Two Weeks Left to Apply for the 2019 Excellence in Action Award

November 9th, 2018

Think you have one of the most innovative Career Technical Education (CTE) programs of study across the 16 Career Clusters®? Don’t miss your chance to apply for Advance CTE’s annual Excellence in Action award. Applications are open to secondary and postsecondary schools/institutions. Apply by November 21, 2018 here.

Need tips on filling out the application? Watch our recent webinar and hear from a 2018 award winner. If you want to see examples of some stellar programs of study, take a look at all of the 2018 winners here.

Still wondering why your program should apply? Here are four reasons:

  1. Showcase your program on the national stage! The success of your learners, partners, faculty and instructors will be highlighted in articles and blogs throughout the year.

  2. Recognition at the Advance CTE Spring Meeting in Washington, D.C. Representatives from winning programs will receive travel and lodging to honor your program at an awards ceremony in front of State CTE Directors, state leaders, national partners and the media.

  3. Celebrate your program in your own community with a physical and digital banner.

  4. Demonstrate what high-quality CTE programs of study look like at the national, state and local levels.

Nicole Howard, Communications Associate

Excellence in Action Spotlighting: William J. Pete Knight High School, Digital Design and Engineering Academy

November 8th, 2018

Today is National Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Day or STEM. Day, recognized annually on November 8th.

According to the PEW Research Center, employment in STEM occupations have grown 79 percent since 1990, from 9.7 million to 17.3 million, many of which are high-wage careers. PEW reports that those with some college education, working full-time earn $54,745 while a similarly educated non-STEM employee earns 26 percent less. Watch videos of employees in STEM Careers speak about their experience in the industry here.

STEM is also one of the 16 Career Clusters® in the National Career Clusters® Framework. Learners can begin cultivating a path towards a STEM career in Career Technical Education (CTE) programs of study. This year, the Digital Design and Engineering Academy at William J. Pete Knight High School in Lancaster, California received the National Excellence in Action award in the STEM Career Cluster.

This high-quality program of study launched in 2010 to provide learners with rigorous and integrated academic and technical coursework, in addition to the full continuum of work-based learning experiences.  Learners can earn college credit for both engineering and general education/core academic courses through articulation agreements and Advanced Placement. The engineering program of study benefits from partnerships with industry leaders such as Northrop Grumman, Edwards Air Force Base, the Air Force Research Laboratory, Lockheed Martin and even NASA. Internships offered by these leading employers often lead to employment opportunities upon graduation.

In addition to internships, learners gain valuable experiences by using real-world skills to help communities. Learners took the lead in developing a partnership with Grid Alternatives, a non-profit organization that brings reliable energy to communities that are not on the electrical grid through solar power technology. The Academy students assisted a school in Nicaragua with no access to power.

In a recent report, Understanding the Equity Challenge in Career Technical Education, Advance CTE shared the historical gender inequities in CTE. To ensure all learners have access to STEM education and careers, the engineering academy has hired female instructors and created events focused on young women in STEM. As a result, the 2016-17 class had a 16-percentage point increase in female enrollment.

Learners recently traveled to Australia and competed in the 2018 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) challenge. This competition highlights how drones can be used to help people in health related situations. The teams from Knight High School won first and second place in the Airborne Delivery Challenge, which tests learner’s application of drone technology to drop an EpiPen to a simulated “lost hiker.” They also won the Best Rookie Team award.

To learn more about this program of study read their profile here.

 

 

2018 Election Update

November 7th, 2018

Americans went to the polls on Tuesday, November 6 to cast ballots for Members of Congress, Governors and State Superintendents. Read below to learn more about the results thus far.

U.S. House of Representatives Flips to Democratic Majority 

Current projections indicate that Democrats will pick up at least 30 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives (results are not yet final), gaining control of the chamber for the 116th Congress. As of this writing, 414 of 435 races have been called, with Democrats holding 220 seats and Republicans holding 194. Given this, current Minority Leader Rep. Pelosi (D-CA) is expected to become the Speaker of the House and the leadership for House committees will shift. The leadership for the House Committee on Education and the Workforce will likely change from current Chairwoman Rep. Foxx (R-NC) to current Ranking Member Rep. Scott (D-VA). The leadership for the House Appropriations Committee will also likely shift from current Chairman Rep. Frelinghuysen (R-NJ) to current Ranking Member Rep. Lowey (D-NY). The Co-Chairs of the Congressional CTE Caucus, Rep. Thompson (R-PA) and Rep. Langevin (D-RI) were re-elected, as was Rep. Krishnamoorthi (D-IL) (who co-sponsored the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V)).

Republicans Retain Senate Majority

Current projections indicate that Republicans will pick up at least two seats in the U.S. Senate (results are not yet final) and maintain their majority heading into the 116th Congress. Given this, current Majority Leader Sen. McConnell (R-KY) is expected to retain his leadership role. As of this writing, 96 of 100 races have been called, with Republicans holding 51 seats, Democrats holding 43 seats and Independents holding two seats (Senators Sanders (I-VT) and King (I-ME) caucus with Democrats). The races in Montana, Florida and Arizona are too close to call and the special election for one of the Mississippi Senate seats is headed to a runoff election in December. Two of the four Senate CTE Caucus Co-Chairs, Sen. Kaine (D-VA) and Sen. Baldwin (D-WI), were up for reelection and both won their races.

Transitions in the States: Governors and State Superintendents

The dust is still settling in a few key gubernatorial races, but many competitive races have already closed. Of the 36 states that held races for governor this year, 16 are projected to be won by Democrats, 20 are projected to be won by Republicans and six flipped from Republican to Democratic control. Education was a top issue in several of these contests. In Wisconsin, State Superintendent Tony Evers defeated incumbent Governor Scott Walker.

Voters in seven states also selected new state superintendents: California, Arizona, Oklahoma, Georgia, Idaho, South Carolina and Wyoming. Notably, a ballot initiative was defeated in South Carolina that would have given the governor the power to appoint the state superintendent of education.

What do these results mean for CTE? It may be too early to tell, but career readiness was a pillar for many candidates’ education platforms in the 2018 midterm election. In February, the American Enterprise Institute reported that CTE was the education issue that garnered the most support from candidates. Either way, states should start preparing for new leadership from the governor’s mansion down to local school boards. Advance CTE has developed a suite of resources and tools to educate new policymakers on the value and promise of CTE, including a PowerPoint template, tips for engaging policymakers and communications materials from states.

Kathryn Zekus, Senior Associate for Federal Policy and Austin Estes, Senior Policy Associate

This Week in CTE

November 2nd, 2018

TWEET OF THE WEEK

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE WEEK

U.S. Departments of Education and Labor Award STEM, Apprenticeship Grants

The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Innovation and Improvement awarded over $100 million in grants in the last month through the Education Innovation and Research grant program. Eleven of the 18 awards focused on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) in some way. Read our blog to learn more http://blog.careertech.org/?p=14802.

To make sure you get the latest news and resources about federal policy that affects Career Technical Education (CTE), sign up for our Legislative Updates!

VIDEO OF THE WEEK

CTE: Pathways to College and Careers

Employers, learners, and teachers share how CTE helps students apply what they learn in the classroom to solve real-world problems through project-based learning. Learners and instructors explain how CTE increases engagement and gives them a leg up on finding their career interests. In the Advance CTE Value and Promise of Career Technical Education national survey, 91 percent of parents and learners in CTE believe their child is getting a leg up on their career compared to only 44 percent of prospective parents. Max Pence, Accountant at PricewaterhouseCoopers, talks about how the introductions to business and industry in high school helped him visualize his future college major and create a plan for a career in accounting.

Watch the video to learn more.

RESOURCE OF THE WEEK

New Skills for Youth Phase Two Evaluation

New Skills for Youth (NSFY) is supporting career pathways development in 10 states to prepare young people for high-skill, high-demand careers. With funding from JPMorgan Chase, the states’ NSFY work builds on a prior six-month planning and initial implementation phase and pathways and career readiness initiatives and activities predating NSFY. This report documents state activities and progress within the first 18 months of implementation of Phase Two, during which states refined plans, solidified the engagement and responsibilities of participating agencies and stakeholders, and initiated pathways development in accordance with the initiative’s objectives. Although it is premature to assess the long-term impact of this work, this report highlights key achievements to date and notes emerging cross-state themes. Read the full report here

Staff Reflections Part 2: Honoring State CTE Leadership Award Winners

October 31st, 2018

At the Advance CTE Fall Meeting, we were thrilled to honor three Career Technical Education (CTE) leaders through our new State CTE Leadership awards. Wendi Morton, CTE Coordinator of Federal and State Programs at the Utah State Board of Education, received the Rising Star award. Richard Katt, the former State CTE Director at the Nebraska Department of Education, and John T. Pulver, Associate Director of the Pennsylvania Association of Career & Technical Administrators (PACTA), each received the Distinguished Leadership award.

Thalea Longhurst, State CTE Director, Utah State Board of Education, was moved in the moment as she reflected on Wendi’s accomplishments and dedication to CTE. One of those many accomplishments was overhauling the state’s program approval process to guarantee that every learner is participating in a high-quality program of study. She has also worked across departments to ensure that both full- and part-time instructors can be licensed seamlessly, enabling all learners to be taught by knowledgeable experts.

Lee Burket, Director of the Bureau of Career Technical Education in Pennsylvania introduced Pulver. She described Pulver as instrumental to federal policy work by meeting with multiple Congressional staff during the reauthorization of the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V) to ensure that the new law met the needs of today’s and future learners.

Katt wasn’t able to attend but Katie Graham, State CTE Director of Nebraska gave remarks on his behalf that had the whole audience laughing and clapping. He is well known in the Advance CTE community and served as a Board of Directors member for over 15 years. He has dedicated 17 years of his life working in the role of the State CTE Director in Nebraska, influencing the lives of over 91,000 learners each year. He was the driving force behind the development of the reVISION strategic planning process. He also developed the Nebraska Career Education Model, which has been replicated across the country. While Katt wasn’t physically there, his inspiration to ‘be bold’ was a theme throughout the entire Fall Meeting.

Advance CTE thanks all of those who dedicate their work and passions to elevate CTE in their state.

Nicole Howard, Communications Associate

New Advance CTE Report Examines Expanding Middle School CTE

October 30th, 2018

Middle school Career Technical Education (CTE) has the power to expose students to college and career options and equip them with the transferable skills they need to plan for and succeed in high school and beyond. In recent years, a number of states have invested resources and supports to expand CTE and career exploration opportunities in middle schools, a trend that is likely to continue with the recent passage of the Strengthening Career Technical Education for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V), which now allows states to use Perkins funding to support CTE as early as the fifth grade.

To help states unpack the potential approaches to expanding and ensuring high-quality middle school CTE options, Advance CTE – in partnership with the Council of Chief State School Officers and Education Strategy Group, through the New Skills for Youth Initiative, funded by JPMorgan Chase & Co. – examine leading states’ approaches to middle school CTE in Expanding Middle School CTE to Promote Lifelong Learner Success. Some of the state approaches highlighted in the report include:

  • Nebraska’s use of in-and-out of school experiences to expand access to middle school CTE, particularly to rural communities;
  • Ohio’s use of standards and course options to ensure vertical alignment of middle school and high school CTE;
  • Utah’s competency-based approach to middle school CTE; and
  • North Carolina’s Career and Technical Education Grade Expansion Program.

The report concludes with major considerations for states when implementing or expanding middle school CTE, such as removing any restrictions that prevent states from accessing Perkins V funding and deciding whether middle school CTE is about career exploration, career preparation or both.

Brianna McCain, Policy Associate

Advance CTE Joins the Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeship Initiative

October 29th, 2018

High schools are struggling to prepare young people for today’s economy. Too many students are disengaged and have difficulty navigating their options after graduation. And, many students lack affordable postsecondary opportunities, while a postsecondary education is more important than ever. These challenges make the path to economic security difficult, especially for those facing the persistent racial, gender, and other inequities present in the country today.

At the same time, to compete and grow, employers need to build a sustainable pipeline of workers with adaptable skills. Career Technical Education (CTE) is central to ensuring we align students’ talents and interests with the needs of our economy and employers, and, in recent years, a number of states and communities have developed new youth apprenticeship programs to further expand access to high-quality, career-focused pathways for more learners.

Youth apprenticeship – when designed with quality and equity in mind – allow students to complete high school, start their postsecondary education at no cost, get paid work experience alongside a mentor, and start on a path that broadens their options for the future. However, the policy and practice of youth apprenticeship is still relatively nascent in the United States, necessitating supports and resources for the field.  This is why New America launched the Partnership to Advance Youth Apprenticeships – or PAYA – a national effort, of which Advance CTE is thrilled to be a part.

The partners of PAYA – Advance CTE, CareerWise Colorado, Charleston Regional Youth Apprenticeships, Education Strategy Group, JFF, the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity, the National Fund for Workforce Solutions, the National Governors Association and New America – will be working together over the next two years to explore the ways youth apprenticeship can be reinvented to better meet the needs of learners and employers.

“We are excited to work on an initiative that will help ensure that each learner has access to a high-quality education and meaningful work-based experiences that provides the skills he or she needs to be successful in a high-wage, in-demand career,” said Kimberly Green, Executive Director of Advance CTE. “PAYA represents a unique blend of policy, practice and research cutting across the national, state and local levels and has the potential for an incredible impact across our country.”

Over the next four years, PAYA will support efforts in states and cities to expand access to high-quality apprenticeship opportunities for high school age youth. PAYA will convene experts and partners, support a community of practitioners, publish research, and provide grants and direct assistance to promising youth apprenticeship programs in cities and states across the U.S.

Advance CTE joins our partners in thanking the funders of this initiative – Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Ballmer Group, Bloomberg Philanthropies, the Joyce Foundation, JP Morgan Chase & Co., and the Siemens Foundation.

To learn more about PAYA and how youth apprenticeship can unlock opportunity for both young people and employers, visit newamerica.org/paya and stay connected to the initiative’s progress following the #PAYA hashtag.

Kate Kreamer, Deputy Executive Director
Katie Fitzgerald, Communications Manager 

New Advance CTE and College Board Guide Examines How AP Courses can be Integrated into CTE Programs of Study

October 29th, 2018

Advanced Placement® (AP) and Career Technical Education (CTE) courses can and should work in tandem to support career readiness by encouraging the development of the academic knowledge and technical skills that are, together, increasingly important to students’ overall employability. For too long, “college-ready” and “career-ready” coursework and experiences have been viewed as separate in schools. With an estimated 65 percent of jobs in the economy requiring postsecondary education and training beyond high school by 2020, schools should promote college and career readiness.

To help state, district and school leaders think through how to place students on pathways that prepare them for college and career, Advance CTE and the College Board partnered to examine how AP® courses can be integrated into CTE programs of study in Advanced Placement® and Career and Technical Education: Working Together. This guide examines how specific AP courses can be embedded into or used to augment programs of study by Career Cluster®. To help leaders with this work, this resource provides guiding questions for leaders to consider and examines how Maryland and Tennessee integrate AP courses into CTE programs of study.

Brianna McCain, Policy Associate

U.S. Departments of Education Awards STEM Grants, Will Form Negotiated Rulemaking Committee

October 26th, 2018

With both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate on recess until after the elections, the news from the Capitol in October is focused on the Administration’s activities related to Career Technical Education (CTE). Read below to learn more about updates from the U.S. Departments of Education and Labor and new Perkins V resources.

U.S. Department of Education Forms Higher Education Negotiated Rulemaking Committee

The Office of Postsecondary Education within the U.S. Department of Education established a negotiated rulemaking committee to create and propose higher education regulations related to Federal Student Aid programs within Title IV of the Higher Education Act. The committee will be named the “Accreditation and Innovation Committee,” and will have three subcommittees including the “Distance Learning and Educational Innovation Subcommittee.” Nominations for negotiators to be part of the committee must be submitted by November 15, 2018.

U.S. Departments of Education and Labor Award STEM, Apprenticeship Grants

The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Innovation and Improvement awarded over $100 million in grants in the last month through the Education Innovation and Research grant program. Eleven of the 18 awards focused on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) in some way.

In addition, over $1.5 million in grants were awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor to apprenticeship programs for women. The Women in Apprenticeship and Nontraditional Occupations grants are intended to help “recruit, train, and retain more American women in quality pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship programs, and pursue careers in manufacturing, infrastructure, and cybersecurity, among other industries.”

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos Visits Apprenticeship Program, Speaks at National FFA Convention and Exposition 

On October 18, Secretary DeVos visited Harper College in Palatine, Illinois. During her visit, she saw the school’s apprenticeship program and had the opportunity to hear about how the school partners with local employers. On October 26, Secretary DeVos provided remarks at the National FFA Convention and Exposition in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Advance CTE and National Skills Coalition Release New Brief

This week, Advance CTE and National Skills Coalition released a new resource, Coordinating Across Perkins V and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. This guide looks at six opportunities to promote coordination across Perkins V and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) as states develop and implement plans under Perkins V. Looking for additional resources on Perkins V? Check out Advance CTE’s Perkins V webpage.

Kathryn Zekus, Senior Associate, Federal Policy 

Siemens USA CEO Keynotes Advance CTE Fall Meeting

October 26th, 2018

On Tuesday, October 23, Barbara Humpton, CEO of Siemens Foundation gave the keynote address at the Advance CTE 2018 Fall Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland. Humpton’s many responsibilities include managing the company’s strategy and engagement and leading more than 50,000 employees. Humpton began her remarks by emphasizing the importance Siemens places on investing in their employees. The Siemens Foundation has invested more than $100 million in the United States to advance workforce development and education initiatives in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).

Humpton also shared her personal connection to Career Technical Education (CTE). She developed her passion for STEM early in her education and the opportunity to gain experience working directly with IBM inspired her to continue in this area. Humpton’s passion grew as she saw the impact of her work. “What matters to me is the mission, what matters to me is purpose, doing things because they are making a big change in the world,”  she said.

Her search for meaning in her career mirrors the aspiration of learners and their parent’s across the country. She cited The Value and Promise of Career Technical Education: Results from a National Survey of Parents and Students to emphasize this key finding – discovering a career passion is the most important critical goal for both learners and parents– even surpassing having a career that pays well.

Humpton challenged the attendees to work to reach more people and help them see CTE’s true potential. How we talk about CTE is important and continuing to create platforms that share learner success stories and high-quality programs can contribute to changing outdated perceptions.

She closed by stating that this is an important moment for CTE. She encouraged all of us to be bold, to reach out to employers, to discover and utilize the talent in each community and thanked the CTE leaders for their commitment to students and public service.

Nicole Howard, Communications Associate 

 

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