, LEA, or “education related entity” as essential for carrying out emergency education services. 
  • $14.25 billion for the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund (HEERF)
    Of this, $12.557 billion was allocated to institutions that were eligible for Tile IV funding under the Higher Education Act. $348.8 million went to the improvement of postsecondary education program, and 50 percent of that needed to be used for students. Finally, $1.046 billion went to Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs).

Of the Education Stabilization Fund, one percent was allotted for competitive grants to states most affected by Coronavirus: 

  • Rethink K-12 Education Models Grant: This competitive grant provides funding to support states in serving their students during the pandemic through new and innovative strategies. The participating states are Georgia, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, North Carolina, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee and Texas, and award amounts range from $6 million to $20 million.
  • Reimagining Workforce Preparation Grants: This competitive grant provides funding to either expand education opportunities through short-term career pathways or sector-based education and training programs, or to support local entrepreneurship through small business incubators. The participating states are Alabama, Arkansas, California, Hawaii, Michigan, Nevada, New York and Virginia. 

National Emergency Education Waivers
This bill provided opportunities for the SEA, Indian tribe or LEA to request waivers of certain statutory and regulatory provisions. 

Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund
SEAs could apply for emergency relief grants to be used in elementary and secondary schools. 

Additional Measures in the CARES Act

  • Authority for the Secretary of Education to provide waivers from the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, except civil rights laws, that are necessary in response to Coronavirus;
  • Temporary relief for federal student loan borrowers to defer payments, principal and interest for 6 months. This also gives flexibility to students with federal student loans that dropped out of school as a result of Coronavirus;
  • Allows postsecondary students at institutions that closed because of Coronavirus to discount that semester toward their lifetime Pell eligibility; 
  • Continues federal work study payments to students who are no longer able to work as a result of closures;
  • Flexibility for local workforce boards to use Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) funds for administrative costs (such as digital resources); 
  • $360 million for the Department of Labor to invest in programs to support training and services for dislocated workers, seniors, migrant farmworkers and homeless veterans; and
  • Pandemic Unemployment Assistance to provide unemployment insurance for those who would not typically be covered, but cannot work as a result of Coronavirus.

Meredith Hills, Senior Associate for Federal Policy

Recap of CTE Forward: A Summit on CTE’s Impact & Promise

October 14th, 2020

Last month, Advance CTE and nine organizations representing education, workforce and employers hosted CTE Forward: A Summit on CTE’s Impact and Promise. The virtual event spanned two days and brought together nearly 200 leaders representing the Career Technical Education (CTE) continuum to collaborate, reimagine and contribute to a bold vision for CTE. 

The CTE Forward Summit built on Advance CTE’s previous national Summits – held every five years – and will lead to the development of a shared vision for CTE. This vision, which must be both daring and measurable, will serve as the “true north” for the CTE community and its key partners in the coming years as we work to raise the quality of CTE pathways, ensure each learner has access to and the supports needed to be successful in those pathways and provide economic opportunity for everyone.

To kick off the event, participants were asked to examine the many disruptions impacting all aspects of the nation’s systems today – from the economy to technology to the education system – unpacking the innovations that can and should be generated from disruptive forces impacting our society and CTE.

Participants also discussed the foundational commitments, or the non-negotiable elements of high-quality and equitable CTE that are essential to meeting the needs of learners and employers and supporting our nation’s continued economic vitality, competitiveness and growth in the future.

As sessions built on each other over the two days, the group discussed desired outcomes where they visualized a stronger, more responsive and more equitable CTE system and began to lay out a roadmap to build that system. These forward-looking, bold and daring ideas gathered during those sessions will define CTE’s impact and promise in the future.

“We have to look at things from a systems perspective, recognizing that the systems have been set up to get the outcomes they get. If we want different outcomes, then the systems have to be reimagined.”

“That CTE means more than just Perkins and Perkins funding.”

“Everyone is ready for a true system transformation.”

“This is the way we’ve always done it, well we shouldn’t do it this way anymore.”

Our Partners

We were incredibly thankful for the amazing participation from not only the Summit contributors but also from our co-convenors: 

  • Association for Career and Technical Education 
  • Council of Chief State School Officers 
  • National Association of State Boards of Education 
  • National Association of State Workforce Agencies 
  • National Conference of State Legislatures 
  • National Governors Association 
  • National Skills Coalition 
  • State Higher Education Executive Officers 
  • U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation 

This also wouldn’t have been possible without support from the Summit Sponsors

  • Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation 
  • Siemens Foundation 
  • ECMC Foundation 
  • Strada Education Network 
  • JPMorgan Chase & Co. 
  • Lumina Foundation 

You can hear about why they chose to support the CTE Forward Summit in the short videos linked above. 

Next Steps

Over the coming months, Advance CTE, with input from the co-conveners, will develop a vision for CTE and release it in Spring 2021. This vision will be used by state leaders to continue to ensure that no matter what the country looks like now and in the future, CTE remains high quality, forward-focused, and equitable so that each and every learner has the opportunity for career success. 

Katie Fitzgerald, Director of Communications and Membership

This Week in CTE

October 9th, 2020

We have compiled a list of highlights in Career Technical Education (CTE) from this week to share with you.

CAREERS IN CONSTRUCTION MONTH

Throughout the month of October, we will celebrate careers in construction. Utilize these classroom resources to engage with students about the opportunities in the construction industry.

 

CTSO OF THE WEEK

National Technical Student Association (TSA) Week concluded with friendship day! Follow the hashtag #TogetherTSA on Twitter for more from the week.

COMPETITION OF THE WEEK

Social Finance and JFF have announced the 2020 Career and Technical Education Through Pay for Success Competition. This competition will expand the reach of high-quality CTE to under-served, high-need youth by offering free technical assistance to awardees to scale programs to achieve data-driven results with long-term sustainability.

The deadline for Perkins-eligible CTE providers to notify Social Finance and JFF of intent to apply is October 16, 2020— please email solicitations@socialfinance.org. Requests for proposals and more information can be found here

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

Wisconsin is attracting talent to the manufacturing industry with this video. Happy Manufacturing Month! 

RESOURCE OF THE WEEK

Advance CTE, in partnership with the National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE), has published a new resource as part of the Making Good on the Promise series, which outlines state CTE leaders’ critical responsibility to advancing equitable access and success in CTE for individuals experiencing homelessness.

This new resource identifies common access barriers to high-quality CTE and strategies to support learners experiencing homelessness. Key action steps are included for state CTE leaders and state coordinators for homeless education to consider when developing and growing homeless education partnerships in their state.

View Making Good on the Promise: Improving Equity in and Access to Quality CTE Programs for Students Experiencing Homelessness in our Learning that Works Resource Center.

Brittany Cannady, Digital Media Associate

New Resource on Short-Term Postsecondary Programs

October 8th, 2020

This week the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) released a new research report on the national landscape of short-term postsecondary programs- An Analysis of Existing Short-Term Postsecondary Programs. Advance CTE and the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) contributed to the final report with information collected from each organization’s membership about the impact, barriers and opportunity for these programs.

The resource defines short-term programs, outlines some of the funding mechanisms that exist, shares out the results of a survey sent to Advance CTE, ACTE and NASFAA memberships and chronicles interviews and focus group discussions with state and local Career Technical Education (CTE) leaders. Key findings from the research include: 

  • “The majority of institutions agree or strongly agree that their short-term programs benefit the local economy, adult learners, and other students, and that expanding short-term programs is of interest to industry representatives, educators, and local leaders.
  • The most common short-term credentials offered by participants in our study are in health care and transportation fields.
  • The business sector is one of the most significant driving forces behind short-term program development. Employers offer input into program designs to provide students with in-demand skills.
  • Institutions often face difficulty filling short-term programs with sufficient enrollments because prospective students cannot afford the costs, and colleges can be reluctant to build short-term certificate programs that are not financial aid eligible, even when they would benefit students and employers.
  • Just over half of programs offered by institutional survey respondents are eligible under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).
  • Many short-term certificates are already embedded in longer certificate or degree programs, or are considered “stackable” credentials that build upon previous credentials and may feed into degree programs.
  • States and institutions would be interested in offering more short-term programs if the programs were eligible for Federal Pell Grants and could serve more students.
  • Even if short-term programs became eligible for federal financial aid, however, most institutions stated they could not shorten many existing programs because of state, industry, and academic standards.”

The survey results and interviews with Advance CTE membership show a clear desire from state CTE leaders to grow and improve short-term postsecondary programs. The positive benefits these programs have on career growth is a motivating factor for key stakeholders to continue to build these programs and figure out solutions to challenges such as funding and lack of data collection.

Meredith Hills, Senior Associate for Federal Policy

Getting to Know Wisconsin’s Cultural Support Specialists

October 7th, 2020

The “Getting to Know” blog series will feature the work of State CTE Directors, state and federal policies, innovative programs and new initiatives from the Advance CTE staff. Learn more about each one of these topics and the unique contributions to advancing Career Technical Education (CTE) that Advance CTE’s members work on every day.

Advance CTE’s commitment to closing achievement and equity gaps drives the work of improving equity and access for each learner in high-quality CTE. It is that lens that is applied to analyze policies or feature new resources

One state policy that addresses identifiable equity gaps is Wisconsin’s Fox Valley Technical College Cultural Support Specialists. Wisconsin took great strides toward making postsecondary degree attainment more accessible when the state developed Cultural Support Specialist positions. Black learners in the state were earning degrees from the Wisconsin Technical College System at lower rates than White and Asian learners. Fox Valley Technical College of the Wisconsin Technical College System and the Appleton Area School District partnered to create the Cultural Support Specialist position, a joint position between the two institutions responsible for helping students transition from high school to college and overcome some of the structural, social, and cultural barriers that can prevent first generation learners of color from accessing and succeeding in college. 

What makes the Cultural Support Specialist positions unique is: 

  • The case management approach, individualized for each learner;
  • The liaison role between schools and families, connecting culture to academic success; and
  • The cultural competency the specialists carry while demographically representing the students they serve. 

Read more about the Cultural Support Specialists in Wisconsin by viewing the full policy profile in our Learning that Works Resource Center

View past entries and stay up to date with the “Getting to Know” series here.

Brittany Cannady, Digital Media Associate

Improving Equity in and Access to Quality CTE Programs for Students Experiencing Homelessness

October 5th, 2020

Intentional and early collaboration between state and local leaders and state coordinators for homeless education is vital to developing solutions that ensure success in Career Technical Education (CTE) programs for learners experiencing homelessness. As many states anticipate the growing rates of homelessness to continue in the coming years, the need for partnerships between state and local leaders and state coordinators for homeless education is far greater in order to increase learner success for these learners.

Advance CTE in partnership with the National Center for Homeless Education (NCHE) has published Making Good on the Promise: Improving Equity in and Access to Quality CTE Programs for Students Experiencing Homelessness for state and local leaders to leverage as they begin this body of work. 

The Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V) expanded the definition of special populations to include individuals experiencing homelessness, as defined by Subtitle VII-B of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. State leaders have before them a clear path for ensuring state supports increase equity and access to high-quality CTE programs for learners experiencing homelessness. 

Research shows that learners who are enrolled and complete CTE courses are more likely to complete high school or earn an equivalent graduation degree and decrease the likeness of experiencing homelessness. [1] While there is great benefit to completing CTE programs for learners experiencing homelessness, acknowledging the access barriers and developing targeted strategies to support this population remain a challenge for states. 

This new resource identifies common barriers to high-quality CTE and suggests strategies for how CTE and homeless education leaders can work together to build new opportunities for learners experiencing homelessness in their state to access and succeed in CTE programs. 

State leaders can start, today, building key partnerships by implementing these action steps:

  1. Reach out and connect with the appropriate CTE or homeless education counterpart.
  2. Focus on concrete efforts with mutual benefit to each other’s work.
  3. Start somewhere and build confidence in the partnership.
  4. Continue to invest over time.

 

Leverage these state examples on how to drive focus and leverage data insights when supporting learners experiencing homelessness:

  • Kentucky’s Perkins V State Steering Committee includes both state- and local-level homeless stakeholder representation. Kentucky also targets CTE program recruitment efforts to learners experiencing homelessness by distributing informational materials in places these learners may frequent.
  • Arizona hired a special populations/grant program specialist to serve as a statewide resource for secondary/postsecondary CTE services for special populations.
  • Montana’s Data Review Board includes a state homeless coordinator and plans to meet twice a year to review disaggregated data, share program updates, and plan needed technical assistance for local educational agencies. 

This resource is part of the Making Good on the Promise series, which confronts the negative aspects of CTE’s legacy and defines the key challenges learners face today. The series provides promising solutions to help state leaders close equity gaps in CTE to ensure that each learner is able to attain the promise of CTE — a high-skill, high-wage, in-demand career. 

Kate Kreamer, Deputy Executive Director

[1] Washington Office of Superintendent of Public of Public Instruction. (n.d.). [Unpublished data].

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