Posts Tagged ‘CTE Fall Meeting’

Making the Case for a Cross-Disciplinary STEM Core

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

Submitted by CORD, 2021 Fall Meeting Sponsor

The nature of work is evolving right before our eyes. Technological advancements are transforming existing industries and creating new ones at an unprecedented pace. The World Economic Forum predicts significant disruption in the jobs landscape over the next four years. As many as 85 million current job roles may be displaced while more than 97 million new roles could emerge. Many of those roles will be enhanced by technologies that can collaborate with humans to enrich lives and workplaces in what the National Science Foundation (NSF) describes as the “future of work at the human-technology frontier.” Our challenge as state Career Technical Education (CTE) leaders is ensuring future technicians acquire the expanding skill sets necessary for success in a rapidly changing environment. 

Through the NSF-Advanced Technological Education (ATE) supported initiative, Preparing Technicians for the Future of Work, staff at the Center for Occupational Research and Development (CORD) led a series of research activities designed to identify the knowledge and skills that will be essential for future STEM techniciansThis work has resulted in the Framework for a Cross-Disciplinary STEM Core (The Framework), a set of recommendations for technician education that incorporate knowledge and skills such as Advanced Digital Literacy, Data Knowledge and Analysis, and Business Knowledge and Processes into technician preparation programs. These core content areas are essential to future success in STEM fields because they transcend narrow job specialization and enable technicians to adapt to a complex employment environment. Topics within these areas have been prioritized by educators and industry leaders.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Framework offers practical recommendations for implementation, with regional customization, by any community college technical program. Steps toward adoption of the Framework include:

Download the Framework today and discover ways you can advocate for adoption of the Cross-Disciplinary STEM Core in your state.

By Brittany Cannady in Advance CTE Fall Meeting, Resources
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Digital Badges: Professional Recognition for the Modern Workforce

Monday, October 25th, 2021

Submitted by iCEV, 2021 Fall Meeting Sponsor

Skills Verification in the Digital Age

Digital badges are a powerful way to take charge of professional growth and development, and they have become a popular way for individuals to upskill and advance their careers. Businesses, schools and organizations use digital badges to provide skills verification and offer opportunities for career advancement.

Digital badges signify the learner has completed a formally approved set of standards or competencies. Learners earn badges when they complete specific tasks to prove their knowledge and skills. Earning badges is a professional way for learners to share career development experiences with others and highlight their commitment to knowledge expansion in a particular area. 

Because they are an online representation of knowledge, skills and accomplishments, digital badges provide an opportunity to promote those attributes through various channels. Digital badges can be added to email signatures and digital resumes or shared on social media platforms. A digital badge provides verifiable metadata that describes the qualifications and process required to earn the digital badge, making it easier for others to recognize the learner’s expertise and achievements.

Introducing iCEV Digital Badges

iCEV is committed to providing lifelong learners the tools necessary to achieve academic and professional goals. In an ever-changing marketplace, it is essential to communicate skills and credentials effectively. iCEV has partnered with Credly to offer a modernized version of credentials through digital badging. This fall, iCEV will begin offering digital badges to anyone who earns an industry certification hosted on the iCEV Certification Testing Platform; iCEV has already started awarding badges to educators who attend an iCEV professional development event.

iCEV first began awarding digital badges at CTE Inspired, a virtual conference hosted by iCEV. Badges were awarded to presenters, as well as attendees, based on the number of sessions attended. Nearly 2,000 presenters and recipients received an iCEV digital badge by participating in CTE Inspired. 

Whether an individual earns an industry certification or an educator receives professional development credit, the digital badges awarded by iCEV offer a portable, verifiable method for professional accomplishment. Visit our website to learn more about iCEV’s new digital badging initiatives. 

By Brittany Cannady in Advance CTE Fall Meeting
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What Happened to the Men?

Friday, October 22nd, 2021

Submitted by Brett Pawlowski, NC3T, 2021 Fall Meeting Sponsor

I read an article in the Wall Street Journal that floored me – so much that I had to read it a second time. And, I still haven’t figured out how to react, or how big the impact on our society is going to be.

The article, published September 6, is titled “A Generation of American Men Give Up on College: ‘I Just Feel Lost’.” From the article: 

Men are abandoning higher education in such numbers that they
now trail female college students by record levels.

At the close of the 2020-21 academic year, women made up 59.5% of college students,
an all-time high, and men 40.5%, according to enrollment data
from the National Student Clearinghouse, a nonprofit research group.
U.S. colleges and universities had 1.5 million fewer students compared with five years ago,
and men accounted for 71% of the decline.

The percentage of women undergrads is at an all-time high – not because more women are going to a two-or four-year college – but because the number of men doing so has fallen off a cliff.

Why would that be?

Men in interviews around the U.S. said they quit school or didn’t enroll because they didn’t see enough value in a college degree for all the effort and expense required to earn one. Many said they wanted to make money after high school.

Another explanation:

“Many young men are hobbled by a lack of guidance, a strain of anti-intellectualism, and a growing belief that college degrees don’t pay off,” said Ed Grocholski, a Senior Vice President at Junior Achievement USA, which works with about five million learners every year to teach about career paths, financial literacy and entrepreneurship.

I don’t know the real reasons, and I certainly don’t know the solutions. But what I do know is that historically, those with higher levels of education have had significantly better financial and life outcomes. There’s every reason to believe that’s still the case going forward. And, the fact that this topic sees so little conversation is alarming. If we don’t address these issues, and we allow so many young men to fall through the cracks, we’re in for a very tough time as a nation.

We join with Advance CTE members in promoting the value of career-connected learning as an essential strategy for engaging and preparing young men and women for their futures. NC3T stands ready to help state Career Technical Education (CTE) leaders with coaching, professional development and technical assistance around pathways development and the creation of a profile of a graduate. NC3T also helps to manage work-based learning with its Seamless WBL platform, and it supports career exploration across schools with the new CareerSmart Schools tool. Visit us at NC3T.com for more.

By Brittany Cannady in Advance CTE Fall Meeting, Resources
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Industry Certifications: Joining Industry and Education Together

Wednesday, October 20th, 2021

Submitted by Lincoln Electric, 2021 Fall Meeting Sponsor 

Even before the current pandemic, there was a welding skills gap. That could actually mean a couple of different things: It could mean there simply are not enough skilled welders to fill the welding careers available, or it could mean there is a disconnect between the skills employers are looking for and the skills applicants actually have. Either way, this gap’s existence is a real problem in the welding industry today—for both employers and job-seeking welders. 

If the problem is that trained welders do not have the specific skills employers are looking for, then the solution is to examine welding education and find a way to bridge the gap. Educational institutions communicate with the welding industry to understand which skills their students actually need for today’s jobs. Because the industry is constantly changing, the needed skills are constantly changing—which means that this communication between education and industry must be ongoing.

Lincoln Electric is heavily involved in both the industry and welding education, making sure communication is constantly maintained between the two to improve curriculum and training as the industry evolves. From this, the Lincoln Electric Education Partner Schools (LEEPS) welding program was created.

The LEEPS welding certification program is a partnership with the National Coalition of Certification Centers (NC3), which provides curriculum and learning management resources for students and welders to earn standards-based certifications. These certifications are portable and stackable, which means welders can build their own skill base for specific job requirements by combining the skills and certifications they need for immediate employability.

The LEEPS program creates standardization with the train-the-trainer program. All instructors who teach and certify welding students through a partner school have been through the same training, taken the same tests, and used the same curriculum materials. That means employers can feel confident that anyone who earns a LEEPS certification was taught the same content in the same way and has passed the same weld tests with the same grading rubric. This kind of consistency helps welders to have documented, proven competencies to show employers; employers know they can expect this consistency from an institution with a standardized process.

Because this program offers a way to integrate certifications into an existing educational institution, it doesn’t limit students or employers to one geographic area. With a traditional welding school, students all train at a single location and are likely to seek jobs in the same general area. With a program like LEEPS, the same quality welding education is available all over the country, so it’s more accessible to students and employers alike. This means employers can find job applicants in their area with the same qualifications as the job seekers in many states across the U.S. Employers can even set up their own internal training with LEEPS to put their welders on the fast track to certification in the specific areas that are needed in their workplace.

There is a skills gap in the welding industry, but our welding education programs can help fix it. With standardized, configurable training, today’s welders can complete valuable certifications in a way that’s both convenient and relevant to the available jobs. By bringing industry and education together collaboratively, curriculum can be tailored to meet the needs of both welders and employers in today’s job market.

By Brittany Cannady in Advance CTE Fall Meeting
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CTE: Learning that Works

Monday, October 18th, 2021

Submitted by Denise Hobbs, Oracle Academy, 2021 Fall Meeting Sponsor

In my role, I have the opportunity to speak with education leaders at all levels―learning, sharing ideas, celebrating successes and understanding their challenges. I never miss the chance to highlight why I believe that Career Technical Education (CTE) is so important.

CTE ignites imagination through clear learning pathways. CTE learning pathways lead learners to college and career success. Many of these pathways include industry certifications and apprenticeship/internships, and all start with career exploration within that pathway and igniting learners’ imaginations. Oracle Academy is Oracle’s global, philanthropic, award-winning educational program, which operates with the goal of advancing computing education to increase knowledge, innovation, skills development, and diversity in technology fields. Oracle Academy partners with institutions to create computing education pathways, train teachers, cultivate critical thinking, and bring creative, academic computing technology curriculum into classrooms. Oracle’s leadership in emerging technologies and cloud technologies spurs Oracle Academy’s innovation-focused curriculum, resources and events so that each learner has a holistic view of careers in technology.   

CTE is for ALL learners. As we know, the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act is critical to ensuring that quality and sustainable CTE programs meet the changing needs of learners and employers. CTE offers unique opportunities for career discovery and skills development aligned to learning pathways. Oracle Academy supports diversity in technology and actively works to increase the participation of all students in computing, including women and other under-represented groups. With Oracle Academy, all learners have equal opportunity to attain hands-on experience with the latest technologies, helping them gain industry-relevant knowledge and skills in topics including cloud technology, artificial intelligence, machine learning, data science and more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Free resources help educators and their students teach and learn computing. Oracle Academy understands and values educators as partners who are empowered to facilitate innovative student learning in and outside the classroom. We offer educators and their students FREE resources to teach and learn computing, including curriculum, software, and certifications.

Learn more at academy.oracle.com.

Denise Hobbs
Senior Director, Oracle Academy North America
dhobbs@oracle.com

By Brittany Cannady in Advance CTE Fall Meeting, Resources
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Meeting CTE’s Moment with Systemic Quality

Tuesday, October 5th, 2021

Submitted by NOCTI, 2021 Fall Meeting Sponsor 

It has been said that: 1) innovation survives when people believe in ideas; 2) an idea that survives is one that creatively solves a problem; and 3) a great idea is one that survives over time. By these metrics Career Technical Education (CTE) is clearly a great idea, evidenced by the federal funding that supports it, allowing states to establish their own CTE delivery system that leads to learner success in a career of their choice. This has resulted in 50+ versions of what a high-quality CTE program looks like. 

The real strength of any CTE program is based on a curriculum developed with quality in mind, advised by industry expertise, and delivered in a real-world environment by a teacher with an occupational skill set and significant work experience. Innovative states maintain programs to assist in the consistent challenge CTE educators face of transitioning from the workplace to the classroom. In some states, individuals are given a certification or a license to teach in public schools. However, high-quality programs aren’t just about certifications; they must also establish a pathway to continued instructional improvement and support career growth and success.

NOCTI has been involved in helping to establish a systematized approach to quality CTE teacher preparation since the 1960s, and decisions in the instructional improvement process rely on objective data. However, only recently has NOCTI focused on the quality of the major components of a CTE system.

Through a collaboration of numerous organizations and states, NOCTI is excited to announce its upcoming launch of two levels of national certification for CTE teachers, CTE administrators and professionals managing CTE data. Each of these certifications focus on assuring a uniform, high-quality CTE system. 

NOCTI’s education professional credentials can be used as part of the hiring process, a component of a state licensing system or as a guide for individualized or group professional development. For more information visit www.nocti.org.

By Brittany Cannady in Advance CTE Fall Meeting
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