This Week in CTE

September 13th, 2019

TWEET OF THE WEEK

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE WEEK

FY2020 Appropriations Process Continues 

Congress returned from the six-week summer recess this week with the intention of moving forward with the Fiscal Year 2020 (FY20) appropriations process following the budget deal that was reached right before break. The Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (Labor-HHS-Education) was scheduled to markup their FY20 appropriations bill on Tuesday, September 10. However, Senate Appropriations Committee Chair Richard Shelby (R-AL) postponed this markup shortly before it was scheduled to begin due to partisan disagreements about the bill. The disagreements mainly revolved around the funding level, as well as policy amendments attached to the bill. 

Read the full blog here.

To make sure you get the latest news and resources about federal policy that affects Career Technical Education (CTE), sign up for our Legislative Updates!

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

Henderson County Students Certified After Disaster Training

Henderson County High School in Kentucky received the 2019 Excellence in Action award for its Health Science program of study. As learners progress through the program, they can focus on one of the following areas: Allied Health, Pre-Nursing and Medical Administrative Assistant. Regardless of their focus area, all seniors are required to participate in one of the work-based learning experiences offered at 47 local healthcare facilities. Through dual credit courses, health science learners can earn up to 12 college credits, as well as five industry-recognized credentials, ensuring learners are ready to continue their education or enter the workplace. 

For example, learners in the allied health career pathway are trained in emergency preparedness. To become community emergency response team certified, learners have to complete an accident simulation, supported by partners such as the county fire department, police department, local hospitals and others. More than 200 juniors have earned this national certification over the past four years.

Watch this news segment highlighting a disaster training simulation that is part of the certification process for learners. The segment even features Jessica Sheffer the program instructor. 

Watch the video here.

Read more about the award winner here.

RESOURCE OF THE WEEK

The Data Quality Campaign officially released the findings from their 2019 national poll of parents and teachers. The national poll of teachers found they are strongly committed to using data in service of students – but are left on their own to make this happen. Policymakers and school leaders are missing critical moments throughout teachers’ careers and these missed opportunities are driving teachers to build their own capacity to put data to work. Read the brief that highlights the burdens that teachers are facing in using data and the actions leaders can take to make data use in the classroom a more seamless part of the school day.

Learn more here.

FY2020 Appropriations Process, Secretary DeVos Visits CTE Programs in Alaska

September 12th, 2019

News this Week

Congress returned this week after a six-week recess, and continued with the Fiscal Year 2020 appropriations process. Read below to learn more about the appropriations outlook, Secretary DeVos’s recent visit to Career Technical Education programs in Alaska and a new article about collaboration between education and foster care services. 

FY2020 Appropriations Process Continues 

Congress returned from the six-week summer recess this week with the intention of moving forward with the Fiscal Year 2020 (FY20) appropriations process following the budget deal that was reached right before break. The Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (Labor-HHS-Education) was scheduled to markup their FY20 appropriations bill on Tuesday, September 10. However, Senate Appropriations Committee Chair Richard Shelby (R-AL) postponed this markup shortly before it was scheduled to begin due to partisan disagreements about the bill. The disagreements mainly revolved around the funding level, as well as policy amendments attached to the bill. 

Earlier today, the Senate Appropriations Committee voted on the spending levels for each of the 12 appropriations bills, passing on party lines. Although the Labor-HHS-Education appropriations bill has not been shared with the public, the allocation for Labor-HHS-Education is $187.7 billion- just about a 1% increase over FY19 funding. As a reminder, the House Labor-HHS-Education appropriations bill that was passed earlier this summer included about a 6% increase over FY19 funding.  

Federal funding runs out on September 30, and appropriators are now working to come to an agreement before that time. One possible outcome is that Congress will pass a short-term funding bill, or a continuing resolution, to extend current funding levels while continuing to work on the full long-term funding bill. 

Advance CTE will continue to provide updates as additional information becomes available. 

Secretary DeVos Visits Career Technical Education Programs in Alaska 

Recently, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos traveled to Alaska to visit two Career Technical Education (CTE) programs and learn more about existing CTE opportunities in the state. Secretary DeVos first observed students at King Tech High School in Anchorage. King Tech High School offers CTE programs in 25 occupations and provides learners with the skills to be successful in both college and a career. Next, Secretary DeVos visited the Northwestern Alaska Career & Technical Center (NACTEC), located on the Nome-Beltz Jr./Sr. High School campus. NACTEC classes are open to learners across the region.

New Article Shares Recommendations for Supporting Learners in Foster Care

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) pushes local education agencies to collaborate with foster care services and coordinate supports for students. Perkins V also focuses on youth in foster care by adding them to the list of special populations and requiring states to review and report disaggregated performance data. In many states, these requirements will involve new processes and relationships, but they are ultimately designed to support the success of students in foster care. In this article, advocates in California lay out a series of recommendations and opportunities to foster stronger collaboration between education and foster care services at both the state and local level. 

Meredith Hills, Policy Associate

Detroit Investment Creates an Opportunity for the District-wide Expansion of Career Pathways

September 10th, 2019

The Linked Learning model – an approach that combines rigorous academic coursework, Career Technical Education (CTE), work-based learning experiences and comprehensive support services – is expanding to 21 high schools by 2021 across Detroit to support students in their college and career goals. What began as a school-by-school turnaround strategy has evolved into a cohesive and strategic approach for the Detroit Public School Community District (DPSCD). At the direction of a new superintendent, Dr. Nikolai Vitti, each high school will have an established career academy with a focus on a specific career pathway by 2021.

Building off of efforts spearheaded by United Way, this effort is focused on creating career pathways that result in meaningful certifications aligned to high-growth and high-wage careers. United Way is playing an integral role by providing staff support directly to schools and serving on the Workforce Partnership Initiative (WPI) team representing DPSCD, the Mayor’s Office, Detroit Employment Solutions Corporation, United Way, and the Wayne County Community College District (WCCCD), to undertake a two-year engagement to design a strategy and holistic plan to integrating the Linked Learning model across DPSCD.

A linchpin of the program is the targeted support services that do work on the ground to ensure goals are being achieved. This includes:

  • Pathways Coaches that guide the development of the program of study, support project development and implementation and identify funding streams;
  • Work-based Learning Directors who develop Pathway Advisory Boards, recruit employer partners for work-based learning opportunities; and
  • New District-funded position to lead the transition of the work being completely managed and sustained by the District. 

“We know the surest way to expand access to opportunity is to equip people with the skills needed to compete for well-paying, in-demand jobs that are available today and tomorrow,” said John Carter, President, Michigan Middle Market, Commercial Bank, JPMorgan Chase. “That’s why we are investing to design and implement innovative new approaches to career education that prepare young people to enter the workforce with the skills, experiences, and credentials they need to succeed in good careers in growing industries.”

Linked Learning Detroit is a JPMorgan Chase & Co. New Skills for Youth Innovation Site aiming to improve career pathways for learners. This snapshot is part of a series documenting the progress of the local investments from across the globe that aim to identify and implement the most promising ideas in career education, with a special focus on communities with the greatest needs. Learn more about the innovations sites here.

This Week in CTE

September 6th, 2019

TWEET OF THE WEEK

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE WEEK

We’re Hiring!

Senior Associate, Member Engagement & Professional Learning

Advance CTE is hiring a Senior Associate, Member Engagement & Professional Learning who will be responsible for coordinating outreach and engagement with Advance CTE members, leading member-focused professional learning efforts, ensuring the organization is anticipating and meeting members’ needs, and helping to advance our organizational goals. This position has the unique opportunity to design and implement a strategy that engages education and workforce leaders from across the country both in-person and virtually.

The ideal candidate will be a problem solver, enjoy engaging directly with a range of individuals and be a team player committed to getting results in a fast-paced environment. This position provides an opportunity to have a direct impact on education policy by supporting state leaders working to ensure every student has access to high-quality Career Technical Education (CTE). 

How to Apply: Please submit a cover letter, resume, two writing samples, a list of at least three professional references and salary requirements to careers@careertech.org by September 13, 2019. Learn more here

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

The Dorsey Film program at Susan Miller Dorsey High School in CA is a 2019 Excellence in Action award winner in the Arts, A/V Technology & Communications Career Cluster®. Want to see the high-quality work these students produce check out their website here

Here’s one example: https://youtu.be/vAt-MMyEJpU

RESOURCE OF THE WEEK

A new data explorer on Achieve’s Graduating Ready website dives into student outcomes and college and career readiness across the United States. The explorer compiles publicly-available state-reported data on student outcomes on eight different indicators of college and career readiness – including graduation rate, assessment proficiency, AP and dual enrollment, postsecondary enrollment, and more. The project shows that there remains much room for improvement in states’ public reporting in terms of breaking data down by student subgroups, reporting it in a timely manner, and in how students are counted. Check it out to see the information your state reports – and doesn’t.

Learn more here: https://highschool.achieve.org/college-and-career-ready-student-outcomes-data-explorer

 

 

National Workforce Development Month

September 5th, 2019

This September is officially designated as “National Workforce Development Month,” following last month’s Senate passing of bipartisan resolution S.Res.304. The resolution explains workforce development as the education, training and career advancement of the country’s workforce, and raises workforce development as pivotal to competing in the global economy. 

Career Technical Education (CTE) is called out in the resolution as a vital component of workforce development. It is noted that CTE participation decreases the risk of dropping out of high school, as well as increases high school graduation rates. The resolution also shares that the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V) supports high quality CTE programs by providing academic and technical skills to 12 million learners.

The resolution was introduced by Senators Diane Feinstein (D-CA) and Mike Enzi (R-WY), as well as Co-Chairs of the Senate CTE Caucus, Senators Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) and Todd Young (R-IN). In total, 29 Democratic and Republican senators co-sponsored this resolution. 

Dallas County Promise Provides Learners with the Skills Employers Need

September 5th, 2019

Dallas County, Texas – like many communities across the country – is grappling with a lack of a skilled talent pipeline for its growing industries, in large part due to the lack of affordability and supports for postsecondary education. In Dallas County, only 37 percent of adults have a two- or four-year degree, yet 65 percent of living-wage jobs require an education beyond high school.

To tackle this ongoing issue, Dallas County Promise was created with support from JPMorgan Chase’s New Skills for Youth initiative, to help all students complete college with the skills most needed by North Texas employers. To be eligible, students sign the Promise Pledge acknowledging their interest in pursuing postsecondary education, have attended a participating high school for their full senior year, and meet the required deadlines for admissions, course enrollment and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

 The first cohort of participants is already making significant strides as the Dallas County Community College District saw a 35 percent increase in college enrollment and the University of North Texas at Dallas increased their enrollment by 30 percent in the 2017-18 school year.

“We know the surest way to expand access to opportunity is to equip people with the skills needed to compete for well-paying, in-demand jobs that are available today and tomorrow,” said Anne Motsenbocker, Managing Director at JPMorgan Chase and head of the company’s Middle Market Banking division for Texas. “That’s why we are supporting communities around the world to design and implement innovative new approaches to career education that prepare young people to enter the workforce with the skills, experiences, and credentials they need to succeed in good careers in growing industries.”

The program pays for any balance of tuition not covered by federal or state financial aid at participating Promise partner colleges. Ninety-eight percent of eligible students have signed the Promise pledge this year and 60 percent completed the FAFSA. Postsecondary partners include the University of North Texas at Dallas, Southern Methodist University, Texas A&M University—Commerce and Midwestern State University, as well as 11 additional colleges and universities.

The support is not strictly financial; once enrolled in college, participants are supported by a variety of channels, including success coaches to help learners become informed about career opportunities and a 12-month leadership academy that connects Promise students with CEOs to receive mentorship.

 Partners also launched a Parent Promise scholarship to offer parents of 2019 high school seniors tuition toward a certificate or an associate degree. The Parent Promise is limited to parents of students at a subset of high schools that represent areas with low postsecondary degree attainment.

Last year, JPMorgan Chase New Skills for Youth initiative invested $3 million to support the efforts of Dallas County Promise. As the program grows, it will continue to focus on these main goals: to provide technical assistance to schools, to further develop career pathway strategies, and to expand and enhance data capabilities. The program is part of the statewide initiative known as 60x30TX, which has the goal of 60 percent of adults ages 25 to 34 with a degree by 2030 in Texas.

Dallas County Promise is a JPMorgan Chase & Co. New Skills for Youth Innovation Site aiming to improve career pathways for learners. This snapshot is part of a series documenting the progress of the local investments from across the globe that aim to identify and implement the most promising ideas in career education, with a special focus on communities with the greatest needs. Learn more about the innovations sites here.

Nicole Howard, Communications Associate

Welcome Samuel Dunietz to Advance CTE

September 3rd, 2019

My name is Samuel Dunietz and I’m very pleased to join the Advance CTE team as the new Senior Associate for Federal Policy. In my role, I will directly support and advance Advance CTE’s federal policy and implementation strategy, and work to build partnerships with other stakeholders and coalitions. I will represent our members and policies throughout Capitol Hill and other agencies in Washington, D.C. I’m also focused on supporting policies that help states equip learners and instructors with the tools they need for success.

My research and policy interests are especially focused on the role of secondary-postsecondary partnerships, postsecondary CTE programs and best practices for effectively using federal and state data sources for policy implementation.

Prior to joining Advance CTE, I spent my career working in higher education and postsecondary policy and research. Most recently I worked as a consultant focused on postsecondary institutional research issues like enrollment, faculty compensation and federal legislative advocacy consultation. Prior to that, I worked as a researcher at a faculty association, where I directed the government relations program and helped to run the largest survey of faculty compensation in the country. I began my work in higher education and postsecondary policy at MaryPIRG focused on textbook affordability while I studied at the University of Maryland, College Park, where I received my bachelor’s degree.

I’m a native of Maryland and have spent the majority of my adult life in the Washington, D.C. area, although I also lived briefly in New York, Iceland and Sweden. In my personal life, I’m an avid photographer, cook, musician and former Cessna pilot.

This Week in CTE

August 30th, 2019

TWEET OF THE WEEK

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE WEEK

We’re hiring! 

We have an open position for a Senior Associate, Member Engagement & Professional Learning at Advance CTE. Learn more about the position here.

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

In 2015, the U.S. Department of Education began the Second Chance Pell pilot, renewed in 2019, that opened Pell Grants to prisoners in the experimental sites included in this program. Eliminating the ban on Pell in all prisons would give hundreds of thousands access to postsecondary education, and allow these learners to pursue meaningful employment when released from prison. Learn more here.  Listen to the voices of those in the Tulsa Community College – Dick Conner Correctional Facility education program. 

Watch the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGoKuUXGEiA

RESOURCE OF THE WEEK

Characteristics of Public and Private Elementary and Secondary Schools in the United States: Results From the 2017–18 National Teacher and Principal Survey`

This First Look report highlights findings from the 2017–18 National Teacher and Principal Survey (NTPS) a state and a nationally representative sample survey of public and private K–12 schools, principals, and teachers in the 50 states and the

District of Columbia. 

A couple findings to highlight include: 

  • Among public schools with students enrolled in any grades 9 -12, 82 percent offered dual or concurrent enrollment, 37 percent offered a specialized career academy, 74 percent offered career and technical education courses, and 56 percent offered internships outside of school. Among private schools, 23 percent offered CTE.

  • Schools with 0-34 percent of students on free and reduced lunch (FRL) are about 14 percentage points more like to offer dual or concurrent enrollment than schools with 75 percent or more students on FRL; 8 percentage points more likely to offer specialized career academies; 11 percentage points more likely to offer CTE courses; and 17 percentage points more likely to offer internships outside of school.

Read the full report here: https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2019/2019140.pdf

 

Hello from Advance CTE’s Newest Staff Member

August 29th, 2019

My name is Meghan Wills and I joined the Advance CTE team in mid-August 2019. I will be serving as Director of Strategic Initiatives; in this new position, I will oversee and manage major organization-wide initiatives that support, promote and increase learner access to and success in high-quality Career Technical Education (CTE). I will oversee an expansion of state technical assistance to support the implementation of policies, programs and initiatives that increase equitable access to and success in high-quality CTE. In addition, I will lead Advance CTE’s partnership with JPMorgan Chase & Co. on career readiness and student completion of high-quality career pathways.

While I am newer to the CTE policy world, I bring deep knowledge of state policy from the time I spent at the National Governors Association (NGA). I worked at NGA from 2011 to 2019, where I led projects with governors and states on workforce development issues. I oversaw the provision of technical assistance to state workforce system leaders, as well as projects on work-based learning and apprenticeship, the future of work and the on-demand economy, occupational licensing reform and employment of people with disabilities. I look forward to leveraging this experience to strengthen the alignment between state CTE and workforce systems, ensuring that young people across the country are prepared for a lifetime of career success.

I am a passionate advocate for career exploration and providing learners with real-world, hands-on experiences in the classroom, and I strongly believe in the power of CTE in shaping the futures of young people. I look forward to meeting and working with State CTE Directors and other Advance CTE members!

By Meghan Wills, Director of Strategic Initiatives

New Skills for Youth Innovation Site Snapshots Released

August 28th, 2019

Launched in 2016, JPMorgan Chase & Co. New Skills for Youth is a $75 million, five-year global initiative aimed at transforming how cities and states ensure that young people are career ready. In addition to the state-based investments, which Advance CTE – in partnership with the Council of Chief State School Officers and Education Strategy Group – has been helping to lead, JPMorgan Chase has also been investing in local innovation sites across the global.

Earlier this week, Advance CTE released snapshots on five of these innovation sites, which document the progress of the local investments that aim to identify and implement the most promising ideas in career education, with a special focus on communities with the greatest needs. While each site as their unique context, each is working to improve and expand career pathways, hands-on work-based learning experiences, and provide support for learners through sustainable partnerships between the education community and business and industry.

The five snapshots:

Dallas, Texas has launched the Dallas County Promise to remove barriers to college and in-demand careers for Dallas County youth

Denver, Colorado’s CareerConnect is a district-wide initiative to redesign the K-12 experience to provide hands-on learning to all students.

Detroit, Michigan has committed to a district-wide expansion of career pathways across the city’s high schools.

New Orleans, Louisiana’s YouthForce NOLA is coordinating a city-wide effort to build career pathways that result in meaningful credential attainment for all high school students.

South Bronx, New York has four investments in place to expand access to and success through work-based learning in health care, transportation and logistics, and technology, as well as to build a data infrastructure to measure career readiness.

Advance CTE will be releasing another five snapshots on some of JPMorgan Chase’s international investments and a summary report in the coming months.

Kate Kreamer, Deputy Executive Director

 

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